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The Five

Is Obama admin. downplaying ISIS threat after Brussels attacks?

This is a rush transcript from "The Five," March 25, 2016. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated.

DANA PERINO, CO-HOST: Hello, everyone. I'm Dana Perino along with Kimberly Guilfoyle, Eboni Williams, Eric Bolling, and Jesse Watters. It's 5 o'clock in New York City and this is "The Five."

Breaking today, U.S. forces have taken out the second in command of ISIS along with other top leaders. Details in a moment. But first, new dramatic raise (ph) in Belgium with explosions and gunfire, as police hunt down more suspects from Tuesday's attacks. At least three arrested earlier, the hunt goes on for the suspects seen with the two airport bombers, along with the man linked to the Metro station bombing. Fox's Mike Tobin has the latest, live from Brussels.

MIKE TOBIN, FOX NEWS CORRESPONDENT: And as far, Dana, as what happened out here, the mayor of this municipality said the federal prosecutors had specific information about the individual who was taken down here, and they needed to act quickly. And that's exactly what happened. I can show you some of the aftermath of the gunfire that happened. You got the broken glass.  They still haven't cleaned it up yet. They've just put a little tape around it. We do know there are different witness accounts as far as how it all went down here but ultimately, this individual was shot in the leg.  There was a little girl with him. And the security forces with their weapons drawn, had to coach this little girl away before they brought in the bomb robot. The bomb robot was brought in. A bag belonging to this man was searched. Something was found in that bag. The information we have is that there were explosions in that bag. Ultimately, he was dragged off.

We've also got information that this was linked to the raid in the northern suburb of Paris last night. In that particular raid, a man named (Inaudible) was taken into custody. He is called the high level operative at the advance stages of planning and attack. A working bomb was taken from his residence. He has got a history in Brussels. He was convicted last July in Belgium of recruiting ISIS fighters, so a lot of history, a lot of interconnection, and a lot of activity out here. There were three raids in the Brussels area last night, six people taken down. Four raids that we know of today, three people taken down, two of them shot in the leg. The French President says this is all part of an interconnected network. But Francois Hollande says he believes this specific network has largely been dismantled. Dana.

PERINO: All right. Thank you, Mike. Today, our defense secretary made a big announcement. Our military took out the number two leader of ISIS, its finance minister. Here is Ash Carter.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

ASH CARTER, U.S. SECRETARY OF DEFENSE: The U.S. military killed several key ISIS terrorists this week including, we believe, Haji Imam. The removal of this ISIL leader will hamper the organization's ability to conduct operations both inside and outside of Iraq and Syria. The momentum of this campaign is now clearly on our side.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

PERINO: Although, ISIS managed to attack Europe again, Secretary of State John Kerry gave another one of his rosy assessments today that the terror network is faltering.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

JOHN KERRY, SECRETARY OF STATE: The very reason that Dash is resorting to actions outside of the Middle East, is that its fantasy of a caliphate is collapsing before their eyes. Its territory is shrinking every day. Its leaders are being decimated. Its revenue sources are dwindling and its fighters are fleeing.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

PERINO: A reporter followed up with him on that in Brussels earlier.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: How can you say that we're winning the fight against ISIS if they've been able to strike Western Europe in the last four months?

KERRY: Because we are winning. The fact that you can strike by sending a couple of -- would be suicidal people into an airport to blow up bombs does not mean they're winning. It means they have struck a horrible blow and have been willing to take lives with them.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

PERINO: Eric, let me start with you on either of these things. I've wanted to get your take on the killing of the finance guy from ISIS because he was able to build up some sort of cash flow and have operations where they're even trying to govern and collect taxes.

ERIC BOLLING, CO-HOST: So again, we've heard the number two's getting taken out in the past, and the number three moves up into the number two spot. But the fact that he had some finance background I guess is a good sign. Still, where's the bag daddy? Let's wait for the big one.  Bring him down. Then I think you have kind of hurt them psychologically.  Number three is thrilled. Now, he becomes number two.

(CROSSTALK)

BOLLING: John Kerry, what was that? We're winning the war on terror now because -- because we are? Because we got number two? And those guys in the airport were just a couple of suicidal.

KIMBERLY GUILFOYLE, CO-HOST: . people.

BOLLING: . people. Really? They killed 34 at least including two Americans right now. And that's how you're going -- we're winning, if that's your assessment of the war, I guess we're winning but it is completely wrong.

PERINO: Kimberly, do you think that this is total speculation but hey, this is The Five. The arrests and then the attacks that happened in Belgium, do you think that had anything to do with our being able to link and find the location of the ISIS number two?

