FOX NEWS SUNDAY

Gov. Mike Pence on final push for the White House; Chief Clinton strategist on campaign's ground game

This is a rush transcript from "Fox News Sunday," November 6, 2016. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated.

CHRIS WALLACE, FOX NEWS ANCHOR:  I’m Chris Wallace.  

With just 48 hours to go until Election Day, we're live in our brand new Fox election headquarters here in New York.  

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

DONALD TRUMP, R-PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE:  We're on the cusp of something that's so amazing.  

WALLACE:  After more than a year of a polarizing campaign, America chooses.  At stake: the presidency, control of Congress, and the future of the country.  

HILLARY CLINTON, D-PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE:  We will have change.  The question is, what kind of change are we going to have?  

WALLACE:  Today the latest on where the polls stand, live reports from the trail, and interviews with both campaigns.  

First, the Republican vice presidential nominee, Indiana Governor Mike Pence.  

GOV. MIKE PENCE, R-IND., VICE PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE:  This country's coming together.  We're going to make Donald Trump the next president of the United States of America.  

WALLACE:  Pence only on "Fox News Sunday."

Then, Hillary Clinton's chief strategist Joel Benenson responds.  We'll discuss the campaign's ground game and last-minute drives to get to 270 electoral votes.  

Plus, we'll ask our Sunday panel about early voting and the impact of the FBI's renewed investigation as Trump and Clinton make their closing arguments.  

TRUMP:  She has no energy.  You know, you need energy to help this country.  

CLINTON:  He has shown us who he is.  Now, we have to decide who we are.  

WALLACE:  All, right now, on "Fox News Sunday."

(END VIDEOTAPE)

WALLACE:  And hello again today from New York City.  We're coming to you from Studio F, our brand new election headquarters here at Fox, where just two days from now, we’ll be reporting the results as America decides who will be the next president of the United States.  

In a few minutes, we'll speak exclusively with Donald Trump's running mate, Governor Mike Pence, and Hillary Clinton's top strategist Joel Benenson.  

But we begin with Fox team coverage.  Mike Emanuel is with the Clinton campaign in Philadelphia.  But we start with senior national correspondent John Roberts, who's in Sioux City, Iowa, a state President Obama carried twice but Trump has a good chance of flipping Tuesday -- John.  

JOHN ROBERTS, FOX NEWS SENIOR NATIONAL CORRESPONDENT:  Good morning to you, Chris.  

Yes, the Real Clear Politics average of polls shows Donald Trump has a lead of about three points here in the state.  A Des Moines Register poll has him up by seven.  

Some tense moments last night in Reno, when the Secret Service for the second time in this campaign leapt on stage to protect the candidate.  Remember it happened back in March in Dayton.  The situation here, they actually whisked him off the stage after somebody at the front of the crowd started yelling "gun, gun".  Apparently, they saw a protester reaching for something in his waistband.  They thought it might have been a weapon.  It turns out that it was only a sign, though.  

Thirty-three-year-old Austyn Crites was detained by the police, later released.  He told a local television station that he is a Republican who does not support Donald Trump, was simply trying to hold up a sign that said Republicans against Trump.  Trump was off the stage for a few minutes but returned shortly thereafter, appearing none the worse for wear.  

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

TRUMP:  We will never be stopped.  Never, ever be stopped.  I want to thank the Secret Service.  These guys are fantastic.  

(END VIDEO CLIP)

ROBERTS:  Donald Trump begins his day in Sioux City, Iowa.  It's the first of ten stops in ten states that he'll do here in the next two days.  A last-second drive to try to get as many people out to the polls as possible, trying to expand the electoral map as well, going into places like Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota, also in Virginia.  

But really, Chris, when you look at the map, it comes down to six states.  Donald Trump leads in five of those six states.  If he were to win those, win Florida, in which Hillary Clinton has a slight lead, and win Maine’s second congressional district, he would get to 270 on the nose and win.  

But consider this, Chris -- if he were to get all that and not win Maine’s second congressional district, it would be a 269 tie.  So, everyone talks about Ohio, Florida, North Carolina, Pennsylvania becoming so important.  This could come down to one congressional district in Maine -- Chris.

WALLACE:  John Roberts reporting from Iowa -- John, thanks for that.  

Now to the Clinton campaign.  Mike Emanuel is live in Philadelphia, and Pennsylvania has voted for the Democrat, a Democrat, in the last six presidential elections.  But the polls are tightening there too -- Mike.  

MIKE EMANUEL, FOX NEWS CORRESPONDENT:  Chris, after weeks of tremendous confidence, the Clinton campaign is revealing some jitters about some typically blue states, including Michigan.  

The Clinton campaign has announced Hillary Clinton, the former President Bill Clinton, and President Obama will all be making campaign stops there in Michigan after seeing the polls there tighten.  The former president will do an event today in Lansing.  Tomorrow, President Obama will try to get out the vote in Ann Arbor.  And the Democratic nominee will be in Grand Rapids tomorrow.  That after both Clintons spent time campaigning in Michigan this past week.

It is worth noting a Republican has not won the Great Lakes State since 1988.  

Last night, Clinton had another big name entertainer helping her to rally here in Philadelphia.  Singer Katy Perry did a get out the vote concert for Clinton.  

Clinton told supporters that already more than 37.5 million people have voted and called on others to do their part.  

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

CLINTON:  I believe they are standing up for a hopeful inclusive vision of America.  And I’m asking you to stand up for that same vision when you come out and vote on November the 8th.  It's your turn, Philadelphia.  

