TRAVEL

Taking a walk on the wild side in Galapagos

It can be easy to get jaded in our see-it-all, do-it-all, have-it-all world. The Galapagos Islands are a reminder of what life once was, what life in some places still is, and what always should be—wild.

Baby Sea Lion in the Brush on Chinese Hat.jpg

On the island called Chinese Hat because of its interesting shape, this baby sea lion sought shade under a pile of brush by the sea.

Jamie Abbott and Jenny Block

Boobies Mating on North Seymour Iasland.jpg

These Blue Footed Boobies were taking part in their ritual dance that includes whistling and foot tapping to get the attention of a potential suitor.

Jamie Abbott and Jenny Block

Galapagos Hawk on Chinese Hat.jpg

This Galapagos Hawk stood sentry on this pole on Chinese Hat perhaps with an eye on his next meal.

Jamie Abbott and Jenny Block

Giant Tortoise Chomping Grass on Santa Cruz Island.jpg

At the El Chato Tortoise Reserve on Santa Cruz Island, this giant tortoise enjoys an afternoon snack.

Jamie Abbott and Jenny Block

Giant Tortoise Munches Grass.jpg

The giant tortoise has plenty of room to graze at the El Chato Tortoise Reserve on Santa Cruz Island.

Jamie Abbott and Jenny Block

Kicker Rock.jpg

The beautiful Kicker Rock is often full of birds, including frigates and boobies.

Jamie Abbott and Jenny Block

Land Iguana Looks out to Sea.jpg

This land iguana appears to be surveying his kingdom although he is more likely resting before his next hunt for food.

Jamie Abbott and Jenny Block

Land Iguana on North Seymour Island.jpg

This land iguana boasts the beautiful colors that are one of several differentiations between the land iguana from the marina iguana.

Jamie Abbott and Jenny Block

Land Iguana on South Padre Island.jpg

South Padre Island is full of land iguanas which can be found eating, sunning, and running across the rocks throughout the island.

Abbott and Jenny Block

Land Iguana on South Plaza Island.jpg

This land iguana is ready to heading for a nearby cactus from which he hopes to pick a ripe and waiting fruit.

Jamie Abbott and Jenny Block

Land Iguna Close-up.jpg

This land iguana is an excellent example of the red coloring that this species often boasts.

Jamie Abbott and Jenny Block

Land Iquana on the rocks.jpg

This land iguana has no cares in the world as he suns himself on Galapagos’ giant rocks.

Jamie Abbott and Jenny Block

Nazca Boobies.jpg

The black “mask” of the Nazca Boobie makes it easy to spot.

Jamie Abbott and Jenny Block

Sally Lightfoot Crabs.jpg

The beautifully colored Sally Lightfoot Crabs can be found throughout the Galapagos Islands.

Jamie Abbott and Jenny Block

Sea Lion Scratching.jpg

If sea lions are not sunning, playing, or eating, you will often find them cratching much like man’s best friend.

Jamie Abbott and Jenny Block

Sea Lion Stare on Chinese Hat.jpg

This Sea Lion on Chinese Hat was as interested in watching Galapagos’ visitors as they were in watching him.

Jamie Abbott and Jenny Block

Seal Lion in Surf.jpg

The sea lions of Galapagos love to play in the surf by themselves, with sea lion friends, and even with visiting guests.

Jamie Abbott and Jenny Block

The Boobies Dance.jpg

These Blue Footed Boobies are mid-dance and whistle as they seek to find a proper mate.

Jamie Abbott and Jenny Block

Turtle Swims Underwater.jpg

Whether you snorkel or dive in the Galapagos, you will likely find yourself sharing the waters with gorgeous sea turtles.

Jamie Abbott and Jenny Block

Underwater Turtle Looks Out.jpg

The turtles of Galapagos often swim close to the surface, peaking out for a quick breath.

Jamie Abbott and Jenny Block

Yellow Crowned Night Heron on Floreana.jpg

This Yellow Crowned Night Heron walks along the shore unbothered by visiting human guests.

Jamie Abbott and Jenny Block

Baby Sea Lion Frown on Outh Plaza Island.jpg

This baby sea lion was waiting patiently for his mother on South Plaza Island while she was out fishing for food.

Jamie Abbott and Jenny Block

Taking a walk on the wild side in Galapagos

It can be easy to get jaded in our see-it-all, do-it-all, have-it-all world. The Galapagos Islands are a reminder of what life once was, what life in some places still is, and what always should be—wild.

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