(CROSSTALK)

GUILFOYLE: I would like to think they're doing these kinds of high level investigations and actually linking things together to make forward advances, taking out ISIS. But when you hear somebody like John Kerry say that oh, these are a couple of suicidal people, it is really insulting, especially to the victims and the family members. There are people -- yes, 30 plus you know dead but also hundreds injured, maimed, disfigured, blown to bits, people that are going to have amputations, horrible.

(CROSSTALK)

GUILFOYLE: Burns. You saw that interview from the hospital talking about the people that he saw being covered in blood, some of it not his own. You really can't say we're winning against ISIS. I'm so happy that we took out number two. But I agree. Take out the kingpin. That will really send out some shockwaves to them. But you can't rest there. Because it is whack-a- mole. Another terrorist, you know, an ISIS guy will pop up after that.  You have to really attack the nerve centers, you have to cut off the money supply, and you have to hit them hard, so they're not able to commit acts of terror in Europe or against the United States. If you hit them in Syria, you hit them in Iraq, Mosul, you can knock them out there. That is going to prevent them from coming and doing damage here and in Europe. And that's a little bit of what President Bush have talked about after 9/11.

PERINO: John Kerry was talking about suicidal people that come to the airport and having an attack. But we know from earlier this week from reports that 400 fighters, apparently ISIS said 400 fighters are on their way to Europe now to wage basically guerrilla warfare.

JESSE WATTERS, GUEST CO-HOST:  This is an administration downplaying terrorism. It is what they do. I think the number two with the CIA, Morell just came out, a former Obama guy and says America is losing. So I don't think you can discount that. You've had San Bernardino, the deadliest attack on U.S. soil since 9/11. Christian genocide, people being burned, people being beheaded, attacks in Europe, blood everywhere.

PERINO: Crucified.

WATTERS: And then Obama saying what we need to do is say we need to say we're winning and they're losing, and that is going to defeat them. Once he unleashes Special Operations, that's great. This is a great tactical hit out there. But the counter-punch. They set off a bomb and we hit them. They set off a bomb and we hit them. Why are not we hitting them every single day? That should be the strategy.

EBONI WILLIAMS, GUEST CO-HOST: I think you're pointing out a very important kind of semantics problem with this White House, Jesse. And everybody has spoken on it. Look, instead of being you know kind of like excited or happy that we've taken out number two, the problem is John Kerry goes too far in the way he's framing it, to say we're winning by what measure? To Eric's point. You know, I don't think most Americans are comforted by words like we're winning when hundreds of people have been injured.

GUILFOYLE: Yeah.

WILLIAMS: With 30 some plus dead just this week. Also, you know, words like containment. That doesn't comfort most American people and the semantics around this I think are very troublesome tomorrow.

BOLLING: President Obama rarely said more Americans die in bathtub injuries than have been killed by terror. And that tone is so toned down, I can't tell you.

(CROSSTALK)

BOLLING: How many Americans are worried about falling in a bathtub and dying tomorrow? Probably not many. I wonder every time I go to Times Square or go George Washington Bridge.

(CROSSTALK)

BOLLING: I wonder is this thing going to blow up. What's going to happen?  I mean, that's the problem. You're right, the way they're framing it.

(CROSSTALK)

BOLLING: They're framing it from the top down.

(CROSSTALK)

BOLLING: This is President Obama, you know, Islam is a religion of peace.  Unfortunately, there is a radical vein of Islam.

WILLIAMS: It can't be ignored. It can't be ignored.

(CROSSTALK)

WILLIAMS: And Kimberly is exactly right. We have to go to the nucleus.  And I don't know why, I don't get it. Why is the White House afraid to use that type of more aggressive -- it is OK to be aggressive.

BOLLING: He's a Nobel Peace Prize winner. He's not going there. He doesn't believe we should be fighting the war on terror, let alone winning it.

(CROSSTALK)

GUILFOYLE: . radical about climate change. Because that's what he believes in. I mean, he is consistent in terms of the things that are important to him, that he wants to stress with his administration. You're right, Eric, this starts from the top and trickles down. I don't want to hear about containment of ISIS. I used those words when I used to sell Tupperware. This is ridiculous to me.

(CROSSTALK)

BOLLING: You sold Tupperware?

GUILFOYLE: Yeah.

(CROSSTALK)

GUILFOYLE: I loved the job.

(CROSSTALK)

PERINO: The other thing that we learned this week was that apparently, this is according to the reports in the European press, when they got Abdeslam, the guy from Friday that was arrested, that they started to interrogate him on Saturday, but they didn't start with what do you know that's about to happen now. Apparently, they started in a chronological way, which is what led you to this point where you decided to be radicalized. So they might have missed this opportunity to prevent the attacks.