(END VIDEO CLIP)

EMANUEL:  It is worth noting that Pennsylvania is another blue state that Hillary Clinton is spending a lot of time and energy here ahead of Election Day.  She'll return here tomorrow night for a rally with the president and first lady on election eve -- Chris.  

WALLACE:  Mike Emanuel reporting from Philadelphia.  Mike, thank you.  

Joining me now from another battleground state, Virginia, is Trump's running mate, Indiana Governor Mike Pence.

Governor, it's all about the numbers now.  And let's take a look at them in the latest Real Clear Politics average of national polls.  Trump is down two points to Clinton.  And you're losing narrowly in some key swing states.  Down just over a point in Florida, down 2 1/2 points in Pennsylvania, up less than a point in North Carolina.  

There's no question that Trump and you have tightened the race, but the fact is you're still losing.  The question is, how do you go over the top?  What do you do in terms of specifically?  Who, which states, where, to go over the top in these final 48 hours?  

PENCE:  Well, I’ll tell you what, our secret weapon is the American people who are saying enough is enough.  I mean, I was here at a rally last night in Virginia.  We had an overflow crowd that was bigger than some of the rallies that I’ve seen out on the campaign trail over the last several months as I’ve campaigned for Donald Trump.  And, of course, you see the tens of thousands of people coming out with Donald Trump.  He'll have five rallies a day today and tomorrow all across this country.  

We're taking a message to make America great again all across this country.  And I think literally, literally by the hour, the American people are recognizing this election is a choice between change and the status quo.  It's between a more -- stronger, more prosperous America with Donald Trump, and Hillary Clinton is someone who will continue the same failed policies that have weakened America at home and abroad.  Now, we feel tremendous momentum.  

WALLACE:  Governor, Governor --  

PENCE:  This campaign is on offense, and I couldn’t be more excited.  

WALLACE: I do want to get to some specifics.  Hispanics are voting early in big numbers in a number of states.  Florida, North Carolina, Arizona, Nevada.  

Are you worried that the polarizing remarks that your running mate, Donald Trump, has made since his opening announcement may come back to beat him?  

PENCE:  Well, you know, I’m really not.  The truth is that Hispanic-Americans have the same concerns that every other American does.  And we want to get this economy moving again.  We want our country to be safe.  

I was just down in Miami this last weekend, saw overwhelming support for Donald Trump, strong stand for freedom in this hemisphere, standing strongly against what the Obama administration and Hillary Clinton want to continue to do.  

WALLACE:  So, you think all those Hispanics, sir, are coming out to vote for Trump and not for Clinton?  Really?  

PENCE:  No, I’m saying -- I’m saying that the American people want change.  That's Americans coming from every category.  I literally saw it.  I stopped by and had some Cuban coffee at a classic stop in Miami.  Karen and I had a hard time getting through the place with people that were enthusiastic about Donald Trump's stand for a stronger America at home and abroad, getting this economy moving, and repealing Obamacare.  

I talked to leaders in that community who are feeling the crushing weight of Obamacare.  Twenty-five percent increases in the premiums of Obamacare, Chris, in Florida and all across the United States of America.  

The American people know we can do better.  It's going to take change in Washington, D.C., and I really do believe that's why you're seeing people from all across the spectrum, Republicans, independents, many Democrats, and people literally from every community in this country rallying behind Donald Trump more and more by the hour.  

WALLACE:  Trump has been arguing that if Clinton wins, that she faces a criminal investigation and an indictment.  And here he is on the campaign trail.  Take a look.  

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

TRUMP:  If she were to win, it would create an unprecedented constitutional crisis, what a mess.  I mean, we went through it with him with the impeachment, and the lies.  Aren’t we tired of this stuff?

(END VIDEO CLIP)

WALLACE:  But, Governor, Trump has no hard evidence that she's going to face an indictment.  That's overstatement.  

PENCE:  Well, Hillary Clinton and her foundation are under a current investigation by the FBI.  We just found out this morning that she had her maid print off classified information, according to revelations in The New York Post.  

I mean, Chris, the American people know no one is above the law.  We commend the FBI for following the facts and reopening the investigation.  But I think this is part of the way the American people need to count the cost in this election.  

Do we want more of the fast and loose ethics of the Clintons over the last 30 years, or do we want a clean break, do we want to drain the swamp in Washington, D.C., have fundamental ethics reform, and rebuild our military, revive our economy, repeal Obamacare and have appointments to the speak court that will uphold our Constitution?  

This is all part of the equation that I think explains why you see such tremendous momentum in this campaign and why our campaign is literally expanding the map.  We're on offense.  And the Clinton campaign is literally on defense, trying to shore up blue states around the country in the waning days of the campaign.  

WALLACE:  Speaking of criminal investigations and draining the swamp, two of Governor Chris Christie's top aides were convicted of fraud and conspiracy Friday in the Bridgegate case.  And given the fact that there was repeated testimony in that trial that Christie knew all about the effort to close the lanes to the George Washington bridge to punish a political opponent, are you comfortable with Christie as the chairman of the Trump transition team if he's elected?  

PENCE:  Well, what I would tell you is Chris Christie has continued to strongly state his position that he had no knowledge of those actions taken.  And frankly, as he said late in the week, that what those convictions prove is that he was right to immediately fire those people for the actions that they'd taken.

But, look, all of our focus is on Election Day.  I promise you.  And we're grateful for Chris Christie's role in the campaign, and we're going to all keep our head down and work hard to bring a victory for the American people.  

WALLACE:  So, Governor, no chance that he’ll be -- no chance that he'll be replaced after the election?  I mean, you're standing by Chris Christie despite all this evidence?  

