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Gov. Cuomo: No doubt train came into station too fast

This is a rush transcript from "Your World," September 29, 2016. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated.

NEIL CAVUTO, HOST: If you were to look at what is behind after that train crash in Hoboken, New Jersey, you would be surprised that only one person died, still over 100 injured. But it looks like it could have been a lot worse.

With us right now, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo.

Governor, thank you for joining us.

GOV. ANDREW CUOMO, D-N.Y.: Pleasure to be with you, Neil

CAVUTO: OK.

I should explain to folks there's a slight audio delay here. So, we will go through here.

But, Governor, have you learned anything new? Have we learned anything about what might have caused this?

CUOMO: No.

We have a lot of speculation about what might have caused it. We know what happened. We don't know why, Neil. This was a train that started in Spring Valley, New York. It then goes into New Jersey and makes stops in New Jersey, ends in Hoboken.

There's no doubt that it came into the station too fast. Some people estimate 35 miles an hour. It went through they call the bump stop, the end post at the end of the track, went over the platform, stopped just shy of the wall of the station.

And you said it exactly right. It took down I-beams in the middle.  And the canopy rooftop collapsed. And that is what caused the fatality.

When you see the damage and destruction, and you know how many people were on that platform, I'll tell you, it's amazing that there was only one fatality. It could have been much, much worse. The injuries, about 114, are the people who were on the train who were injured from at the abrupt stop.

But we don't yet what it was. Was it was equipment failure? Was it human error? Was -- the medical condition for the conductor? All we have is speculation. The NTSB is coming up now. They will open the black box, the event recorder.

And then we will get a sense of what happened from the event recorder, and the conductor is also being cooperative. He is injured, but he is cooperative. And they will debrief him, and we will have a better idea then.

CAVUTO: Do we know about his health status going into this? Some people have wondered, was it fatigue? Did anything like that get covered?

CUOMO: None that we know of, Neil, nothing that we know of.

CAVUTO: Yes.  

CUOMO: And you really won't know until you have all the facts.

Unfortunately, I have gone through this a couple of times with train accidents. A lot of people have a lot of theories early on that are disproven when you actually get the facts.

So, you know, you do what you can when you can. We're doing the investigation. We're getting the facts. And, in the meantime, I'm working hand in glove with Governor Christie. And we're combining the resources of both systems, the Jersey system and the New York system, to get past tonight's rush home and the commute tomorrow morning.

So, the good news is, the path train is running from Hoboken to New York City. We will use our -- the New York system, the Metro-North system, to accept New Jersey transit riders. And I think you will see a coordination between the two systems that we have never actually seen before.

CAVUTO: Governor, I noticed that, once again, seeing you and New Jersey Governor Chris Christie talking to the press on a tragedy, that you have had to, sadly, do that a lot. How do your offices coordinate this sort of thing?  

CUOMO: Unfortunately, too well, Neil. We have had too much practice.

My father was governor for 12 years in New York, as you know. He had about six disasters in 12 years. I have probably had double that in half the time.

I have worked with Chris Christie on Hurricane Irene, Storm Sandy, terrorist attacks, bombings, train accidents. So, we have a personal relationship that is forged from the worst of times, actually.

Our teams also know each other very well. My police department knows his police department, et cetera. Our executive staff works together. So, that is the good news, that you have an unprecedented coordinated regional approach here, right?

Jersey is right on the other side of the Hudson River. We share New York Harbor with New Jersey. And we have been great allies for each other, and that's why this happened in Hoboken, New Jersey. The train started in New York. There were New Yorkers on the train, but, more than that, if there's a problem in New Jersey, New York is there for the people in New Jersey, and vice versa.

And we have had a number of disasters, incidents, much more than I ever recall before. The only silver lining is, I think it's actually made New Yorkers and the people in New Jersey more resilient. I think it's made them more community-oriented.

I'm old enough to remember, Neil, in the old days, New Yorkers were sort of isolated, tough people. You didn't really get involved. You didn't really interact that much with strangers.

It's a different attitude out there now.

CAVUTO: Yes, it is. It is.

CUOMO: This morning, on the Hoboken train, everybody was out there helping one another. It's like, we have gone through it so many times, everybody is a first-responder.

We did citizen preparedness training now in this state. That was never done before, how to react how to a terrorist attack, how to react to a hurricane, an earthquake. And I think it's actually increased the sense of community.

CAVUTO: All right.

CUOMO: And that is -- that is a good thing.  And to the extent myself and Governor Christie, who don't see eye to eye on every political issue -- you know, sometimes, he's wrong, Neil.

(LAUGHTER)

CAVUTO: Well, you know, it is...

CUOMO: I think that the partnership...

CAVUTO: It is something unique to see. It is something unique to see, as it should be at times of tragedy.

Governor Cuomo, thank you very much for the update. Be well.

CUOMO: But that's our job.

CAVUTO: Well, we appreciate that.

CUOMO: Thanks.

CAVUTO: Governor Cuomo of the fine state of New York.

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