GUILFOYLE: Yeah, that's the problem. Missed opportunities. I would be so angry if I was a family member who was killed, injured, or maimed in Brussels when they have the opportunity. They knew where these guys were.  Why didn't they do something about it at that time? Save lives. Does that not inspire you to action and to courage and to bravery, especially when you have the resources? That's why it is shameful. I'm upset at the lack of security and the lack of follow-through. My God, wasn't the terrorists warning enough?

PERINO: All right. The present government admits it could have done more to prevent Tuesday's attack, but America can learn from Europe's counterterrorism failures. That's next.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

GUILFOYLE: Welcome back. We want to talk now about some of the lessons that can be learned from Tuesday's attack in Brussels. Belgium's government has acknowledged it missed many warning signs leading up to the strikes. The country's Justice and Interior ministers have even offered to resign, but the Prime Minister has asked them to stay on. Europe has a major terror crisis on its hands. And Bill O'Reilly's point some of the reasons why.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

BILL O'REILLY, HOST, "THE O'REILLY FACTOR": In Belgium, where the bombers struck this week, intelligence agents cannot tap telephones, nor can they look into computers. It is against Belgian law. And police are restrained from raiding private homes from 9:00 people to 5:00 a.m. No matter what you do, they can't come in and get you. And Belgium wonders why it is a terror target? The incredible laxity on immigration and the ultraliberal policing have made Europe the easiest target in the world for ISIS and every other terror groups. And believe me, if the far left had its way here, we would be just like Belgium.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GUILFOYLE: So that's obviously a warning sign to Europe. Because this is more of the same can be expected, unless some serious intelligence and security measures are put forward. So, Jesse, I see you nodding.

WATTERS: I have four lessons from this. Bring back harsh interrogation.  You just mentioned it. They had the guy, two days before. They didn't turn the screws to him. And now, they have no actionable intelligence.  The left doesn't like to be mean to terrorists. Number two, surveillance and wiretapping work. I don't care who is calling Bolling. I care if they're calling Baghdad. I don't care about privacy, if I'm dead. So the left is like big brother, except if it is about the cell phone. Number three, immigration policy is also a national security policy. Countries can choose who they want to let into the country. You don't choose, you lose. The left likes borders as well. And they want Muslim refugees here.  And then lastly, I think you want to fight the enemy there, so you don't to have to face them here. Pin them down in their neighborhood, so they can't plot and launch attacks.

GUILFOYLE: All right. Sounds like some good ideas. Bolling, some thoughts? Because Jesse has some privacy issues.

(CROSSTALK)

BOLLING: Well, Brussels we know had major failures. Number one, the Turkish government said we're sending at least one of these guys back to you. And by the way, there's a problem. They've been radicalized.  Belgium decided not to follow them. Number two, one or two of them are on the U.S. terror watch list, at some point. They ignored that as well. So those two gentlemen that are inc-charge of their anti-terror group taskforce, or whatever that is -- the interior ministers, whoever they are, should step aside. It is like Belgium became the gun-free zone.

(CROSSTALK)

BOLLING: It becomes the softest possible target on the planet. It is like the ant-terror logic zone. And terrorists are like go ahead, this is easy place to hit, like gun-free movie theater.

GUILFOYLE: Passively resistant.

(CROSSTALK)

BOLLING: Beef it up. Beef up the terror resistance. I agree with you, Jesse. The way they do that is they fight terror. Let them fight terror there first. Close the borders, stop playing around where you can be a Syrian refugee, get pulled into Germany and then travel freely throughout Europe. Really? Because ISIS already said they are going after radicalizing Syrian refugees. So they've opened themselves to a can of worms. I agree, fight them there.

GUILFOYLE: You're right. Angela Merkel will have some problems as well in Germany. Dana, you've been quite vocal about security measures and some failures there, including the inter-departments not speaking to one another, federal versus local, and communicating information. We learned those lessons after 9/11.

PERINO: Yeah. In the USA, we changed our laws and our posture. It was controversial to do so, but it was the right thing to do. Belgium and every other civilized nation has a duty to protect. It is not just your citizens who could be attacked. It is anybody at an international airport, for example. The other problem is it is not just the referees that are coming from the most recent conflicts. I believe two of these guys were actually born in Molenbeek. So the problems of the refugees, I think that's one issue. But they have a bigger problem. And interestingly, one thing that I think America does very well. If you come to America, you can become an American. I think that when you talk about the failure to assimilate in these countries, partly there's a reason because it takes both parties to want to do that. And the refugees didn't want to do it when they settled there years ago. And the police don't know what to do next. But I wanted to mention one other thing. This is not just a Belgium problem. But their laws are screwed up all across Europe. I saw a story today that happened in the U.K. where a PR guy in London had an argument with a Muslim woman and he talked about it on Twitter. And there were angry reactions from both sides, it was hateful rhetoric. And the guy, just because he sent the tweet, he got arrested. Now, in the U.K., they could not find a way to arrest 1,200 child molesters, but they can find a way to arrest a guy who wrote a tweet? They don't have a First Amendment in the U.K. But that's the way the laws are going. They strip people away from the ability to express themselves. That I think is even more troubling.