PENCE:  Look, there's no changes in personnel here in the waning days of the campaign.  We're 100 percent focused on bringing home a great victory for the American people, and Republicans are coming together, Chris.  I was yesterday with Speaker Paul Ryan in Wisconsin.  A couple days before, I was with Governor Doug Ducey in Arizona.  Last night here in Virginia with Ed Gillespie.  

Republicans are coming home and recognizing that we need to elect Donald Trump as the next president, re-elect a strong Republican majority.  And Republicans are coming home with independence and Democrats at their side, to make sure that Hillary Clinton is never elected president of the United States.  The momentum is palpable out there.  

And I’m looking forward to jumping on a plane, headed to Florida, North Carolina, and New Hampshire today.  Donald Trump is literally everywhere --

(CROSSTALK)

WALLACE:  Well, before you do that, Governor, let me ask you one final question, if I may.  This has been a divisive and negative campaign.  You talk about the party coming together.

I want to ask you about the country coming together.

PENCE:  Yes.

WALLACE:  I think you'd agree, one of the strengths of our democracy is when the election is over, no matter how ugly, the loser graciously concedes to the winner and we all rally around the new president, whoever that turns out to be.  Donald Trump has said different things at different times.  I want you to clear this up for us.  

Can you guarantee that if there's a clear winner on election night and if -- and I repeat if, I know you’re going to say, well, he’s going to win -- but if Donald Trump should be the loser, can you guarantee that he will concede to Hillary Clinton and accept the result of the election and the judgment of the American people?  

PENCE:  Well, thanks for anticipating my answer.  Donald Trump is going to win this election.  He'll be more than happy to accept the results.  But, look --

(CROSSTALK)

WALLACE:  Can you guarantee that he will put this behind us -- sir, can you guarantee he'll put this behind us and accept the result?

PENCE:  Chris, the campaign -- yes, the campaign has made it very clear, that, you know, a clear -- a clear outcome obviously both sides will accept.  But I think both campaigns have also been very clear that, you know, in the event of disputed results, they reserve all legal rights and remedies.  

But the truth is that this is such an exciting time in the life of our country.  The way this country is going to come together is when we deliver the change that the American people long to see.  When we -- when we rebuild our military, we're standing tall in the world, when we revive our economy, when we have a Supreme Court that upholds our liberty, and we see America growing and prospering again.  

WALLACE:  Governor --  

PENCE:  When we see America great again, America is going to be united and we're going to move our nation forward.  

WALLACE:  Governor Pence, thank you.  Thanks for your time, especially in this final weekend.  And safe travels on the campaign trail in these last 48 hours, sir.  

PENCE:  Thank you, Chris.  

PENCE:  Coming up, Hillary Clinton's top strategist Joel Benenson is here in Studio F.  And we'll check in with Bill Hemmer upstairs on the data deck with a look at the possible paths to the all-important 270 electoral votes -- as "Fox News Sunday" reports live from America's Election Headquarters.  

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

WALLACE:  And we're back at Fox News Election Headquarters in New York City.  

As the polls tighten just hours before Election Day, Hillary Clinton is fighting off Donald Trump's late charge.  

Joining me now is Clinton's top strategist, Joel Benenson.  

And, Joel, welcome back to "Fox News Sunday."

JOEL BENENSON, CLINTON TOP STRATEGIST:  Thanks for having me, Chris.

WALLACE:  As I pointed out to Mike Pence, while they've tightened the race, they're still losing, the Trump side, but there are some numbers out there that are troubling to your side.  I want to ask you about those.  

In the latest Fox poll, 71 percent of Trump voters strongly support him versus 65 percent of Clinton voters.  Sixty-three percent of Trump supporters are extremely interested in the race.  For Clinton, it's 54 percent.  

And after news of the FBI investigation, 21 percent of independents are less likely to vote for Clinton.  Joel, there seems to be an enthusiasm gap, and the FBI investigation seems to be hurting Clinton.  

BENENSON:  No, I think there are a lot of ways to measure enthusiasm.  You know, there's also a Washington Post poll.  And they've been tracking numbers historically.  Fifty-six percent of Hillary Clinton's voter saying they're voting for her as opposed to against her opponent.  Kind of on par with people like Al Gore and George Bush, Bill Clinton in '96.  

That same poll shows Donald Trump at 41 percent.  That is historically and significantly lower than most presidential candidates.  

WALLACE:  Do you think the FBI announcement, now a week and a half old, has hurt Clinton?  

BENENSON:  No, I don't.  I think it obviously occupied a lot of air space, but I think, you know, we've been knocking on doors.  We have had lines all weekend at our phone banks with people waiting to get in.  We've knocked on 2 million doors this weekend.  

I think where you're seeing the enthusiasm is in the early vote.  Our people are going out to vote, where the early vote is going on.  States like Florida, states like Nevada.  Very strong numbers and not just with our base Democratic voters, but we think we're seeing a surge with suburban women, younger people, millennials, broadening our coalition.  

WALLACE:  OK.  Having said all of that, Clinton has changed her game plan these last few days.  I always say the most precious commodity in the last week of a campaign is the candidate's time.  

She went to Detroit to campaign on Friday, which is somewhat surprising.  She's going back there again to Michigan, to Grand Rapids, on Monday.  You're now running TV ads in Virginia and Colorado and New Mexico.  Those were all states that were off the board for Trump two weeks ago.  

BENENSON:  Well, here’s -- going to Michigan, by the way, is very consistent with our plan because Michigan is one of the states we call game day states.  No early voting.  We have to make sure we get there in the last few days, keep people ginned up, getting them out to vote.  That's what you're seeing in some of these states.  

