Top 10 countries with deadliest roads for travelers

Published February 21, 2014

| FoxNews.com

Top 10 countries with deadliest roads for travelers

Top 10 countries with deadliest roads for travelers

When going abroad, you don’t always think about the safety of the roads in the country you are traveling to – but you should.

Namibia

45 deaths per 100,000 people per year

Namibia has the highest car-accident death rate in the world, with 45 people killed on the road out of every 100,000 citizens. The country's roads are notoriously dangerous because travellers are not familiar with the landscape and conditions. Drivers run the risk of rolling their vehicles on the African nation's gravel roads.

Thailand

44 deaths per 100,000 people per year

Driving in Thailand is challenging and dangerous. The country has a heavy volume of traffic in cities and its roadways are not well maintained and marked. According to InterNations, an international online community for people who live and work abroad, driving in Thailand “is not for the faint of heart.”

Iran

38 deaths per 100,000 people per year

The U.S. State Department encourages tourists to avoid driving in Iran because Iranian driving is so dangerous there. The tourism agency Let’s Go Iran advises foreign drivers to “take care when crossing the roads, and even greater care when driving on them - Iranian drivers tend to overtake along pavements and any section of the road where there is space.”

Sudan

36 deaths per 100,000 people per year

Australia’s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade offers some suggestions for driving in Sudan, stating that touring the country by car “can be dangerous due to poorly maintained roads, poor vehicle maintenance, dust storms and lack of street lighting…Crowds can gather quickly following accidents and can become violent.”

Swaziland

36 deaths per 100,000 people per year

The U.S. State Department advises foreign drivers to use “extreme caution” when on the road in  Swaziland as local drivers are prone to “excessive speeding and reckless behavior.”  Aside from traffic moving on the opposite side of the road as the U.S., the country also hosts a laundry list of road hazards including “poor lighting, failure to obey traffic signals, presence of pedestrians on roadways, livestock as well as other animals on roadways, slower moving vehicles on the road, large trucks delivering heavy cargo, drunk drivers, drivers texting and/or talking on cell phones, poorly maintained roads, extreme weather (heavy fog, rain, hail), and erratic stopping by other vehicles.”

Venezuela

35 deaths per 100,000 people per year

The U.S. State Department reminds foreign drivers that “defensive driving is an absolute necessity” in Venezuela. Aside from all the dangers from other drivers and poorly maintained roads, there is an extra threat of carjackings. The crime is on the rise in Venezuela.The State Department warns drivers that “if approached, do not resist; robbers are often armed.”

Congo

34 deaths per 100,000 people per year

According to Australia’s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, the Congo is home to “aggressive driving practices and low driving standards.” There are also many military and police roadblocks throughout the country. They are not always clearly marked and criminal groups use roadblocks to rob travelers.

Malawi

32 deaths per 100,000 people per year

Canada’s government tells its citizens to prepare for “poor road conditions, poorly maintained vehicles, and inadequate street lighting” when driving in Malawi. It also warns about dangers along the road like “potholes, pedestrians, animals, abandoned vehicles, and vehicles travelling at night without lights.” Oh, and don’t forget about the threat of armed carjackings, particularly of four-wheel-drive vehicles, because the crime has become an issue in Malawi.

Dominican Republic

32 deaths per 100,000 people per year

The Dominican Republic is home to dicey roads, wild drivers and a car culture where traffic rules are seldom obeyed. Last year, the island nation topped the list as the world's deadliest country for drivers.

Iraq

32 deaths per 100,000 people per year

In general Iraqi roads are dangerous, but Highway 80, from Kuwait City to Basra in Iraq, is especially harrowing. The route went down in history as the "Highway of Death" during the first Gulf War, when a U.S. aircraft in February of 1991, bombed a 2,000-vehicle convoy of retreating Iraqi tanks and trucks.

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