GUILFOYLE: Eboni.

WILLIAMS: Yeah. I have so many concerns. Some can't be helped but some can. We talked about this. But some things can. And when you look at Brussels, and countries like this, like Dana is saying, most of Europe now, it so vulnerable. I don't know why adjustments aren't being made. That's my first issue. I want to ask you about this, Kimberly. Because we know - - they had at least one of these terrorists.

GUILFOYLE: Yeah.

WILLIAMS: And you know let him go. They let him go because they cited lack of evidence. My question to you is this, we respect thresholds around, why do we need a certain amount of evidence to move forward with the prosecution. You've been a prosecutor. I am a crazy for thinking that at some point those thresholds needs to be reexamined in light of the crime?

(CROSSTALK)

WILLIAMS: You know, I'm just wondering -- I mean, why is that not being considered here?

GUILFOYLE: Well, I think it should. Again, this is a very costly lesson that they have to learn. When you have the information-rich target right there, a high value target in your hands, you're able to talk to him, you're able to get the information, shame on you, if you don't take that opportunity to seize the moment. And if you're in charge, you're making the laws, do whatever it takes to keep your country safe. As you say, you have a duty to protect, to secure, to invest in the national security of your country, especially in Europe, with open borders in the E.U. Other people are falling prey to your national security weaknesses. And that's a really difficult part here.

WILLIAMS: Yeah.

(CROSSTALK)

GUILFOYLE: I mean, if they had questioned them and gotten the information, they could have saved lives and they didn't do it.

WILLIAMS: Yeah, I think that's a failure.

GUILFOYLE: They're worried actually about curfews at night, terrorists getting beauty sleep, instead. God forbid, put the eye mask on.

New development from the GOP presidential race next on "The Five."

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

WATTERS: The GOP presidential race now, Donald Trump has taken a brief break from the trail for work purposes, but Ted Cruz has been campaigning in Wisconsin where the next contest takes place on April 5th. As the battle for delegates goes on, Wisconsin Governor and former candidate Scott Walker thinks it wouldn't be a bad thing for Republicans to pick their nominee at the convention and suggests the party could go with someone other than the three candidates still left.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

GOV. SCOTT WALKER, R-WIS.: I think if it is an open convention, it is likely it would be someone who is not currently running. It is like the qualifications for car dealerships. I think any of us who have commented on this election have said -- almost every prediction is off. So it is hard to predict anything.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

WATTERS: There are reports Trump's campaign has taken steps to take develop a strategy to guarantee his victory in the event of a contested convention. Dana, this hasn't happened in a very long time, these contested conventions. You have to imagine these delegates. They're under a lot of pressure. They're going to come hey, I'll fly to Aruba.

(CROSSTALK)

PERINO: That would be highly appropriate.

(LAUGHTER)

(CROSSTALK)

WATTERS: You mean politics?

(CROSSTALK)

WATTERS: There's got to be a lot of pressure on these delegates.

PERINO: A lot of them are not even elected yet because those campaigns are different. And they have yet to be chosen or to be elected. In some states, choose them. It is like every state is different. It is smart if you're going to be a presidential candidate, to not only have your primary strategy and your general election strategy, but at the same time, at a parallel track, to have a convention strategy for the eventuality that this could happen. I don't think anybody is saying it is a good idea that it could happen. I don't think it was fair that you said that about Scott Walker. He's saying it could happen and what we know from history is that sometimes it means that the person who has the most votes doesn't end up as the nominee. That's not always true. All of us are on uncharted territory right now. So we don't know.

WATTERS: How dare you accuse me of being unfair, Dana? Eric, people are worried about Trump because they didn't think he had a ground game, especially going into Iowa. He has never done this before. He is a businessman. Does he have a convention ground game? Are you hearing anything?

BOLLING: I'm hearing that he needs to be in the convention ground game for that exact reason. Because when you get to the convention, you know, the rule, again -- I said something about the rules committee yesterday. I read it in Politico. And I said that there are RNC representatives who are meeting with high profile Republicans in Washington, a couple of other big names, big groups. And they were talking at one point -- Politico reported that they were talking about whether or not the rules could be changed at the convention prior to the ballot. In other words, making delegates that were bound to unbound delegates, which means they could actually take delegates from a candidate given to another. And that would have to be done at the rules committee. And the RNC didn't make it very clear that that wasn't going to be the case. The point is this, the RNC, after the show, emailed me personally. Hey, I'm not sure what that is all about. So I went back and read the article again. It says specifically that this was allegedly going on and representatives from the RNC were meeting with these people, and that topic did come up. My point is this. If they go to the convention and changed the rules at the convention to make, I don't know, 1237 is not the number anymore. Now, it is 1257 or 1300. There will be such an uproar on the right by people who are just -- you know, how they've been saying all along, 1237 is the rule. That's the rule. If they change the rule again and move the goalpost, why even have primaries? Just do it at the convention.