In terms of ads in states like Virginia and Colorado, where we do feel we've got a winning margin there, we've had actually in the last two weeks a surge of resources, things have opened up for us.  More money is coming in.  Our digital fundraising has been great.  People are supporting the campaign.  

And we're going to put those to work because our job here is every state we make harder for Donald Trump to win, makes his path narrower and narrower.  We've always wanted to be in a position, Chris, where we're not trying to thread a needle, we're not drawing an inside straight.  And so, we're playing offense in all of our states.  

WALLACE:  Well, let's talk about that.  You heard me ask Mike Pence, how does he get over the top?  

BENENSON:  Sure.

WALLACE:  Let's go up to the data deck, up on the second floor here in our election headquarters, where Bill Hemmer is standing by to show us a possible Trump path to 270 and then, Joel, we'll come back and talk to you on the other side.  

Bill?

BILL HEMMER, FOX NEWS CORRESPONDENT:  Chris, hello.  And it's the mezzanine level.  We've super-sized the billboard this year for 2016.  

You see all the states in gray on the map.  Those are the states where it's too close to call, the battleground states we believe as of today that's where the election stands.  

Go back four years ago when Mitt Romney lost to Barack Obama.  Romney flipped two states that year.  He made Indiana Republican again.  So, too, in North Carolina.  

If you assume that Trump at a minimum has to hold all the Romney states, this is what it could look like -- 16 electoral votes in Georgia.  It's 11 in Arizona.  It's 15 in North Carolina.  And late on Friday, the Trump team tells me they feel very good about where they are in North Carolina.  More on that in a moment.  

He'd have to flip the six in Iowa.  He'd have to flip 18 in Ohio, 29 in Florida, and still under this scenario, he's 11 electoral votes short.  So, where does he go?  

If he were to win Pennsylvania, that would make him president.  If he were to win Michigan, that would make him president.  If he were to win a combination of, say, New Hampshire and Colorado, that would do it.  Or New Hampshire and perhaps Nevada would get him very close at 269 under that particular map.  

However, if the Clinton team finds success on the East Coast, maybe in Florida, which could be deadly for the Trump team, or possibly turning North Carolina blue again, you start to see the challenge for Trump as he drops down to 244 electoral votes.  That means under that scenario, he would have to win Pennsylvania and somewhere else.  He would have to win a Michigan and somewhere else.  Two states, by the way, that have not gone Republican in 28 years.  

The point is on all this, there's a number of different options that you can map out and gain for Tuesday night.  Trump, it's not impossible.  He has a number of ways that he can do it.  But it's much more difficult.  

As it stands today, Chris, it is much easier for Hillary Clinton based on the map that we're watching.  

Back to you.  

WALLACE:  Bill, thank you.  

Well, you heard about possible paths.  And all of them are difficulties.  He’s kind of -- you talked about the political equivalent of drawing to the inside straight.  He kind of has to do it.  Where are the big kinks in that scenario?  

BENENSON:  In his scenario?  

WALLACE:  Yes.  

BENENSON:  Pennsylvania.  Starts with Pennsylvania, number one.  Pennsylvania is a strong state for us.  We're going to be spending time there, as Bill pointed out solidly Democratic for six elections or so.  

Because if he doesn't win there, he has to win all four of the big other states that Bill just talked about -- Ohio, Florida, North Carolina, Michigan.  He's not in a position to win all four of those.  He just isn't.  

I think that some of these are close, no question about it.  He, I think, described the scenario I did.  It's not over until the fat lady sings, as they say, right?  And -- but we're going into election day playing offense, keeping them on defense with states like Arizona that we never played in before, not -- neither in the Obama election.

So, we feel good when we're on offense.  We think we're in good shape.  And I think it's because voters around the country are really rejecting the divisive rhetoric that they've heard from Donald Trump throughout this campaign.  

WALLACE:  OK.  That is the concern for Trump, the concern for the Clinton camp is the honesty and trustworthiness factor and obviously the renewed FBI investigation, as an issue.  And I want to discuss that for a moment.  

Back in March of 2015, Hillary Clinton told the country that she had turned over all of her work-related e-mails to the State Department.  Here she is.  

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

CLINTON:  I responded right away and provided all my e-mails that could possibly be work related, which totaled roughly 55,000 printed pages.  

(END VIDEO CLIP)

WALLACE:  But the week before a Clinton adviser sent out this e-mail, "If there is a release of the 55,000, are there others that are not being released?"  And here was your answer, Joel, "Definitely."  Now, Clinton --

(LAUGHTER)

BENENSON:  Actually, Chris.  The definitely wasn't to that.  There's a string of e-mails there.  It was saying to the previous e-mail that we should release all the e-mails.  I was saying definitely.  There was an interspersed e-mail in there.  I was responding to the previous one that said definitely.  

WALLACE:  Why didn't they release all the e-mails?  They still got you (ph).

(CROSSTALK)

BENENSON:  I think they released all the ones they believed they had at the time.  I think during the course of the process -- and Director Comey said there may be some others, and if there are, they'll find them and be turn over.  

But let me go back to your fundamental question here.  You raise a question of trust.  And I hate to, I apologize for bringing up a Washington Post/ABC poll.  But they asked, which one of these two people has stronger moral character?  And by 46 to 38 vote, it’s an eight-point spread, Hillary Clinton is --

(CROSSTALK)

WALLACE:  As you know, as a pollster, it depends on the question that’s asked.  

BENENSON:  Well, it was, but strong moral character is a strong test for the president of the United States as well.  And I think people -- looking at these two people, we have an eight-point advantage there and people are looking at this through the prism of who are these two people.  What have they both done in their lives that will make me count on them --

(CROSSTALK)

WALLACE:  OK, I got that.  And I want to ask you a question about the e-mails because --  

BENENSON:  Because you've never asked me before.  No, go ahead.  

