Interviews

'Factor' news of the day: Warheads, Syria and football

North Korea's nuclear tests, Gary Johnson's 'Aleppo' gaffe and the NFL national anthem controversy; Bill breaks down the hot topics on 'The O'Reilly Factor'

 

This is a RUSH transcript from "The O'Reilly Factor," September 9, 2016. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated.
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O'REILLY: "Back of the Book" segment wanted tonight, The Factor news of the day. We begin with North Korea conducting its fifth underground nuke test last night. That, of course, against international law but North Korea doesn't care. The tests shook the earth at a 5.3 magnitude. And was the most powerful nuclear exposition North Korea has ever undertaken. Condemnation came quickly. President Obama saying, quote, "As commander- in-chief, I have a responsibility to safeguard the American people and ensure the United States is leading the international community in responding to this threat."

Does anyone believe Mr. Obama will respond to the threat in a meaningful way? Anyone? This evening, I do not believe the North Koreans are afraid.

Back home, libertarian presidential candidate Gary Johnson still trying to recover from a TV interview where he did not know what Aleppo was.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

I was thinking acronym when he said Aleppo. And guilty. No excuse whatsoever. If it is kissing my chances goodbye, so be it. But I have always been served really well by telling the truth. And you tell the truth, and you can get your way through things.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

O'REILLY: Well, sadly, Governor, so be it. You didn't have a chance in the first place. And now your profile is damaged beyond repair. At least in this campaign. For the record, I think the Governor is a good man. Misguided in some areas, but I appreciate his public service. But he is certainly not ready to run this country.

And finally another NFL player refusing to stand during the national anthem. Denver Broncos linebacker Brandon Marshall knelt last night and said this after the game.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

BRANDON MARSHALL, NFL LINEBACKER: I'm not against the military. I'm not against, you know, the police, you know, or America, you know, I'm just against social injustice. I didn't want to do it as far as take a need. But I will also donate, you know, to programs for veterans and, you know, different things like that. You know, I will donate undisclosed amount and I'm going to be active in this.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

O'REILLY: Now, Mr. Marshall is an interesting study as far as being an American is concerned. Not a football player. An American. He was raised in Las Vegas. Had a violent father who went to prison. But he worked hard and succeeded in developing his football skills. Marshall received a scholarship, full scholarship from the University of Nevada. He went to college free. By the way, he was on the same team as Colin Kaepernick who started the national anthem disrespect.

Anyway, Brandon Marshall has played well in the National Football League and recently signed a $32 million contract. So let's put this in perspective. Poor kid, bad father, develops his God-given skills, is presented with an opportunity to attend college free of charge. Then becomes a professional football player, earning millions in our capitalistic system. Nowhere on earth could Brandon Marshall have done that but America. Nowhere.

To be fair, bad things do happen in this country, in every country, and they must be confronted. But to disrespect our entire system when you have reaped so much benefit from it is fallacious in the extreme. Brandon Marshall and others like him have an obligation to think about what they're putting out there because some impressionable folks listen to them. Want to improve things? Good. Disrespecting the anthem, not good.

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