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The Five

Bush opens up on Obama's handling of Iraq, ISIS

This is a rush transcript from "The Five," October 2, 2014. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated.

ERIC BOLLING, CO-HOST: Hello, everyone. Eric Bolling along with Kimberly Guilfoyle, Bob Beckel, Dana Perino and Greg Gutfeld, its 5 o'clock in New York City and this is "The Five."

All right in a moment, you're gonna hear some fascinating sound from a Muslim who says he attended the same mosque where the Oklahoma beheading suspect practiced Islam. What he says goes on in private in that mosque will shock you. Plus, this:

(BEGIUN VIDEO CLIP)

"NOOR": The teaching that Islam allows three choices to be made in non-Muslims and eventually they're all going to have to make that choice to convert to live under Islamic rule or die.

(END OF VIDEO CLIP)

BOLLING: As President Bush predicted, we'd be forced to confront an enemy far greater than Al Qaeda if we left Iraq too soon. He was right today. He spoke to Fox News for the very first time about that ominous warning and the state of Iraq today.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

KILMEADE: You knew it in 2007. In fact this is George Bush, President George Bush in 2007 before the surge.

GEORGE W. BUSH, FORMER PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA: Begin withdrawing before our commanders tell us we're ready would be dangerous.
It means that we'd be risking mass killings on a horrific scale. It means increasing the probability that American troops would have to return at some later date to confront an enemy that is even more dangerous.

KILMEADE: How did you know?

BUSH: Well, I know the nature of the enemy. Anybody who kills 3,000 innocents and beheads people because of their religion or because of their point of view is dangerous. Democracy takes time to take hold, and yet there's impatience with that process in the Americans. Americans have got to understand, that the lesson of 9/11 is still important today as it was right after 9/11.

(END OF VIDEO CLIP)

BOLLING: Also what is he think about President Obama's decision to pull our troops out and let terrorists take over the country? Here's more from 43.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

KILMEADE: Martin Dempsey came out as chairman of joint his status says well known the military recommended and we leave a residual force of 10,000 to 15,000, maybe more. Did you feel the same way?

BUSH: I did, yeah. I agreed with General Dempsey's assessment.

(END OF VIDEO CLIP)

BOLLING: Alright, Bob. We'll open it to you because we have a lot of sound from President Bush. Your thoughts on the -- really the first comments since he really predicted what was going on now back in 2007.

BOB BECKEL, CO-HOST: You have to understand where I'm coming from. I don't think any of this would have happened if we hadn't gone to war in Iraq. Saddam Hussein had done a lot of things that were bad but not nearly as bad as these guys. He was being contained, there was a no fly zone, the Kurds were being protected. More importantly, he kept the Iranians in check. When the administration went on, that I assume they believe were accurate stories about weapons of mass destruction, Colin Powell called his performance at the U.N. The most embarrassing thing he'd ever done in his public life when he was forced to give testimony to the U.N. about why there were weapons of mass destruction. The question really is could 10,000 or 15,000 people have been there and for how long, 10, 20, 30, 40 years and would that really have stopped this? You're talking about secretary on violence it was back over 2,000 years. I think it was a bad decision to go in. The end product of it is we're seeing it today.

BOLLING: Maybe the bad decision was to pull out too soon and as we pointed out, George Bush predicted that if we had let pulled out, if we let the residual force in Iraq, maybe we wouldn't have Americans beheaded on tape.

DANA PERINO, CO-HOST: So if you read Thomas Joscelyn of the Weekly Standard, who writes about the enemy and the nature of the enemy as President Bush was describing. But the grand plan was, to build out from Afghanistan Al Qaeda. And now you have all these other groups that have metastasized that are being called different names, but the truth is it is all Al Qaeda. There's a -- there's of two things basically, what President Bush is saying, when he agrees with General Dempsey, it's no different than what Secretary Gates, Secretary Clinton, Secretary Panetta and General Petraeus have all said, the first three of those all in books so they're on record saying that they disagree with the president's decision to leave Iraq at the time -- or not to leave more of a force there. Bob, that is true. I don't know why you're breathing heavy, but that's true.

(CROSSTALK)

BECKEL: I'm not breathing, I'm listening to you.

PERINO: that cabinet secretary.

BOLLING: You know, he breathes heavy all the time.

PERINO: I know, you can see from my point of view he's always like breathing deep. Those are facts. The only people who seem to think that was not a good idea were Obama, Biden and Susan Rice. Now, that's their prerogative and -- but there are consequences for decisions, as you're seeing. The second thing I wanted to mention is we cut the sound bite a little bit too early because I liked the second part of what President Bush said, "In regards to lesson after 9/11 is that Americans need to understand, the west needs to understand, that the human condition around the world matters. And it matters to our national security." That is the broader foreign policy thinking of the Bush administration. I think it's also important, he -- the president didn't give an interview to Brian Kilmeade today to talk about this per se, of course he knew he would be asked about it, I guess. But, the purpose of inviting them down there was to talk about the fourth annual 2015 warrior open that is a big golf tournament that supports Iraqi and Afghanistan war veterans.

BOLLING: Let me bring these guys in. We have a lot more sound to get to. Thoughts on that first interview after --

GREG GUTFELD, CO-HOST: To Bob's point, we have placed troops in countries for decades after wars so it's something that we do to maintain the peace and sometimes it lasts a long time. That war had been won, but it wasn't Obama's war to win, so it was ours to lose. It was like President Obama had moved into a new apartment and somebody had left the shower curtain behind, but that wasn't his shower curtain so he just got rid of it. That's what he did with the Iraq war.

BOLLING: K.G, your thoughts, let me get on K.G. on this one because we got another piece of sound from Bush, go ahead.