(CROSSTALK)

WALLACE:  Well, I haven't asked you often about the e-mails.  The argument that she made and that the campaign has made that all of the deleted e-mails were personal, they were about her yoga, about Chelsea’s wedding.  A question I have for you is, were e-mails about the Clinton foundation considered personal, and were they deleted?  

BENENSON:  Chris, I’m not sure how they were considered.  What I know is that whoever is looking at all the e-mails has been looking at it for years, 15 months, almost a year and a half now, right?  They've said they're going to look at any other e-mails that come up.  And let them make a judgment.  

When Director Comey spoke, he had no access to other e-mails.  He hasn't seen them.  He went out on a limb.  He's been criticized by both Democratic and Republican former law enforcement officials who said this was inappropriate to do at this point, particularly when he had no facts and no information.  

Look, I think that voters are going to go to the polls two days from now, they're going to factor all this information in.  They're going to make the decision on which one of these people will really make America the kind of country they want to have.  

WALLACE:  OK.  One last question: in February of 2015, there were reports that foreign donations to the Clinton Foundation were on the rise, and that resulted in a string of e-mails again I want to talk about.  

Here was your recommendation about foreign government donations to the Clinton Foundation, "Stop taking foreign government money.  Is that possible?  If not, we're going to be very vulnerable on that throughout.  And I think our opponents and some on our side will say it is unseemly for a potential U.S. president taking money from foreign governments for her private foundation."

Joel, you knew this was a problem, but as we sit here today, the Clinton Foundation continues to take money from foreign governments.  

BENENSON:  Well, two things.  One, I’m not going to authenticate any of these e-mails.  We know we were hacked through Russian interference.  

WALLACE:  OK.  

BENENSON:  What the Clintons have said is they announced the steps they will take if Hillary Clinton is elected president.  They are very clear.

(CROSSTALK)

WALLACE:  But you were saying this in 2015.  Why not --

BENENSON:  This foundation -- because this foundation helps millions of people around the world, President Clinton has put to work at that foundation what he learned as president with 11 million people on life-saving AIDS drugs.  

WALLACE:  So, you don't think it's unseemly?  

BENENSON:  I think that they are -- the Clintons have announced what steps they would take if she's elected on Tuesday, which I believe she will be, about the steps they will take to change the way the foundation will operate if she's president of the United States.  What they don't want to have happen is for millions of people who are being saved with life-saving drugs, kids getting better food in schools --

(CROSSTALK)

WALLACE:  But that was 2015 and you called it unseemly.  

BENENSON:  Well, I said I’m not going to authenticate any of these e-mails that were hacked by Russians.  I’m going to talk about what the foundation has done and how they’ve addressed what they will do going forward.

WALLACE:  Joel, thank you.  Thanks for coming in today.  

BENENSON:  Thank you.  Appreciate it.  

WALLACE:  Always good to talk with you.  

BENENSON:  Good to see you, Chris.

WALLACE:  Up next, we'll bring in our Sunday group to discuss what we should be looking for in these final hours of campaign 2016.  

Much more to come from Fox News election headquarters.  Here's a look at what we call the chandelier -- uh-oh -- where we’ll be making race calls throughout election night. We'll be right back.

We’ll be right back.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

WALLACE: Coming up, Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton make their closing arguments.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

TRUMP: The vote that you cast will be the most important vote of your life.

CLINTON: I have spent my career fighting for kids and families. And if you elect me, that's what I'll keep doing.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

WALLACE: We'll ask our Sunday group how they need to wrap up the race, next.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

TRUMP: Stay on point, Donald. Stay on point. No side tracks, Donald. Nice and easy. Nice --

CLINTON: His campaign probably put that in the teleprompter. Stay on point, Donald. Stay on point.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

WALLACE:  In these final days of the campaign, Donald Trump giving himself a pep talk and Hillary Clinton making fun of it.

And it's time now for our Sunday group. GOP strategist Karl Rove, Bob Woodward of The Washington Post, Dana Perino, co-host of "The Five" and "I’ll Tell You What," and the hardest working woman in show business is also the author of the new book "Let Me Tell You About Jasper," and Fox News political analyst Juan Williams.

Well, Karl, you've looked at all the polls, you’ve crunched the numbers on early voting, you’ve explored all the paths to 270, where is this race now?

KARL ROVE, FORMER BUSH WHITE HOUSE ADVISOR: Donald Trump leads in the Mitt Romney states with 206 Electoral College votes, albeit it in one of those states, North Carolina, by only a point. But he also leads in Ohio, Nevada, New Hampshire, and Iowa. If he gets there, it's 240 electoral votes. Still short of the 270, but within striking distance.

Twenty-nine electoral votes up in Florida. Today she leads by one. But Republicans have had good numbers in early voting there. They're down only 7,000 in the early voting. Four years ago, when Barack Obama won the state by 74,000, they were down 104,000 at the end of early voting. So Florida is very much up for grabs.

I thought it was interesting that when you asked Joel Baronson --

WALLACE:  Benenson.

ROVE: Benenson about the most important states, he said Pennsylvania, not Florida. That seems to me that might be an indication that they're concerned about Florida. It is very much up for grabs. And the signal in the early voting points to a narrow Trump victory there.

WALLACE:  Juan, what's your sense? Is Trump as close as Karl says? Is this race slipping away for Clinton?

