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Spill claims administrator meeting Fla. lawmakers

In this Jan. 10, 2011 photo, claimants listen to BP oil spill fund administrator Kenneth Feinberg, center, as he speaks at a town hall meeting in Grand Isle, La. President Barack Obama vowed during a White House speech last June that the $20 billion he helped coax out of BP for an oil spill compensation fund would take care of victims "as quickly, as fairly and as transparently as possible." Eight months later, that's not how things look to many people along the Gulf Coast. An Associated Press review that included interviews with legal experts, government officials and more than 300 Gulf residents found a process beset by red tape and delay, and at the center of it all a fund administrator whose ties to BP have raised questions about his independence.

In this Jan. 10, 2011 photo, claimants listen to BP oil spill fund administrator Kenneth Feinberg, center, as he speaks at a town hall meeting in Grand Isle, La. President Barack Obama vowed during a White House speech last June that the $20 billion he helped coax out of BP for an oil spill compensation fund would take care of victims "as quickly, as fairly and as transparently as possible." Eight months later, that's not how things look to many people along the Gulf Coast. An Associated Press review that included interviews with legal experts, government officials and more than 300 Gulf residents found a process beset by red tape and delay, and at the center of it all a fund administrator whose ties to BP have raised questions about his independence.  (AP)

The embattled administrator of a $20 billion fund to pay claims from Gulf of Mexico oil spill victims is meeting with a Florida legislative panel.

Kenneth Feinberg is expected to hear more complaints about payments being too slow, too low or both Friday when he appears before the House Economic Affairs Committee.

Feinberg's been getting plenty of that kind of criticism during his travels along the Gulf Coast, but this week he also got a complaint of another kind from BP.

The British oil giant responsible for the spill caused by the explosion of its Deepwater Horizon rig last year says he's being too generous with its money.

The company contends his methodology artificially inflates future expected losses from the spill.