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Cleveland suspect was a 'monster' toward his wife, relatives say; 'really controlling'

  • Elida Caraballo talks about the abuse her late sister, Grimilda Figueroa, suffered at the hands of her common law husband, Ariel Castro, during an interview at her home in Cleveland Thursday, May 9, 2013. Castro has been charged with kidnapping and rape for holding three women captive for a decade in his Cleveland home. (AP Photo/Mark Duncan)The Associated Press

  • Law enforcement officials gather evidence at the crime scene where three women were hjeld captive in Cleveland, Ohio, Thursday, May 9, 2013. Ariel Castro, a 52-year-old former school bus driver, is being held on $8 million bail under a suicide watch in jail, where he is charged with rape and kidnapping for allegedly abducting three women and holding them captive in his home for a decade. (AP Photo/David Duprey)The Associated Press

  • In this undated photo provided by Elida Caraballo, her sister, Grimilda Figueroa, is shown with two of her children, Ryan, left, and Rosie. Figueroa, who died last year, was the common law wife of Ariel Castro, accused of kidnapping and holding three women captive for a decade in his Cleveland home. (AP Photo/Elida Caraballo)The Associated Press

  • This image provided by the Cuyahoga County Sheriff's office shows the Cuyahoga County Corrections Center booking photo of Ariel Castro, 52, after he was ordered to be held on $8 million bail Thursday, May 9, 2013, in Cleveland. Castro, a former school bus driver, is accused of imprisoning three young women and beating them repeatedly over a decade in Cleveland. (AP Photo/Cuyahoga County)The Associated Press

  • Elida Caraballo, right, talks about the abuse her late sister, Grimilda Figueroa, suffered at the hands of her common law husband, Ariel Castro, during an interview with her husband, Frank, at their home in Cleveland Thursday, May 9, 2013. Castro has been charged with kidnapping and rape for holding three women captive for a decade in his Cleveland home. (AP Photo/Mark Duncan)The Associated Press

Ariel Castro, the man accused of imprisoning three women at his home in Cleveland, kept a life-size mannequin in the house and liked to use it to scare people.

He installed padlocks on every door leading into the house. When relatives came to visit, he made them wait for half an hour before emerging, and nobody was allowed past the living room.

In the days since Castro's arrest, relatives and acquaintances have sketched a portrait of him as a man with a twisted sense of humor, a compulsion for secrecy and a powerful violent streak.

Others around the neighborhood remember him a good guy who liked music and motorcycles.