JUAN WILLIAMS, FOX NEWS POLITICAL ANALYST: I don't know if it's slipping away, but I think that if you looked a week ago, it was more like five to six percentage points. In the national polls this morning, "Wall Street Journal" has her up four. ABC/"Washington Post" has her at five. Fox News Channel, our polling, has her up two. So what you see is that it has tightened.

But most of the tightening has been a result of Republican consolidation of their vote. Republicans previously were about 70 percent -- 75 percent to 80 percent. Now they're up to 85 percent behind Donald Trump. I think, obviously, people like Paul Ryan, the speaker, Ted Cruz's former rival, and bitter rival, have now decided they're voting for Donald Trump. I think that's a signal, despite, you know, their concern about lack of qualifications, character, whatever.

So, at the moment, you have it like, you know, she is in a position where most Americans, according to the Fox poll, think she's going to win, 56 percent. Only a third, 35 percent, think he will win. And the difference at this juncture, I think, is ground game. She really has a ground game. I don't think anybody thinks he has a sufficient ground game to push the numbers one or two points at the very end.

WALLACE:  I want to turn to one of the biggest developments over these last ten days, and that was FBI Director Comey's shocking announcement that he's reopening the criminal investigation into Hillary Clinton and the e-mails. Now, the White House said that President Obama wasn't going to weigh in on whether this was a good idea or not, and then President Obama did weigh in. Here he is.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

BARACK OBAMA, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES: I do think that there is a norm that, you know, when there are investigations, we don't operate on innuendo, we don't operate on incomplete information, we don't operate on leaks.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

WALLACE:  Bob Woodward, as someone who has been reporting on the FBI since Watergate, what do you think of the role that the FBI and the Justice Department and apparently a lot of leaks in a kind of a war between the two agencies, of their role these last days?

BOB WOODWARD, THE WASHINGTON POST: I -- I -- I think it will be many months or years before we really unravel what happened in this. But what Director Comey did is extraordinary, both times, back in July saying that she would not be charged. An old FBI hand, one of the iconic figures, told me the other day he thinks that's the first time the FBI made a prosecutorial decision. Normally it's the Justice Department that does this. So it's -- it’s a big deal.

I don't know whether it changes the race. I mean the number -- numbers that Karl has are -- are pretty convincing. I -- I think the question to kind of ask is, if Trump does win, how -- how is that possible? What's been missed? And I think I find in travels around the country talking to groups from Texas to Florida to New York, people don't trust the polls. And they look at voting as much more personal. They don't like the idea, oh, I'm in a demographic group, so I'm going to go this way. They want to decide themselves. And so there are people in demographic groups who will say, no, I'm not going with my group.

WALLACE:  So you think they're lying?

WOODWARD: I -- I think --

WALLACE:  I mean lying to the pollsters.

WOODWARD: I -- I think that's quite possible. I think also that, you know, you do all this by land line or cell phone, what sort of data do you get. I mean even The New York Times today is saying the possibility of Trump winning is real. So why are people hedging? Because they're unsure, aren't they?

WALLACE:  Let me bring in Dana and your thoughts, one, about the state of the race, and, two, the FBI role, what do you think of it, and do you think it has hurt, whether you like it or not, do you think it has hurt Clinton?

DANA PERINO, CO-HOST, "THE FIVE": I think that it reaffirmed pre-existing beliefs about Hillary Clinton. So if you weren't going to vote for her and thought she was dishonest, that reaffirmed it and you might even be more encouraged to vote for it. and I think that that has happened at the same time, as Juan was saying, that Republicans said, all right, we might not think this is the best candidate we could have had, but by gosh we're going to go out and vote for him because that's what Republicans do.

On the other side, I agree with Bob, I think it could take years to find out what happened at the FBI. But whoever wins the presidency has got to figure out a way to reassure Americans and restore confidence in the FBI because while they're doing this they also have said in the past year, James Comey, the director, said they have 50 states that they're looking at with open investigations with ISIS terrorist related things. So they have things to do.

I think that two things might happen. Republicans have been trying to get Pennsylvania for a long time. And it's always the one that got away.

WALLACE:  Right.

PERINO: Wisconsin’s in that category as well.

WALLACE:  1988.

PERINO: That's right. And for Democrats, I think that they still believe that Georgia and Arizona are the two. And I think they're actually probably going to end up with Republicans not winning in Pennsylvania and Wisconsin and Democrats not winning in Georgia or Arizona.

WALLACE:  Karl, I’ve got about a minute left in this segment and I want to go back to the -- the narrative this weekend, and that is that the Hispanic vote is coming out in an unusually large numbers and the assumption is because of Trump's very polarizing remarks since his announcement that they're voting against him and for Hillary Clinton and could be the deciding factor.

ROVE: Yes, that's half the important narrative. What we're also seeing is a decline in the African-American turnout. We're seeing it, for example, in Florida and North Carolina, where it is down. The African-American turnout down in those states. Hispanic turnout up.

The -- the problem for the Democrats is, every time they lose 1 percent of Democratic turnout among African-Americans, they lose about nine-tenths of a point of support because they vote 90 percent plus for Democrats. Every time they gain a percentage point among Hispanics, they gain about seven-tenths of a percent. So for Democrats they’re hoping the Hispanic turnout is rising significantly more than Democratic turnout is dropping among African-Americans.

Let me make one more point. Pennsylvania, there have been 42 polls since October of 2015. Donald Trump has not led in a single one. Sixteen polls since the end of September in Colorado, not led in a single one. Michigan, 37 polls since October of last year, hasn't led in a single one. He got an uphill climb here at the end. I can see him getting to 240, but after that it's going to be a stuff slog (ph).