PERINO: Can I say something?

WATTERS: Sure.

PERINO: At the same time, when that political article ran, a Washington Times article ran in which it said that the meeting was to try to force more transparency to head off anti-Trump maneuvers.

WATTERS: It is happening on both sides, obviously.

(CROSSTALK)

GUILFOYLE: That's within the same meeting.

BOLLING: They were not very transparent though.

(CROSSTALK)

BOLLING: Are you going to change the rules at the convention, yes or no?

(CROSSTALK)

WATTERS: You said about moving the goalposts is accurate. This is a party that has lost twice in a row for the White House. And now, the party is saying, trust us. We're going to pull a rabbit out of a hat.

(CROSSTALK)

GUILFOYLE: That's not what anybody is saying. Why are you doing this?

WATTERS: Scott Walker just said --

(CROSSTALK)

WATTERS: We may pick somebody who is not even running right now. Didn't he just say that?

GUILFOYLE: OK. Obviously, what this is showing that there are going to be feelings and high emotions on all sides of this issue. At that meeting, they obviously discussed a number of things, and probably people who are pro-Cruz, pro-Trump supporters that want to make sure. I hear your point of saying if you have the rules, why are they there for, if you're going to change them at the last second? And rules should be there as guidelines.  So that there's fair play for everybody and it is an even you know course.  So I get that. I think ultimately though we have to think not just about the delegates, but the people out there voting, casting votes, and waiting in very long lines, three hours, four hours, to be able to express their choice for a candidate. We have to respect the Democratic process. And there is some ethics involved here, so people understand the rules and how they are supposed to be played. With that being the case, Kasich and all three, you know, Cruz and Trump, stay in the race. Guess what, I don't think anybody can get to 1237.

WATTERS: That's it.

WILLIAMS: I see it like this. Even if it is at our tables and within our colleagues, it is high intensity, it is high stakes. And there are a lot of feelings around. Kimberly is right. People are waiting in long lines, to be part of this Democratic process. But the original point is this, Dana was right about the fact that you have to have to multi-faceted. You have three campaigns going on because you have a primary, a micro kind of convention-style campaign, and then hopefully a general election strategy.

WATTERS: Yes.

WILLIAMS: So all of these candidates have to be on their A-game on three different levels.

WATTERS: That's our right. Make sure to stay tune for the Fastest Seven next because today, it features a surprise guest appearance. Don't go away.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

BOLLING: Welcome back. Time for the Fastest Seven Minutes on television, make eight, maybe even nine today. Three stories, seven brisk minutes, one balance tone. A special guest is going to join us in a minute, but first, we begin with Jimmy Kimmel taking a jab at some of Clinton's critics last night by man-explaining how the candidates should deliver a speech.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

JIMMY KIMMEL, HOST, "JIMMY KIMMEL LIVE": Max-explaining is a way that we, men, can help women be better.

(APPLAUSE)

HILLARY CLINTON, D-PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE: So you just want me to talk?

KIMMEL: Yeah, you just talk and I will correct you whenever I feel the need.

CLINTON: No matter who you are, what you look like, or who you love.

(CROSSTALK)

KIMMEL: You know, you have to speak up because we can't hear you. You're like a mouse up there.

CLINTON: America is the greatest country.

KIMMEL: OK. Don't smile like that because it is too forced. It looks like you're faking it.

CLINTON: We don't need to be made great, we need to be.

KIMMEL: Oh, my God, with the sour pus.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

BOLLING: K.G., your thoughts.

(CROSSTALK)

GUILFOYLE: I like Jimmy Kimmel a lot. I think he's super funny. And I like Jay Leno as you know. So I thought that was good. That was actually nice, the way she handled it at the end, so maybe she was a little you know more like that, she would be better off.

(CROSSTALK)

PERINO: Her campaign has said that it was sexist.

GUILFOYLE: Right.

PERINO: . when the commentators were saying that her speech was too angry.  And so a good way to deal with that is through humor. So I thought that was cute.

BOLLING: Very good. Let's move on to this one. The highly anticipated Batman versus Superman movie hit theaters today, but there might be a problem. Some critics aren't loving it.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: If there is a 1 percent chance.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The greatest gladiator in the history of the world.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: God versus man.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

BOLLING: All right, Jesse, I'm clearly Batman. Are you Batman or Superman?