KIMBERLY GUILFOYLE, CO-HOST: I just take issue with taking that shot at President Bush and trying to despair a chance (ph) where he's been nothing but a gentleman and a class act, been unbelievably respectful and empathetic to the difficult job that President Obama had.

BOLLING: Stay right there.

(CROSSTALK)

BOLLING: Bob, hold on, that's a great transition to the next one. What does President Bush think of President Obama allowing ISIS to rise in Iraq?
Listen.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

BUSH: The president has to make the choices he thinks are important. I'm not going to second guess our president. I understand how tough the job is.
And to have a former president, you know, bloviating and second-guessing is, I don't think, good for the presidency or the country.

KILMEADE: Does President Obama call you?

BUSH: Well, he called me to tell me that the nation killed Osama bin Laden, are the (inaudible) and the law enforcer are grateful. But now he's been -- you know he's not on a regular basis, which is OK. It doesn't hurt my feelings. It's a decision he has made.

(END OF VIDEO CLIP)

BOLLING: I want to get to Dana in a second, but go ahead.

GUILFOYLE: Well, he goes on to say that he understands President Obama has developed a relationship over six years with people that he trust and that seeks counsel in, so this is the bigger man, I'm saying you know, what I don't mind, if he needs me, I'm here. But the point is there's always lessons to be learned from history and past presidents have had a history of in fact contacting their predecessors. Because, there was something to be cleaned and learned from that, being the one person on opposition to power. And with respect to President Bush, you didn't see him take a shot and say, "told you so. I was right about this. We should have done -- we should have finished the job by allowing the Iraqi people to have the benefit of ongoing support so that we could have not made what the veterans fought for in vain by seeing intensified by them.

BECKEL: Just out of curiosity, what former presidents consulted other presidents for big decisions?

BOLLING: He did.

BECKEL: For what?

BOLLING: Bill Clinton said that Bush called him.

GUILFOYLE: Called him.

BECKEL: Yeah?

BOLLING: There's one.

GUILFOYLE: Twice a year and.

BECKEL: Talking about bringing them is generally presidents don't.

GUILFOYLE: For different with Nixon. Yeah, I mean there's a history of it.

(CROSSTALK)

PERINO: The reason behind with that Bob is because in the Wall Street Journal there was a very important column by Bret Stephens on Tuesday, in which it suggested that President Obama could benefit from a call from -- with President Bush or having a more of a relationship while talking to him. But, that is based on reports from mostly from Bill Clinton but President Bush is comment on -- commented on it as well that, Bush and Clinton developed a good working relationship and a friendship and camaraderie during the Bush administration.

GUILFOYLE: That continues to this day.

PERINO: Yeah.

GUTFELD: The bottom line is President Obama took the surge personally, because he was against us and punished us nationally because of a petulant, adolescent reaction to something that proved him incorrect.

BECKEL: Can you explain to me what you said this over and over again. This war was won. How do you mean it was?

GUTFELD: The surge. The surge -- was the surge a failure?

PERINO: The surge worked.

GUTFELD: There was a vote. There was democracy, there was calm. There was a surge and then it all went to hell.

BECKEL: What about corruption.

GUTFELD: Corruption is around in every start of every country, we know that.

(CROSSTALK)

BECKEL: But if corruption in our country now.

GUILFOYLE: But because the men and women that served the country valiantly felt that they had achieved the goal and everybody who was there that was on the ground knew that we need to keep the position strong so that they could continue to succeed, otherwise it's like pulling the sheet out from under them.

BOLLING: Let's bring this to the today and now, to terror right here at home. There was a Jihad-style beheading here in America a few days ago and the administration can still only call it workplace violence. But listen closely to a man, Megyn Kelly spoke to last night. He says he attended the same mosque where the Oklahoma suspect worshipped, we could roll it there and the terror was taught there.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

"NOOR": To the public, the mosque will not promote terrorism or any kind of radical acts, but when they're among friends and congregants only, they will promote the true teachings of Islam, which include the offer to non Muslims, the choice, rather, that you must convert, live under Islamic rule, or be fought against, Jihad Fisabilillah, Jihad for the sake of Allah.

(END OF VIDEO CLIP)

BOLLING: And the Oklahoma mass was similar (ph) was also exposes the congregation's true feelings about bin Laden and those horrific beheadings.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

NOOR: I had two friends at the mosque. One of them is now an Imam. The men told me that if Osama bin Laden came to their door, they would invite him in and protect him because he was a brother Muslim and we must protect him for those who don't believe.

MEGYN KELLY, THE KELLY FILE HOST: Did they ever discuss the subject of beheadings? Was that ever discussed?

NOOR: The only time that beheadings were discussed was in the means at which you confront the infidel, as this is related into Quran. That when you meet the unbelievers, you should smile at their necks.

(END OF VIDEO CLIP)

BOLLING: Alright Greg, so now, if you need more proof of terrorize.

GUTFELD: Yeah, But we didn't even need to hear it from him. If this victim was already dead, which I think she was, why did he behead her? Because what would be the point? The point is was to spread terror, to send a message, and that makes it terror. So why don't we just compromise and call it workplace terror. Just get rid of the violence. Well, let's all agree one spot and say it happened at the workplace, its terror. By the way, we're so focused on his actions, but in hate crimes, we're always focused on intent. Why is it with this action -- with this crime it's all about the action and not the intent? The opposite will hate crimes.

BECKEL: You know son, the thing about this is, and I've been saying this for a long time, I got beat up by saying you should no more mosques. A lot of this stuff is going on a lot of mosques. They raise money for terrorists, they -- some, not all of them, but a lot of them preach a brand of Islam that is not acceptable. I think in mainstream is long. But, you know, this is not new to me, this is you know, we were pulled back and
(inaudible) I don't think we should have and that they're training a lot of people.

GUTFELD: But I don't think you can say all mosques.

