US

FBI agent testifies about evidence against suspect in ricin-mailing case

  • A Prince George's County, Md. firefighter, left, gets dressed in a protective suit before going into a government mail screening facility in Hyattsville, Md., Wednesday, April 17, 2013. Police swept across the U.S. Capitol complex to chase a flurry of reports of suspicious packages and envelopes Wednesday after preliminary tests indicated poisonous ricin in two letters sent to President Barack Obama and a Mississippi senator.  (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

    A Prince George's County, Md. firefighter, left, gets dressed in a protective suit before going into a government mail screening facility in Hyattsville, Md., Wednesday, April 17, 2013. Police swept across the U.S. Capitol complex to chase a flurry of reports of suspicious packages and envelopes Wednesday after preliminary tests indicated poisonous ricin in two letters sent to President Barack Obama and a Mississippi senator. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)  (The Associated Press)

  • A Prince George's County, Md. firefighter dressed in a protective suit walks into a government mail screening facility in Hyattsville, Md., Wednesday, April 17, 2013. Police swept across the U.S. Capitol complex to chase a flurry of reports of suspicious packages and envelopes Wednesday after preliminary tests indicated poisonous ricin in two letters sent to President Barack Obama and a Mississippi senator.  (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

    A Prince George's County, Md. firefighter dressed in a protective suit walks into a government mail screening facility in Hyattsville, Md., Wednesday, April 17, 2013. Police swept across the U.S. Capitol complex to chase a flurry of reports of suspicious packages and envelopes Wednesday after preliminary tests indicated poisonous ricin in two letters sent to President Barack Obama and a Mississippi senator. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)  (The Associated Press)

  • A Capitol Police Hazardous Materials Response Team truck is parked at the Russell Senate Office building on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, April 17, 2013, after reports of suspicious packages discovered on Capitol Hill. U.S. Capitol police are investigating the discovery of at least two suspicious envelopes in Senate office buildings across the street from the Capitol.  (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

    A Capitol Police Hazardous Materials Response Team truck is parked at the Russell Senate Office building on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, April 17, 2013, after reports of suspicious packages discovered on Capitol Hill. U.S. Capitol police are investigating the discovery of at least two suspicious envelopes in Senate office buildings across the street from the Capitol. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)  (The Associated Press)

An FBI agent has testified that he could not say whether agents have found ricin in the home of a Mississippi man accused of mailing the toxin to the president and a senator.

Agent Brandon M. Grant testified at a hearing Friday in Oxford, Miss., for Paul Kevin Curtis Prosecutors had asked to delay the hearing because the investigation was still ongoing. But a judge refused that request.

Grant stressed that the investigation is ongoing and that he does not know what may have been found with the hearing approaching two hours long. He says investigators searching the home did find a package they were interested in. But he did not yet know what was in it.

Grant says one fingerprint found on the letter sent to a Mississippi judge did not match Curtis.