WATTERS: I'm a Batman guy. I like his toys, his car and the women. I probably won't see it though. I haven't seen a movie in about four years in a theater. I'll wait for it.

(CROSSTALK)

BOLLING: Superman has a woman, too.

WATTERS: Lois Lane.

(CROSSTALK)

WILLIAMS: All right. Listen, I'm a Superman kind of woman. Actually, I like Clark Kent more. I like the glasses. I'm not seeing this. I'm a very big movie person, Jesse. But all my -- not just the critics there, all my friends that have seen it early in L.A....

(CROSSTALK)

BOLLING: Finally, as you know, our friend, Geraldo Rivera made his big debut on "Dancing With The Stars" on Monday.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

(END VIDEO CLIP)

BOLLING: All right. The judges were a little rough on him, but he hopes to wow the judges this coming Monday. He's been rehearsing like crazy, but took a short break to join us live for a few moments from Los Angeles.  Geraldo, I hope you brought Edyta with you.

GERALDO RIVERA, FOX NEWS SENIOR CORRESPONDENT: I didn't. I should have though, Eric. And I appreciate your support. And K.G., she's been wonderful and Megyn Kelly, and the Fox viewers. If I survive this week, it is all because of you.

(CROSSTALK)

BOLLING: Jump in there. You have a question for Geraldo?

GUILFOYLE: So, Geraldo, they talked about the vigorous workouts. It must be charming to be with Edyta, right? It is a little motivational.

RIVERA: Edyta is a fabulous dancer. She's so charismatic, she's so mostly patient. Because I'm such at a loss when it comes to dancing, you know.  I'm reminded of the line from Black Vaudeville (ph) days, feet don't fail me now. My feet just didn't show up. Hopefully, Salsa Night on Monday, I'll be there.

GUILFOYLE: All right.

PERINO: I remember, Geraldo, that because you've done all you've done and you're always in front of the camera and you're in front with a lot of people and you're speaking, that you have a way to deal with any sort of nerves. But I would imagine that dancing in front of millions of people like that had to be really nerve-racking.

RIVERA: Oh, my God, it was so daunting. No doubt about it. It is so far out of my comfort zone. It is something that you know I've never tried before and here I'm trying it. At 72 years old, with one foot, so it has to be years before. They asked me several times. I always said no. My kids were afraid I would have an affair with the dancer or something.

(LAUGHTER)

RIVERA: It hasn't happened. But you know for one reason or another, I said no. Then finally I said, if I don't get this checked in my bucket list now, I never will. So I'm glad I did it. I hope I can survive this week. And it is fabulous.

WILLIAMS: Geraldo, it is Eboni here. I'm just going to give you like a little piece of advice my mother gave me. I understand you're not Fred Astaire, but you have a killer smile, right? I am also rhythmically challenged. So when I was a cheerleader in high school -- I'm no shocker, Jesse, don't do that.

(LAUGHTER)

WILLIAMS: She told me -- she told sell it, sell it. Keep smiling. Keep laughing, and people will vote for you, and they will fall in love with your smile. And you just keep selling it, baby. You've got it.

RIVERA: All right, Eboni. I appreciate it that. You know, one thing, it is a Salsa dance. (Inaudible) number, it was the music we used for my wedding -- my wedding march when I came into the synagogue when we got married in 2003, which was the last time I danced. I was tequila drunk.  So hopefully it is all going to work out.

(CROSSTALK)

GUILFOYLE: Tequila and you know, you have to make the Puerto Ricans proud, Geraldo. Don't let us down.

(LAUGHTER)

RIVERA: I'm channeling it now.

WATTERS: Just last longer than Tucker Carlson. That's all I care about.

(LAUGHTER)

WATTERS: . at Fox News.

(CROSSTALK)

WILLIAMS: . Poor Geraldo.

RIVERA: That's my one goal, to outlast Tucker Carlson for one week.

(LAUGHTER)

RIVERA: I'll be a success in life.

BOLLING: You were a great sport for doing it, I got to tell you. But the highlight for me, I had no idea that the show comes up on you and you open a vault. And finally, we found something in the vault.

GUILFOYLE: Brilliant.

RIVERA: We have, that's a great gag. Al Capone's vault was the highest rated syndicated show on television. But next Monday, I'm telling you, Eric, you're going to love it.

BOLLING: All right. We are going to leave it right there. Thank you, Geraldo. Good luck on Monday. We will be watching you. We celebrate Easter a little bit early next on "The Five."

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

WATTERS: You know what holiday it is this Sunday?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Memorial Day?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I'm terrible at this.

WATTERS: Why do celebrate Easter?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Because that's when Jesus Christ was born.

WATTERS: What happened on Easter?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I'm honestly not really sure.