BECKEL: No, I didn't do that. I said some of them.

GUILFOYLE: No. I mean, look, this is again you know, further evidence and further proof and to pick up on more of what you're talking about, yeah, why wouldn't we take him at his words that describe so in -- his intent.
What his actions were combine with what was in his mind and his ideology about committing Jihad, a symbolic then if in fact she was deceased to cut her head off. I mean, that's exactly what he was trying to achieve in that moment. Take him for his word and his actions.

PERINO: One of the things I really liked about seeing that and appreciating the interview is that right before it, they talked -- they had a reporter out there who was saying -- to the mosque representative, you were about -- you said you would talk to us and all of a sudden you changed your mind.
The reason that interview I think is important is that you have very little communication coming out of the mosque. That's why there has been the need to do some sort of surveillance at times that they think was a specific threat.

GUILFOYLE: An infiltration.

PERINO: Yeah, that was on the merits.

GUILFOYLE: Yeah.

PERINO: So this information that we get firsthand from somebody that was actually there and then goes back, that he reveals last night, on in that interview because of a law enforcement request is very interesting. She's going to have a second part tonight. I don't know if she asked but I'm kinda -- I'm curious about this question. What led him to the mosque in the first place? What was it that he was.

BECKEL: This guy?

(CROSSTALK)

PERINO: What was he looking for? I think that would give us even a different picture.

GUILFOYLE: And did he come in contact with someone who specifically kind of encouraged him or put the idea in his head. Because it's all about them inspiring and reaching out and trying further the tentacles of terror.

BOLLING: And -- you know, I mean, obviously, I mean, I know the answer to this question, but why do you have to be in silhouette? You have to be in silhouette because if you're a whistleblower in a mosque about Islam, you're likely going to be the next one beheaded or at least threatened.

GUILFOYLE: You're DOA.

BOLLING: Unfortunately, I think about all the other whistleblowers that are on TV. They talk about you know, exposing corruption in the government or exposing corruption in a business or a company or what now. But if you expose corruption or terrorism in a mosque, you're likely risking your life for it.

(CROSSTALK)

GUTFELD: Either that or had a bad hair day.

BOLLING: That too.

GUILFOYLE: It looks like he was wearing a cap.

GUTFELD: Yeah.

BOLLING: Should we go?

(LAUGHTER)
We'll go. Alright, before we go, a programming note, don't miss Greta's big interviews tonight with the prime minister of Israel tonight. PV-net and Yahoo warns about the dire threat of global Jihad. Here's a peek.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

NETANYAHU: The problem is that militant Islam is trying to dominate the Middle East and then take over the world. Its number one target ultimately is the United States. They view all these branches, shiites, radical shiites, radical sunnis, they see you as the great state. They call us the small state because, we're just a frontal position, a forward position of the United States. They want to destroy us so they can get to you.

(END OF VIDEO CLIP)

BOLLING: That's 7.00 p.m. Eastern tonight. Then coming up, instead of focusing on the Jihad crisis, our president is focusing today on helping his party win their election. Dana is all over that here on The Five.

PERINO: So is America better off than it was six years ago? More than half the country says no, according to a recent Fox poll, and that includes 37 percent of Democrats. With the midterms fast approaching, the president is trying to convince voters otherwise, at least when it comes to the economy.
He spoke today.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

BARRACK OBAMA, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA: We can and should be proud of the progress that our country has made over these past six years. It is indisputable that our economy is stronger today than when I took office. I said we would rebuild our economy on a new foundation for growth and prosperity and with dedicated, persistent effort we've actually been laying the cornerstones of this foundation every single day since.

(END OF VIDEO CLIP)

PERINNO: OK. So Eric, let me start with you, our financial expert. Is it not true that you are -- in every recession the country does better six years later? The question is the relevancy -- or I mean, how relative it is to growth and how it's potential.

BOLLING: The most important thing is growth and how soon do you get back to normal growth. It took us six years and we may not be there. Here's the point, though. President Obama today used those words he wrote part of that sound by it says, "It's indisputable" and then went on to say, "by every economic measure America is better off." He said they is -- let's deal in facts. Mr. President, I listened to your speech. I'll deal in facts if you want. These are apples to apples comparisons from the day he took over to today. Median household income is down, that's a fact. Household ownership rate is down, that's a fact. Gasoline prices are up, Way up, that's a fact.
Milk prices are at an all-time high. Up way up. And the last one number of Americans receiving food stamps is way, way up. We know the numbers about labor participation force -- a participation rate is down.

PERINO: Went down.

BOLLING: I mean, I can name 20 different facts that are disputable that America is better off.

BECKEL: How about -- how about some of these facts.

BOLLING: All I'm saying is that he's said, "Let's sure in facts, say it's indisputable and by.

(CROSSTALK)

BECKEL: Is it ever -- 2008 that this country be better off on this day then?

BOLLING: I just gave you 5 minutes.

BECKEL: You're in a whole, close to it did fresh.

BOLLING: How's this. Go to our Facebook, The Five fan Facebook page, whatever it is right now, Facebook.com and I'll put all the facts up for it that show that we're not better off.

BECKEL: Do you mind if I share a few facts too, the number of jobs have grown from 215,000 that a faster pace since 1999. There's been no inflation. The stock market is up. Profits are up in the -- across the board. Still, the wages on .

GUTFELD: Wait a second. I thought you would hate that.

PERONO: Yeah, right.

GUILFOYLE: Bob said.

GUTFELD: I thought you would hate -- profits.

PERINO: Whoa.

GUTFELD: You just had a 400,000 person march against profits.

BECKEL: Who is Louise (ph)

(CROSSTALK)

GUTFELD: You know, he wants to say the economy is on an upward trajectory.
So were North Korean missile tests. It's never happened. He's making middle class households poorer. If being -- making people poor is progress, he is a progressive. It's incredible. I just don't get it, Bob, when you say you're for profits one day and then you're not the previous.