WALLACE:  And let me tell you, he speaks as somebody who tried for Pennsylvania over and over.

ROVE: It broke my heart twice. It broke my heart twice.

WALLACE:  All right, we have to take a break here. Up next, we'll break down the battle for control of the Senate and what happens on Wednesday, can we put this ugly election behind us?

Plus, what would you like to ask the panel about whether the country will rally around our new president, whoever he or she is? Just go to Facebook or Twitter @foxnewssunday, and we may use your question on the air.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

CLINTON: I'm very excited. There are just three days left in this most consequential election. Are you ready?

TRUMP: I'm asking you to dream big because your vote -- think of this, we are just three days away. Do you believe it?

(END VIDEO CLIP)

WALLACE:  And now we're just two days away. Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump making their closing arguments to voters in these final hours before Election Day.

And we're back now with the panel.

Well, it's not just the White House that's at stake on election night. Also control of the Senate and the fact is that the Democrats need a net pickup of five seats or four seats, plus vice president Tim Kaine to break any ties to take control. We have our resident Senate watcher, Karl Rove.

What's it look like for you, and what are the key states you're going to be looking at?

ROVE: Well, look, I think it's going to come down -- the Republicans, I think, are going to bank five seats that they need and it's going to come down to winning two out of the remaining seats. The -- the -- the three best shots are going to be --

WALLACE:  You mean the Democrats are going to bank?

ROVE: No, the Republicans are going to bank five seats.

WALLACE:  OK.

ROVE: Arizona, Ohio, Florida, Missouri, and Indiana.

WALLACE:  Right.

ROVE: And that will get them to 49.

WALLACE:  Oh, OK.

ROVE: And the question is, how do they get to 51. And -- and the -- the three best shots they've got, and they’ve got to take two out of three, are, first, North Carolina. Richard Burr versus Deborah Ross. Burr leads by 1.5 in Real Clear Politics. Interesting to watch early vote. Democrats, as of Friday evening, 12,000 fewer Democrat early votes than in 2012. Republicans, 151,000 more. This is in a state Romney won by 95,000.

WALLACE:  All right, real quickly, Burr is the incumbent. That's a Republican seat. So the key is, can he hold on.

ROVE: Can he hold on to -- all three of these are holding on. Or, excuse me, two of the -- two of them are holding on. The second one is New Hampshire, Kelly Ayotte versus Maggie Hassan. Ayotte, the incumbent Republican. Hassan the Democratic governor. Ayotte is up 2.4 points. She's led in seven of the last ten polls in October. This will be the most expensive per capita Senate race in the history of America. $120 million will be spent. It is (INAUDIBLE).

WALLACE:  And, again, that's a Republican seat that they’re trying to hold on to.

ROVE: A Republican seat they've got to hold.

WALLACE:  And then there's one seat that's a Democrat seat, Henry Reid -- Harry Reid --

ROVE: Right.

WALLACE:  The majority leader is retiring and Nevada’s that.

ROVE: Yes. Republican Congressman Joe Heck versus former Attorney General Masto. Heck leads by 1.4 in the Real Clear Politics average. He's led in seven of the 13 polls since October 1. The GOP has cut the Democratic lead in early voting by only 2,000. But this could be just like 2012. Barack Obama took the state in the presidential race and Republican Senator Dean Heller was elected.

WALLACE:  So you think Republicans definitely get to 49. The question is can they get to 51.

ROVE: Fifty-one, right.

WALLACE:  Or 50 with president -- or vice president Mike Pence.

ROVE: Right. Always -- always good to have an insurance policy, though.

And, look, there are a couple of other races out there, but these are their best shots.

WALLACE:  Juan, who takes the Senate? And do Republicans hold on to the House?

WILLIAMS: I think it's close to a coin flip. But I would just point out that, you know, there are other prognosticators. New York Times, Charlie Cook, I have a lot of respect for, and they, at the moment, give the Democrats a slight advantage. When you look at states like Illinois with Kirk, Wisconsin with Johnson, Pennsylvania with Toomey, I thought Toomey was going to come back, but it doesn't look that way in the polls at the moment. So I would look, as Karl was talking about, Missouri I think is very close. North Carolina. I think Nevada is still in play. And Indiana at the moment it looks like Todd Young has taken the lead. But I -- I would never, ever turn --

WALLACE:  And that's a Republican state that the Democrats are trying to take (INAUDIBLE).

WILLIAMS: Right, that Evan Bayh is trying to come back. So what you get is a very tight race right now.

WALLACE:  All right. Let's turn because we want to ask you -- we asked you for questions for the panel and we got a bunch on the issue of what's the country going to look like and will they unite around our next president. And most of the answers, frankly, or most of the questions, were pretty pessimistic. They kind of came in the -- it was like "Jeopardy," they came in the form of answers.

Rose Mead sent this on Facebook, "no matter who is elected, we are a fractured nation. Half of our nation has values and a world view that is diametrically opposed to the other. There’s no uniting the two."

Dana, do you share that pessimism?

PERINO: I think that today I understand why people feel that way, but I also have seen the power of the ability, the American people, over and over again, to have a peaceful transition of power. There's going to be a lot riding on whoever the president is just to decide to do that. And I wish I was on their communications team, because I have some thoughts of how they might do that.

I also feel that people -- if you look at that "New York Times" poll, 80 percent of the electorate is disgusted with this election. I think that come Thanksgiving, when people gather with their families, they'll remember that America is not just defined by its president, but by her citizens, and that they'll have a lot to be thankful for and whoever the next president is will get support.

WALLACE:  Bob, you and I, as the two old codgers, or statesmen --

WOODWARD: Right, we can’t use that word.