WATTERS: What does the Easter Bunny have to do with Jesus?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Jesus laid them.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

WILLIAMS: OK. So, Jesse, you've got some interesting responses from people who clearly failed his Easter quiz. Today is Good Friday and Easter is on Sunday. And 80 percent of Americans plan to celebrate the holiday according to a recent survey, 51 percent say they'll go to church. I'll be in that number. More than $2 billion will be spent on candy like Peeps that we got right here. How does The Five celebrate Easter? All right.  We'll go around. Everybody is going to say their favorite Easter candy.

WATTERS: Cadbury eggs is.

(CROSSTALK)

WILLIAMS: OK. Dana.

DANA PERINO, THE FIVE SHOW CO-HOST: I would say Reese's Peanut Butter Cups Eggs. I used to love Peeps but I'll always love forever Black Jellybeans.

(CROSSTALK)

WILLIAMS: Can anybody guess how many Peeps will be eaten like for Easter weekend?

WATTERS: Nationally?

WILLIAMS: Nationally.

WATTERS: One hundred thousand.

WILLIAMS: One and a half billion Peeps.

(CROSSTALK)

GUILFOYLE: But this is mine. I think the producers give this cute little Easter Bunny for me as a present. I'm not quite sure how to get this -- oh, yeah.

(CROSSTALK)

GUILFOYLE: Bunny talks.

(CROSSTALK)

BOLLING: Also, the Peanut Butter Eggs. They should be there all year. I can't eat those. I don't know. I feel sick today.

GUILFOYLE: That's really good.

BOLLING: I'm actually going to church.

WILLIAMS: I am, too. I'm going to church and going to brunch. Because I love an excuse for brunch. My favorite candy, I'm a jellybean gal. I love all jelly beans. But it is not the most festive color.

(CROSSTALK)

GUILFOYLE: Do you eat all the jelly bellies?

(CROSSTALK)

WILLIAMS: The plain just regular old.

(CROSSTALK)

WATTERS: Did you say Cadbury Eggs are English?

WILLIAMS: Yes. They're expensive, Jesse.

(CROSSTALK)

WATTERS: I can afford it.

GUILFOYLE: Maybe a Fox fan would like there Easter Bunny if you put it on the Fox Five Facebook Page, let's see if you want this little Bunny.

WILLIAMS: Would we raffle it off now that K.G. has taken a bite out of it.  It is actually more valuable now.

(LAUGHTER)

GUILFOYLE: It might make a clone or something, right? The DNA on it.

(CROSSTALK)

WILLIAMS: Jesse, let me ask you. I know you have twin girls.

WATTERS: Yes.

WILLIAMS: They're four.

WATTERS: They're four and a half.

WILLIAMS: Four and a half, OK. You did the color thing -- the whole Easter color experience?

WATTERS: Yes. I got eggs. Mine were brown because I don't know how to dye eggs. I just put it in every color. But they had a nice time and we'll hunt for it. And then I'll steal all their candy.

(CROSSTALK)

WILLIAMS: So do you the egg hunt at your house.

WATTERS: We're going to have multiple egg hunts this weekend.

(CROSSTALK)

BOLLING: Can I just apologize.

(LAUGHTER)

WATTERS: This is hard hitting. Kimberly bites it.

(CROSSTALK)

GUILFOYLE: Here is an algebra lesson for all you kids at home. What do you to one side of the equation, you must do to the other. So here we go.

(CROSSTALK)

PERINO: Do they get an Easter basket still?

GUILFOYLE: What do you think is?

(LAUGHTER)

GUILFOYLE: Well, you know, very environmental. Recycle. I will bring some of these home, but this is empty. There is not even jellybeans in those eggs.

WATTERS: I think you should break off a piece of the chocolate.

(CROSSTALK)

BOLLING: Cadbury.

WILLIAMS: Follow Jesse Watters.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

PERINO: It's time for one more thing. I'm going to go first with this.

(HERE IS THE CORNY JOKE OF THE DAY)

All right. Are you ready for this? It is Easter themed, Easter themed.  All right. First one, did you hear the one, the corny joke about the 50- pound jelly bean?

WATTERS: No.

PERINO: It's pretty hard to swallow.

(LAUGHTER)

PERINO: Thank you, Eboni.

BOLLING: You made that sound effect.

PERINO: Why did the Easter egg hide? He was a little chicken.

(LAUGHTER)

WILLIAMS: Oh, boy.

PERINO: That's funny. That is funny. We have to pretend to laugh.

(LAUGHTER)

PERINO: Why is a bunny the luckiest animal in the world?

WATTERS: Why?

PERINO: It has four rabbit feet.

GUILFOYLE: Doesn't it have hands?

PERINO: I need Juan here. Juan would play along and laugh.