BECKEL: I am always been for profits. I'm not against profits. I understand.

GUILFOYLE: I wanna flag on the play.

BECKEL: I know profits are necessary for growth. I'm not a communist, despite what you may think.

GUTFELD: You have admitted to being a communist.

BECKEL: Well, I said that in jest.

GUILFOYLE: Not this week.

(CROSSTALK)

BECKEL: The point is that he has got the right political thing to do is to move to the economy. He's got some things he can talk about, a thing he can brag about and that's what the democrats need.

PERINO: What I think they're missing and I'm curious where it is, maybe Kimberly we'll get you in on this, which is the bigger idea. So let's give
-- let's stipulate that OK? So we were in a financial crisis and a panic in the fall of 2008. The president takes over. Six years later the country still -- there I'm saying the polling says that they don't feel like its good enough.

GUILFOYLE: Yeah.

PERINO: So where is the big idea? I mean, see the minimum wage piece. But other than that, what is the president talking about? I didn't see anything else that was new today.

GUILFOYLE: No, of course not but this is-- the only the material that he has to work with. Somebody is like here are the cue cards, these are the things we can hit, you have to pivot to the economy. It's a very you know, typical Obama policy speech growth for this many numbers of quarters, he's such a -- he's got to seize on what he can right? Because midterms are coming up so this is a point of crisis. He has to go for what at least he can have something positive to say. The problem is the public, the American people, the voters aren't buying it, so there's a disconnection. So he's just hoping that perception is reality if he says it enough.

BECKEL: Can somebody please give us exactly question was that.

(CROSSTALK)

GUILFOYLE: Well here -- just so you know the Fox News poll of the 9/11.

BECKEL: Yeah, you know the question, the exact question was that.

GUILFOYLE: Voters don't agree with the president's assessment that the country is better off. They dismiss the president's boast as mostly false by a 58 to 36 percent margin. That includes 37 percent of the senate Democrats.

BECKEL: That's right. That's what I thought the question. It was not about their own economic situation.

PERINO: But, Bob, the president is the one who in 60 minutes, he's the who asked -- who posed the question that way. Actually we were just quoting the president in that question.

(CROSSTALK)

PERINO: I want to roll this because the president took a little bit of personal shot at this network today in a speech. Take a look.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

OBAMA: There's a reason fewer republicans, you hear them running around about Obamacare. Because while good, affordable health care might seem like a fanged threat to the freedom of American people,

(LAUGHTER)

On fox news, it turns out it's working pretty well in the real world.

(APPLAUSE)

(END OF VIDEO CLIP)

PERINO: Greg, have you gotten under his skin?

GUTFELD: He bashes at FNC more than ISIS and we don't behead anybody. But you know, the bitter point here if there's anybody in the media that likes the fact that it's not them that he's angry at, you shouldn't be because that means you're a wuss. You're a pliant servant in his harem. The only reason why his coming after Fox News is where the only network that actually tries to challenge him.

(CROSSTALK)

BECKEL: Can I ask you a question? Everybody around this table said six months ago, particularly Eric, run on Obamacare, we're not gonna get it. I don't know a single Republican that's making a case on Obamacare and I don't know any Democrats.

PERINO: I don't know what you're reading because a lot of people -- they're not make it a singular issue but it's one of many issues.

BECKEL: It's one of the many issue. But did remember, this was supposed to be the singular issue.

BOLLING: Because there's so many work.

(LAUGHTER)

(CROSSTALK)

GUILFOYLE: Why would you stick with one? There are ten issues.

BOLLNG: IRS, Ebola, there's this border, the southern border.

BECKEL: Is Ebola his fault too?

BOLLING: No, Bob, you will not get in that.

(CROSSTALK)

BECKEL: I'm not gonna stop yelling.

BOLLING: That Fox News (ph) shot wasn't off the cuff. That was written right? We got an embargo -- a copy of that speech before you delivery it and someone actually wrote that line, so there was the key, back in it wherever they put the speeches together they took a shot at us.

(CROSSTALK)

PERINO: If I would have ever had address speech sent to me that I had for review the president where it took a shot at MSNBC, I think I would have -- I would've been on the ceiling. The thing is, here's the thing, the president never would have said it. President Bush never would have said it.

BOLLING: Can I just respond to Bob. Ebola, five letters, Obama, five letters.

(CROSSTALK)

PERINO: We're going to get an ice bag in the commercial break. And update on the Ebola scare ahead, should the U.S. close their airports to travelers from countries with outbreaks. We'll tell you how the CDC feels about that coming up.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

GUTFELD: It's a great song.

A new website aims to remind everyone that Republicans are people, too, as if that's really possible.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

GRAPHIC: Republicans drive Priuses. Republicans recycle. Republicans listen to Spotify. Republicans put together IKEA furniture. Republicans read The New York Times in public. Republicans have tattoos and beards.
Republicans have feelings. Republicans are people who care. Republicans are people, too.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GUTFELD: I get it. They don't drink the blood of baby pandas after all.

The creator, a former Mitt Romney guy, said he wanted to humanize the right, which makes sense. The media perpetuates Republicans as old and evil, as proxies for the old and evil parents who never hugged them. But righties aren't the only ones trying to change. As elections loom, Dems are morphing into Republicans, firing more guns than Yosemite Sm and drilling like a Black & Decker.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

ALISON LUNDERGAN GRIMES, SENATE CANDIDATE: I'm not Barack Obama. I disagree with him on guns, coal and the EPA. And Mitch, that's not how you hold a gun.

