Bulls & Bears

Will ObamaCare reform boost job numbers still higher?

235,000 new jobs were created during President Trump's first full month in office

 

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Republicans Working to Pass New Health Care Bill to Repeal and Replace ObamaCare

Jonas Max Ferris: This could actually be a bigger boon to job creation than ObamaCare was because it is getting rid of employers being coerced into buying insurance for their employees while giving citizens more choice in selecting insurance.

Gary B. Smith: Why did ObamaCare hurt the jobs market? Because it added extra burdens to hiring people. This new plan alleviates some of that problem to some extent.

John Layfield: It will lift the burden of these regulations to some degree. I just don't think this is necessarily a fix because all you are really doing is fixing who pays. It is still going to be very complicated.

Katie Pavlich: The effect of ObamaCare on the economy and jobs was certainly downplayed by the previous administration. There was very little GDP growth. I really do believe that that was tied to ObamaCare. We've already seen businesses talk about how excited they are about cuts to regulations and taxes.

Chuck Rocha: I think this plan is going to help a lot of people get jobs which will be needed because people will have to have two to three jobs because of how much higher insurance will be. My healthcare will probably go down while poor people's will go up.

Report: President Trump Ramps Up Infrastructure Push; Asks Team to Map Out $1 Trillion Plan

Jonas Max Ferris: We've never had a better president to oversee a large project. But again, we do not know how we are going to pay for it.

Gary B. Smith: The problem with these infrastructure bills is that states want to tackle the big name projects, like the bridge to nowhere, but not the really necessary projects. And where do we pay for this? We won't. This is just another boondoggle.

John Layfield: Our debt doubled under President Bush and then doubled again under Obama. We cannot afford for it to go up again. It may need to be done but the economic boom will not be like in years past.

Katie Pavlich: We've been here before. Does anyone remember Obama's shovel ready jobs? This has to be a clean bill that has to go to infrastructure rather than political paybacks.

Chuck Rocha: There's enough infrastructure needs for $4.1 trillion worth of repair so I am definitely in favor of this one.

New Developments in DC Put Focus on Rising Prescription Drug Prices

Jonas Max Ferris: If you want more drugs, don't negotiate the prices but it can be done.

Gary B. Smith: The government can negotiate and it is a tradeoff of what they want. Instead of having so much research and development, we should lessen that, and prices will go down.

John Layfield: We need to introduce competition in the pharmaceutical industry.

Katie Pavlich: If we are talking about opening up the market for competition and ending crony capitalism, I am all for it. The government has no business negotiating drug prices.

Chuck Rocha: Our nation can do our own research and development and still get lower drug prices. Both can be done.

Stock Picks

Gary B. Smith: Spring break means a lot of trips to fast food restaurants. MCD up 20 percent by year end

John Layfield: XOM-20 percent in a year, I do own

Jonas Max Ferris: People are stressed at night about their job! And new sleep drugs have been a disappointment. Good for the sleepytime herbal tea sellers at Hain Celestial Group (HAIN) up 20 percent in 1 year