WILLIAMS: I want to get one right.

PERINO: I have one last one.

WILLIAMS: OK.

GUILFOYLE: I hope it is a real knee slapper.

PERINO: Why was the Easter bunny so upset? He was having a bad hare day.

(LAUGHTER)

PERINO: OK. Thank you. Thanks for playing, everybody.

(CROSSTALK)

WILLIAMS: I really feel -- I think you should bring back the Jalapeno.

PERINO: Jalapeno one. That was my favorite. As if I didn't eat enough in the last six minutes, guess what today is?

GUILFOYLE: Kimberly's food court. All right. We have plenty of time apparently. I might be able to eat all of this gigantic waffle. It is International Waffle Day, not to be confused with National Waffle Day, which I will also celebrate at a later time in August. So did you know this? Fun facts. International Waffle Day began in Sweden in a place that I think is called Vaffledagen. Like waffle, but with a V, Vaffle, where people celebrated the beginning of spring by gorging on waffles. I never saw anyone in Sweden that looked like they were gorging on waffle, if you know what I'm saying. We're spoiled in the U.S. because we get to celebrate it twice a year. But that is kind of the American way. I prefer my waffles like this with a little melted butter already on them. Thank you for that. And then I really love some maple syrup. It is quite tasty at Kimberly's food court. So take a little bite before Bolling's turn here.

(CROSSTALK)

BOLLING: What about like chocolate or strawberries or that powdered sugar instead?

GUILFOYLE: A really good question.

(LAUGHTER)

GUILFOYLE: Sweet or sour, right? So I like to have this with like the syrup, but I also really, really love to have it with sausage as you know.

WILLIAMS: I agree.

GUILFOYLE: However, could not do that today. God bless. It's Good Friday. So if I was not doing that, I would do strawberries or I would do blueberries. But on top or on the side, never made into the batter. Does that make sense?

BOLLING: How about two waffles with ice cream in the middle?

(CROSSTALK)

GUILFOYLE: I would maybe do that.

PERINO: I like a waffle cone.

GUILFOYLE: I also like to have the eggs with the waffle.

(CROSSTALK)

GUILFOYLE: You're next, Eric.

BOLLING: Nothing better than skiing and getting off the slopes or even doing skiing.

(CROSSTALK)

PERINO: And I like hot chocolate.

BOLLING: So this part of my first thing of my one more thing is apologizing for Shannon Bream who is hosting Special Report, not Bret Baier. All right, anyway, tonight, stay here all night. Tonight, I'm hosting an O'Reilly special on terror. We'll have the full hour on terror.

(CROSSTALK)

BOLLING: We have Ronald Kessler who has some inside ideas and information.  He spoke to the FBI and they are concerned with the Muslim community. He is going to explain why. We have two guys at the forefront of the San Bernardino terror attack in America saying, talking about how much risk we have here in America. And we have Dr. Ben Carson and Colonel Ralph Peters.

(CROSSTALK)

BOLLING: And my one more thing is the historic, first ever gig in Cuba.  Check it out, guys. Rolling Stones will play in the Main Square there for a free concert. This is the first time this has happened, a big name rock and roll band since 1959. No one knows how it is going to go, but I have a hunch it will go great.

WILLIAMS: Yeah.

PERINO: Rock and roll diplomacy, that's a good idea for the State Department.

Jesse, you're next.

WATTERS: So it is the 10th anniversary of the Duke Lacrosse case. I saw the 30 for 30 on ESPN last night. It is titled Fantastic Lives. It is terrific.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: All the people at the party were Duke Lacrosse players.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The state of misogyny that is present among some members of this team.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I got a phone call. I said to him, when you need me, I'll be down there.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

WATTERS: So it is an incredible special. Everybody needs to watch it.  This guy, the prosecutor, rail rolled these kids. The school did not stand by them. The national media convicted these guys and because they had well-off parents, they were able to pony up for some nice defense lawyers.  They beat the charges. And Nifong went to prison for one day and was held in contempt of court and is a terrible guy. So, everybody, don't believe the hype.

PERINO: Did the documentary say where the boys are now?

WATTERS: No. They did not answer any questions but they're all doing well, I heard.

(CROSSTALK)

PERINO: Eboni, you're next.

WILLIAMS: I just want to say I actually practice law in Durham County right around that time. It was an incredible time. He was also disbarred, too. My one more thing is I had a great night last night with some of my neighbors. There is this group with me, right. All of you guys live in Harlem. In East Harlem, there is this great organization, check them out, (inaudible), they're having a fundraiser, free dance classes.

(CROSSTALK)

PERINO: And they help you dance?

WILLIAMS: I couldn't teach those girls anything.

PERINO: That's it for us. Have a Happy Easter, everyone.

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