SEN. MARK BEGICH (R), ALASKA: I'm Mark Begich. It took five years, but I got the road approved. Next year, the oil search (ph). I approve this message because sooner or later, Washington will figure out that I don't take no for an answer.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GUTFELD: It is like a bio (ph).

The fact is both the right and left suffer from stereotypical, easily identifiable mannerisms. For liberals, you're a peace-crazed, identity- obsessed, tree-hugging, multi-pierced whiners. See Matt Damon, Janeane Garofalo, Sean Penn, Michael Moore, Rosie O'Donnell, Lena Dunham and Madison, Wisconsin.

For conservatives, you're a white, fundamentalist, war-loving, fuel- guzzling, one percenter. See Montgomery Burns.

But Mr. Obama was able to take his own party's tired cliches and camouflage them with soaring rhetoric, and it worked. It's time now for the Republicans to do the same. But this commercial is not the answer.

You shouldn't be saying we're just like them. You should be saying why you're better than them. You need to focus on why you're right, and you need to do so persuasively with wit, and intelligence and passion. If that's asking too much, then you don't deserve to win. You deserve to continue losing and drinking the blood of baby pandas.

GUILFOYLE: Say you do not endorse that, though.

GUTFELD: It's tasty. Don't knock it until you've tried it. It's great for the skin, Kimberly.

Does this commercial help or hurt the party, or is it basically what they call a push?

GUILFOYLE: OK, I'm going to say it's a little bit of a push. I like the idea of it, but I think the musical score is not going to win any award nominations, people. I mean, you could have had something very cool. I like some of the imagery. But again you also don't want to act like you're so weird that you have to try that hard.

GUTFELD: Yes. It's the trying that hard thing that's the problem. And trying to be cool. If you try to be cool, you never can be. You did not like this ad.

GUILFOYLE: He loved it.

BECKEL: This may be -- I've seen thousands of political ads, and I've done some bad ones myself, but this is by far and away, the worst I think I've ever seen.

When you set and tell people Republicans are white, Republicans are black, Republicans are Hispanic, Republicans are Asian, Republicans read The New York Times in public, Republicans use Macs, Republicans are -- here's this, Republicans are grandmas, daughters and moms. And Republicans enjoy gourmet cooking. Are you kidding me?

GUTFELD: But you know why they do it, Bob?

BECKEL: Yes. Tell me why they do it.

GUTFELD: But they do it, because the media has portrayed Republicans as anything but human, so they have to try to portray themselves as human.

BECKEL: Why don't they do something that's human?

GUTFELD: What, you mean create jobs?

GUILFOYLE: Oh, Bob, you were actually funny up until that point.

GUTFELD: Like protect the country?

BECKEL: I don't think people perceive them as doing things that help people.

GUTFELD: Why is that?

BECKEL: I don't know.

GUTFELD: I do. It's called...

PERINO: Why they're about to win the midterms.

GUTFELD: Eric.

PERINO: I think that the next ad that the Mitt Romney guys should do is just do an ad and say all Democrats are like Bob Beckel. And you can just throw, "It's Bob, it's Bob, it's Bob." Because the name calling against Republicans has been outrageous for years.

GUTFELD: Yes.

PERINO: And I admire this because I understand -- we are not their target audience, OK? I'm not their target audience. I've been a Republican for a long time, I'm comfortable with it.

GUILFOYLE: You should have been in the video.

PERINO: I ignore that. But the younger people, they're trying to appeal to a younger audience. They want younger voters. They have to compete. I hand it to them for giving it a shot. And, you know what? This ad might have been more effective with people who are younger. We are old now.

GUTFELD: Yes.

PERINO: You realize that.

GUTFELD: So I heard somebody say that it felt like a Viagra ad.

GUILFOYLE: Who would say that? Who would say something so provocative?

BECKEL: I'd like to see what a focus group with young people would be on this. And I bet you it would be disastrous.

BOLLING: Very quickly. We don't have a lot of time, but the ad seemed to me to say Republicans are like liberals. Everything that they went through sounded like a liberal.

GUILFOYLE: Right.

BOLLING: The Prius, The New York Times, that kind of stuff. I don't think we need to act more like liberals. I think we need to act more like conservatives.

PERINO: Look, we've lost the last several presidential elections. I think that we've got to try something. I'm for that. Why not just try...

GUTFELD: More tattoos. That's all that means. More tattoos.

PERINO: That's true.

BECKEL: There's an old rule of thumb in politics. You don't remind people of your weaknesses.

GUTFELD: Very good. All right.

Next on "The Five," retired Navy SEAL Marcus Luttrell has a warning for all those toddlers out there who might want to date his 2-year-old daughter one day. I'm an adult and I'm scared. You'll hear it ahead.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

GUILFOYLE: I know.

Well, he is one of the toughest Navy SEALs in U.S. history. You don't want to mess with lone survivor Marcus Luttrell. He's now a dad of two, including a 2-year-old little girl, and he's already issuing a warning to any little boys out there hoping to date her one day.

Now in, a Facebook post that went viral, Luttrell says he's going to make any suitors, quote, "paint the house, mend some fence, cut the lawn, rope a tornado, bottle up a hurricane and put out a forest fire with a squirt gun." Now that would be something you could earn a date.

And when he gets done, then he says he's going to let them have his cell number so they can face time while he holds the phone. So look forward to seeing the first candidate in about 16 years. He is going to be waiting.

Luttrell explained why he's so protective of his daughter on "FOX and Friends" this weekend. Take a listen.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

MARCUS LUTTRELL, FORMER NAVY SEAL: The most important thing to me is the fact that I hope she finds somebody who loves her unconditionally and treats her as well and loves her as much as I love her mother.

