US

Honoring fallen men and women in blue not always black and white for memorial wall officials

  • FILE- In an Aug. 18, 2009 file photo, Isaiah Sabounjian, 5, left, and his brother Tyler Sabounjian, 5, of Silver Spring, Md., make rubbings of their grandfather's name, Capitol Police Sgt. Christopher Eney, who was accidentally killed during a SWAT training exercise in Washington in 1984, after a ceremony honoring Eney on the 25th anniversary of his death at the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Washington. Tough calls don’t often confront the people responsible for deciding who belongs on a national memorial for officers killed in the line of duty. But recognizing fallen men and women in blue isn’t always a black-and-white decision. The cases of two inductees this year highlight challenges for the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund. It holds a vigil Monday, May 13, 2013, for 321 officers added to the wall. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)

    FILE- In an Aug. 18, 2009 file photo, Isaiah Sabounjian, 5, left, and his brother Tyler Sabounjian, 5, of Silver Spring, Md., make rubbings of their grandfather's name, Capitol Police Sgt. Christopher Eney, who was accidentally killed during a SWAT training exercise in Washington in 1984, after a ceremony honoring Eney on the 25th anniversary of his death at the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Washington. Tough calls don’t often confront the people responsible for deciding who belongs on a national memorial for officers killed in the line of duty. But recognizing fallen men and women in blue isn’t always a black-and-white decision. The cases of two inductees this year highlight challenges for the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund. It holds a vigil Monday, May 13, 2013, for 321 officers added to the wall. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • This undated photo provided by Kathleen Smith shows her grandfather Sgt. Caleb Embree Smith of the Flint, Mich., Police Department, who died by poisoning in 1921. Smith is one of 321 officers whose name will be added to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Washington, on Monday, May 13, 2013. (AP Photo/Courtesy of Kathleen Smith)

    This undated photo provided by Kathleen Smith shows her grandfather Sgt. Caleb Embree Smith of the Flint, Mich., Police Department, who died by poisoning in 1921. Smith is one of 321 officers whose name will be added to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Washington, on Monday, May 13, 2013. (AP Photo/Courtesy of Kathleen Smith)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - This undated photo provided by the Wauwatosa Police Department shows officer Jennifer L. Sebena, who was shot multiple times while working Christmas Eve 2012. Sebena, whose husband has been charged in her death, is one of 321 officers whose name will be added to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Washington, on Monday, May 13, 2013. (AP Photo/Wauwatosa Police Department, File)

    FILE - This undated photo provided by the Wauwatosa Police Department shows officer Jennifer L. Sebena, who was shot multiple times while working Christmas Eve 2012. Sebena, whose husband has been charged in her death, is one of 321 officers whose name will be added to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Washington, on Monday, May 13, 2013. (AP Photo/Wauwatosa Police Department, File)  (The Associated Press)

Tough calls don't often confront the people responsible for deciding who belongs on a national memorial for officers killed in the line of duty.

But recognizing fallen men and women in blue isn't always a black-and-white decision.

The cases of two inductees this year highlight challenges for the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund. It holds a vigil Monday for 321 officers added to the wall in Washington, D.C.

Detective Sgt. Caleb Embree Smith of Flint died by poisoning in 1921. Wauwatosa, Wis., Officer Jennifer Sebena was shot multiple times while working last Christmas Eve, and her husband is a suspect.

Smith's case remains unsolved. Sebena's was originally viewed as domestic violence. Both have been memorialized.

Officials say most applications have been approved during more than two decades.