For those celebrities that want to avoid the paparazzi catching a Lady Gaga-like stumble in stilettos or the bird being flipped from the likes of Patricia Arquette, there’s a new airport experience just for them.

Delta Airline just completed a $220 million, five-year overhaul of its Terminal 5 at Los Angeles International Airport.

In addition to new restaurant and shops for the little people, as well as a renovated Sky Club for elite travelers, the terminal created a paparazzi-proof entrance and exit that protects from them from the camera's prying lens.

“You avoid the entire arrivals process,” says Delta vp Ranjan Goswami told the The Hollywood Reporter. “You won’t see TMZ.”

Here’s how it works: L.A.- bound celebs can request a service called VIP Select, which costs $350 with a first-class ticket. When they arrive, they’ll be greeted on the tarmac in a luxury car that whisks them through a special gate out of the airport through an underground secret location somewhere in the city where they can  be met by their own personal driver, says the Reporter.

“If they’re going off the tarmac, there’s no way around it,” one paparazzo said.

For those flying out of LAX, stars can pull up to the curb, check bags and jump into an elevator that spits them out into a premium security line.  There they’ll be assigned a handler to fend off picture takers and lead them to the renovated Sky Club, where they can relax, have a drink, or show it on of the updated shower suites.

"We're fast on our way to becoming the airline of choice in Los Angeles by understanding what moves L.A. – its most prominent industries, its most desired destinations, and its discerning customers' required amenities for travel," said Delta President Ed Bastian said in a statement.

LAX isn't the only airport to have an oasis for stars avoiding the paparazzi. London's Heathrow's has something similar called Heathrow by Invitation, where high-fliers pay about $2500 to be escorted into a secure area with  lounges, fresh flowers, champagne and catered food. 

Now, if they can just do something about stars melting down mid-flight.