I'm not intimidated by anybody. But one of the most frustrating things and intimidating things I ever had to do was when I asked for my wife's hand in marriage. And it's not because I was afraid. I just didn't want to disappoint him. And I never wanted to let him down on how I treated his daughter.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GUILFOYLE: And he does love his wife. He told me a story one time.
Melanie, his wife, is amazing. How when he first saw her, he knew that that was the woman that he wanted to marry, moved right on target.

So I understand his love is deep and very serious about his kids, especially his daughter. Now, Bob, you have a daughter.

BECKEL: Yes.

GUILFOYLE: What -- do you do anything to, like, prevent guys from dating her?

BECKEL: Not quite to that extreme, but I can understand exactly where he's coming from. You've got a little girl, and you're thinking about her going out dating. And the first thing you think about, at least in my case, was what I was like to date, and it was very dangerous.

I kept (ph) it very simple. To the first guy she dated, I said, "Look, her curfew is at 12."

GUILFOYLE: Right.

BECKEL: "If she's back here at 12:01, you're dead. And then after you're dead, your father is dead."

GUILFOYLE: Oh, my gosh.

BECKEL: So he got her home ten minutes early. But the one thing I love about what Luttrell said here is listen to this...

GUILFOYLE: How you work.

BECKEL: ... there ought to be a chastity belt made with a sealed trident engraved on it and "Ask" -- it reads, "Ask father for key."

GUILFOYLE: I think he might be making one right now.

Bolling, you have a son, Eric Chase. What do you think about dating? You treat it different if it's a son, right?

BOLLING: Yes, I think you do. You know, I'm sure there's never going to be a time where my son brings the girl home and says, "Dad, is it OK if I date her?" Look, he's got to go to her; I get it.

Look, there are -- more parents should be like Marcus Luttrell. I mean, I listened to that on Sirius XM. I think it was Saturday morning, and it was fantastic. It was like, wow, that is really, really cool. He said some things that may be considered a little not politically correct. So what?
Who cares? If every father had that attitude, I think kids would be in much better shape.

GUILFOYLE: Yes. And a lot of people watched it; it went viral. They forwarded it. I think it's very funny. I love it, because I lived this, Dana, with my father, who was just like "What time is the dance over?" And I'd have to be home, like, 30 minutes before it ended. Forget about it.

PERINO: I always came 30 minutes -- home 30 minutes before it ended.

BECKEL: I bet you did.

GUILFOYLE: You weren't told to, but you did it anyway. There's the difference between the two of us.

PERINO: I think that what he was describing about the feelings for his daughter is what every father feels when they find out they're going to have a daughter, when the daughter is born if it's a surprise. So I think it's a good thing.

GUILFOYLE: I love it. I love the passion, and you know that she's going to be well guided, you know, by her parents. They're on it.

PERINO: Or she's going to be quite a rebellious person.

GUILFOYLE: We're praying. Yes, Greg, what do you have?

GUTFELD: Well, I don't worry -- I don't worry much about the attitudes of fathers. I worry about the expectations of modern girls. Do they expect less from men these days in how they dress and how they act or the idea of being a gentleman, dressing like a man, having a mature behavior?

I get the impression that, from my limited experience with a niece, that we've had a relaxed formality in the name of progress. Manners and respect should never go out of style, but I feel that they have. You should not honk your horn when you're picking up a date. You go to the door. You should not wear a baseball cap when you show up to meet the parents. You should always be making eye contact.

I get the feeling that lately, because the essence of cool has dictated that people can be more casual and more relaxed about their behavior, it's given women less -- I don't know, less elegant options in the world of men, and that's a bit sad. So I don't -- I don't worry about the father; I worry about the women.

BECKEL: And it's true, too. You look at the pool out there that's available. These guys, where their pants are falling down.

GUILFOYLE: Right.

BECKEL: They've got their baseball caps on sideways. They stink. They don't shave. They're loud-mouthed. It's just unbelievable. I mean, I looked out there and I thought to myself my daughter has got to find a date in this crowd?

PERINO: Yes. And she's in Boulder, Colorado.

BECKEL: And she's in Boulder, Colorado.

GUTFELD: Wow.

PERINO: Well, I'm just saying.

BECKEL: Listen, a lot of the (AUDIO GAP).

GUILFOYLE: Beep.

When "The Five" returns, we're going to have an update on the Ebola scare in America. Should the U.S. be closing our airports to travelers from infected countries to keep us safe? Stay tuned.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

BECKEL: I've got to be very careful here. The U.S. suspended flights to Israel this summer over missile fears. So it begs the question: should we be stopping flights from West Africa, where countries are battling outbreaks of Ebola, particularly since we had one that came into this country. So the question is should we stop flights coming in from countries that have Ebola outbreaks? Eric, what do you think?

BOLLING: I like the idea. A couple of months ago when President Obama made his speech from the CDC, he said one of the things we're going to do is we're going to talk to other governments and airports and make sure that someone doesn't get on a flight, board a flight for the United States, who has Ebola. Clearly, we can't stop that now.

And we know the numbers are somewhere around 13,000 or 14,000 Americans with American passports that are able -- and who are in one of these three countries who could come back here and not even know they have Ebola.

Here's my point. Should the feds mandate it? Maybe not. Should the airlines do it on their own? Probably, like British Airways did.

BECKEL: Dana, what do you think?

PERINO: Well, I think that we have to separate the two issues. So when it came to the Israel Ben Gurion Airport, when it was shut down, that was because of the concern about missiles. It was not -- the Israeli government asked us not to do it, but the United States government decided to do it anyway.

This is different in that you have a disease outbreak, and it is so serious and severe with Ebola that I do think it merits the consideration to shut down those flights and surprised they haven't done it before now.

BECKEL: Are you surprised?

GUILFOYLE: Yes. I agree with Dana wholeheartedly. This seems like a very easy, obvious solution. Why not err on the side of caution? Why wouldn't you, because the alternative is so grave? So why wouldn't you do it so we can secure the situation? If any Americans or people who are infected over there need to get here, we certainly have the means and ability to be able to transport them like we did the two doctors that were infected and get the right tests done.