WALLACE:  We can’t? We -- we -- codgers -- there’s a codger (INAUDIBLE) that’s wrong?

WOODWARD: OK. I was thinking of another one.

WALLACE:  OK. We have lived through a lot of divided times, Vietnam, Watergate, the 2000 election when a lot of people thought Bush's election was illegitimate. What are your thoughts about the prospect for this country uniting behind Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump?

WOODWARD: I think it's a matter of tone whoever becomes president. If -- assuming Hillary Clinton is going to win, she can't come in with the old retreads, all appointments, all the people who have been there and Clinton administrations. There's been a lot of criticism, and you see it in these e-mails, about the team around her, is it going to be -- can she -- could she say a new leaf. The same with Trump. If he, for some reason, becomes president, is he then --

WALLACE:  It wouldn't be some reason. It would be because he got the majority of the vote.

WOODWARD: Yes, yes, but it’s -- you know, I mean Karl makes a convincing case, but, you know, I -- I think there's that unknown factor in there. And then he would have to do something big and dramatic and hopefully inside he would have the feeling, I broke the bank, now I'm president, let's do everything right, instead of this sexism and racism, which has been out of his own mouth for a long time.

WALLACE:  Karl, nobody came in under a bigger cloud as the new president than George W. Bush with that election and the recount and the month and the Supreme Court. How did you guys try to unite the country when he finally was the winner?

ROVE: The first person he called from the -- in the United States Senate was Ted Kennedy, first member of the House he called, Democrat George Miller of California, and talked to them about the issues that they could together work on. But it wasn't easy. And it requires presidential leadership from the start.

Dick Gephardt, who was a good man, went on Tim Russert’s "Meet the Press" and twice, after the Supreme Court came down on the 18th of September, twice was asked, is Bush the legitimate president of the United States, and he refused to answer the question. And yet, by June, by setting the right tone and by reaching out to the other side, Bush had passed his tax cuts in the Senate with a quarter of the Democrats in the Senate voting for it, by spending the time and the energy and the effort to specifically unite the country. Whoever this -- if Donald Trump wins, he's going to need a Norm Mineta, a Democrat who will serve in his cabinet. If she wins, she's going to need a Bob Gates, somebody who's a Republican or a Republican identifier to serve in her cabinet.

WILLIAMS: let me just say quickly, I think the -- in the healing process, there's no getting away, even on this Sunday morning, from saying something needs to be done about what happened with the Russians and the trouble at the FBI is not going to be resolved without some serious effort by whoever’s coming in.

WALLACE:  Well, we're going to have plenty of time to discuss that next week.

Thank you, panel. See you next Sunday back in Washington.

Up next, the candidates try to -- try to stay focused in these final days on the trail as "Fox News Sunday" continues from our election headquarters in midtown Manhattan.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

WALLACE:  And we're back in our election night studio with a look at the poll closings in the tower. Another part of our Fox News election headquarters. And we'll be tracking those poll closings, of course, closely throughout the evening.

Well, this is marathon Sunday here in New York. And much like the runners winding through the city, the presidential candidates have been crisscrossing the country in their own sprint to the finish. And with just two days left, the pace is picking up on the trail.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

CLINTON: The last time the Cubs won, women couldn't vote. I think women are making up for that in this election.

TRUMP: I've had a great life, and now I want to give back to the country that I love. It's time. We have to -- we have to give back.

PENCE: (INAUDIBLE).

SEN. TIM KAINE, D-VA., VICE PRESIDENTIAL NOMINEE: (INAUDIBLE).

TRUMP: I saw somebody backstage. Big, strong, powerful. I said to the guys, you think I could take this guy in a fight? You think I could take him?

BILL CLINTON, FORMER U.S. PRESIDENT: For a year and a half, Americans have had acid poured down their throat.

CROWD (chanting): USA! USA!

BARACK OBAMA, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES: That guy didn’t have a -- had never won a baseball hat or a seed (ph) hat until he started selling them.

PENCE: We can't trust Hillary Clinton with our healthcare anymore than we can trust her with classified information.

CLINTON: I stopped in to check him out. What are y'all doing?

MELANIA TRUMP, DONALD TRUMP’S WIFE: It is never OK when a 12-year-old girl or boy is mocked, bullied, or attacked.

JOE BIDEN, VICE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES: Doing what Donald Trump did, getting up at 3:30 in the morning and tweeting vitriol about a woman's body.

TRUMP: I didn't have to bring J-lo or Jay-z. The only way she gets anybody.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE (singing): I got the eye of the tiger, a fighter, dancing through the fire, 'cause I am the champion --

TRUMP: Massive illegal immigration and economic and foreign policies that have bled our country dry.

BRAD PAISLEY AND CARRIE UNDERWOOD (singing): The election is taking forever and ever forever and ever --

UNDERWOOD: OK, we get it.

PAISLEY AND UNDERWOOD (singing): Make it end.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

WALLACE:  And one way or another, it will end in just two days.

Be sure to tune to Fox News Channel for election coverage all day and night Tuesday. Megyn Kelly and Brett Baier will anchor our coverage, including all of us on the Fox News political team. And on the broadcast side, Shepard Smith will be steering the ship on your local Fox station starting at 7:00 p.m. Eastern.

And that's it for today. Have a great week and we'll see you next "Fox News Sunday."

Content and Programming Copyright 2016 Fox News Network, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Copyright 2016 CQ-Roll Call, Inc. All materials herein are protected by United States copyright law and may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, displayed, published or broadcast without the prior written permission of CQ-Roll Call. You may not alter or remove any trademark, copyright or other notice from copies of the content.