BECKEL: I think that -- I think that's...

GUILFOYLE: Too much at stake.

BECKEL: What's your view of it?

GUTFELD: Well, thank you for asking.

GUILFOYLE: You're very welcome.

GUTFELD: I love this new, new thoughtful way we're talking about this thing.

BECKEL: Yes.

GUTFELD: I believe this is a very serious issue, and we must ignore insulting or offending people and ask about travel.

BECKEL: We certainly should, please.

GUTFELD: And we should ask about their travel history and curtail travel when we have the opportunity to, because the outbreak in Africa at this point is out of control. And we need to contain that. We need to contain that. I'm being serious.

PERINO: I can't take your...

GUILFOYLE: No, you like it. It's very "Special Report."

GUTFELD: We need to contain -- we need to contain what's going on in Africa before -- I think we have to stop traffic -- travel at some point.

GUILFOYLE: Shut it down.

GUTFELD: And then, when that's under control, we open it. And nobody should get their feelings hurt over this. There should be no political correctness.

BECKEL: You would be -- you would be perfect in a professor lounge now, the way you're dealing with this. I think it was very smart. All those comments were very smart.

I will say one other thing. I don't think there's any way they know if people have Ebola when they get on planes.

BOLLING: And that is the point.

GUILFOYLE: Right.

BOLLING: That whether you fill out the form or the card that says do you have Ebola or have you had contact with someone, if you say no, you may not know you've had contact.

PERINO: May not even know, exactly.

GUILFOYLE: And he knew he did, allegedly.

BOLLING: Someone saying they don't have or had contact with Ebola.

(CROSSTALK)

PERINO: Especially to get out. He knew he had contact with a pregnant woman who died. That's what I just said. The point is allegedly he filled out the form and said that he hadn't had contact with anyone with Ebola.
Maybe he didn't realize.

GUTFELD: But he took her to the hospital, where they said, "We don't have room in the Ebola room for her. She died a few hours later, and they brought her back.

BECKEL: I'm sorry to interrupt here, because it's something we have to do.
Because "One More Thing" is up next.

GUILFOYLE: Please.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

BOLLING: All right. Back for "One More Thing." Dana is first.

PERINO: OK. So one of the biggest stories this week around the world is the protest in Hong Kong. This is a show of amazing force of how many people are basically gathering. They have been pretty peaceful. That doesn't look peaceful. But they actually have been fairly restrained.
There's tens of thousands of people protesting China's heavy hand in Hong Kong. We should make sure that we pay attention to them and support the freedom fighters and people who want democracy over there.

BOLLING: Very, very good. Agreed.

Bobby, you're up.

BECKEL: OK. Michael Phelps is a man who won eight -- I think it was seven or eight gold medals in one Olympics, was stopped for drunk driving in Maryland. He was -- his blood alcohol level was 0.14. He was driving 85 miles an hour in a 45 mile-an-hour zone. He failed sobriety tests.

Now, Mike, my boy, you've got a lot of money. You can afford to get yourself a car service to take you around. And I have a pretty -- my proposal on this is pretty simple. If you get caught for drunk driving at that level, you lose your license for one year. The second time, you lose it for three years. And if you do it three times, you go to jail for five years. It ought to be a felony. Because we lose tens of thousands of people to drunk drivers every year. And thank God when I was drinking and driving I didn't kill anybody, but I think about it all the time.

BOLLING: All right. Greg, you are up.

GUTFELD: All right. On that note, it's time for...

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

GUTFELD: Greg's Medical Tips.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GUILFOYLE: Oh my gosh.

GUTFELD: Well, you know, a lot of people ask me, "Greg, how do I lose weight?" I say you don't have to. A very simple way of appearing 20 pounds lighter is do what this little cat did.

Just jump into a little tub, sit there for a little while, and almost instantly you appear 20 pounds lighter. He was once a fat cat, but look how skinny he is now. And because of this, that cat is now a highly paid fashion model on every catwalk across the world.

PERINO: Oh, my gosh, that's terrible. Cats don't even like water.

GUTFELD: How dare you? That's cat-ist.

BOLLING: All right, K.G., you're up.

GUILFOYLE: It probably is.

On a serious note. Some of you might have been following the legal news today and we were awaiting the sentencing, of course, of Joe and Theresa Giudice. That's Italian pronunciation.

Unfortunately, they both are going to go to jail. For their kids, this is a very sad situation. But she's got 15 months. This is for bank and mail and wire fraud and a host of other charges. They ended up pleading guilty.

The judge is showing some leniency in allowing her to serve the time after the holidays. She has to surrender January 5 and not until she gets -- in case you're worrying about how this is going to work with the children, he will serve time after that, 41 months.

BOLLING: Forty-one months for him, as well.

OK. So yesterday we talked about Mumia, who's going to do the commencement speech at Goddard college. Well, all institutions of higher learning aren't bad. Check out this one. Someone tweeted this to me. Let me get his name. His name is Jeff T, JTGreat88. Tweeted that. Look, a college course at Vincennes University in Indiana watching "The Five."

PERINO: Wow. They must be learning a lot. Their parents will be thrilled.

BOLLING: I'm thrilled.

PERINO: If had you had to write a report, could you please send it to us so that we can get some viewer feedback?

BOLLING: If you're in a college classroom and you do watch "The Five" as part of your curriculum, let us know. Send me a picture on Facebook.

GUILFOYLE: Or post it on "The Five" page.

BOLLING: We've got to go. That's only five seconds left. Bret is next.

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ERIC BOLLING, CO-HOST: Hello, everyone. Eric Bolling along with Kimberly Guilfoyle, Bob Beckel, Dana Perino and Greg Gutfeld, its 5 o'clock in New York City and this is "The Five."

All right in a moment, you're gonna hear some fascinating sound from a Muslim who says he attended the same mosque where the Oklahoma beheading suspect practiced Islam. What he says goes on in private in that mosque will shock you. Plus, this:

(BEGIUN VIDEO CLIP)

"NOOR": The teaching that Islam allows three choices to be made in non-Muslims and eventually they're all going to have to make that choice to convert to live under Islamic rule or die.

(END OF VIDEO CLIP)

BOLLING: As President Bush predicted, we'd be forced to confront an enemy far greater than Al Qaeda if we left Iraq too soon. He was right today. He spoke to Fox News for the very first time about that ominous warning and the state of Iraq today.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

KILMEADE: You knew it in 2007. In fact this is George Bush, President George Bush in 2007 before the surge.

GEORGE W. BUSH, FORMER PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA: Begin withdrawing before our commanders tell us we're ready would be dangerous.
It means that we'd be risking mass killings on a horrific scale. It means increasing the probability that American troops would have to return at some later date to confront an enemy that is even more dangerous.

KILMEADE: How did you know?

BUSH: Well, I know the nature of the enemy. Anybody who kills 3,000 innocents and beheads people because of their religion or because of their point of view is dangerous. Democracy takes time to take hold, and yet there's impatience with that process in the Americans. Americans have got to understand, that the lesson of 9/11 is still important today as it was right after 9/11.

(END OF VIDEO CLIP)

BOLLING: Also what is he think about President Obama's decision to pull our troops out and let terrorists take over the country? Here's more from 43.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

KILMEADE: Martin Dempsey came out as chairman of joint his status says well known the military recommended and we leave a residual force of 10,000 to 15,000, maybe more. Did you feel the same way?

BUSH: I did, yeah. I agreed with General Dempsey's assessment.

(END OF VIDEO CLIP)

BOLLING: Alright, Bob. We'll open it to you because we have a lot of sound from President Bush. Your thoughts on the -- really the first comments since he really predicted what was going on now back in 2007.

BOB BECKEL, CO-HOST: You have to understand where I'm coming from. I don't think any of this would have happened if we hadn't gone to war in Iraq. Saddam Hussein had done a lot of things that were bad but not nearly as bad as these guys. He was being contained, there was a no fly zone, the Kurds were being protected. More importantly, he kept the Iranians in check. When the administration went on, that I assume they believe were accurate stories about weapons of mass destruction, Colin Powell called his performance at the U.N. The most embarrassing thing he'd ever done in his public life when he was forced to give testimony to the U.N. about why there were weapons of mass destruction. The question really is could 10,000 or 15,000 people have been there and for how long, 10, 20, 30, 40 years and would that really have stopped this? You're talking about secretary on violence it was back over 2,000 years. I think it was a bad decision to go in. The end product of it is we're seeing it today.

BOLLING: Maybe the bad decision was to pull out too soon and as we pointed out, George Bush predicted that if we had let pulled out, if we let the residual force in Iraq, maybe we wouldn't have Americans beheaded on tape.

DANA PERINO, CO-HOST: So if you read Thomas Joscelyn of the Weekly Standard, who writes about the enemy and the nature of the enemy as President Bush was describing. But the grand plan was, to build out from Afghanistan Al Qaeda. And now you have all these other groups that have metastasized that are being called different names, but the truth is it is all Al Qaeda. There's a -- there's of two things basically, what President Bush is saying, when he agrees with General Dempsey, it's no different than what Secretary Gates, Secretary Clinton, Secretary Panetta and General Petraeus have all said, the first three of those all in books so they're on record saying that they disagree with the president's decision to leave Iraq at the time -- or not to leave more of a force there. Bob, that is true. I don't know why you're breathing heavy, but that's true.

(CROSSTALK)

BECKEL: I'm not breathing, I'm listening to you.

PERINO: that cabinet secretary.

BOLLING: You know, he breathes heavy all the time.

PERINO: I know, you can see from my point of view he's always like breathing deep. Those are facts. The only people who seem to think that was not a good idea were Obama, Biden and Susan Rice. Now, that's their prerogative and -- but there are consequences for decisions, as you're seeing. The second thing I wanted to mention is we cut the sound bite a little bit too early because I liked the second part of what President Bush said, "In regards to lesson after 9/11 is that Americans need to understand, the west needs to understand, that the human condition around the world matters. And it matters to our national security." That is the broader foreign policy thinking of the Bush administration. I think it's also important, he -- the president didn't give an interview to Brian Kilmeade today to talk about this per se, of course he knew he would be asked about it, I guess. But, the purpose of inviting them down there was to talk about the fourth annual 2015 warrior open that is a big golf tournament that supports Iraqi and Afghanistan war veterans.

BOLLING: Let me bring these guys in. We have a lot more sound to get to. Thoughts on that first interview after --

GREG GUTFELD, CO-HOST: To Bob's point, we have placed troops in countries for decades after wars so it's something that we do to maintain the peace and sometimes it lasts a long time. That war had been won, but it wasn't Obama's war to win, so it was ours to lose. It was like President Obama had moved into a new apartment and somebody had left the shower curtain behind, but that wasn't his shower curtain so he just got rid of it. That's what he did with the Iraq war.

BOLLING: K.G, your thoughts, let me get on K.G. on this one because we got another piece of sound from Bush, go ahead.

KIMBERLY GUILFOYLE, CO-HOST: I just take issue with taking that shot at President Bush and trying to despair a chance (ph) where he's been nothing but a gentleman and a class act, been unbelievably respectful and empathetic to the difficult job that President Obama had.

BOLLING: Stay right there.

(CROSSTALK)

BOLLING: Bob, hold on, that's a great transition to the next one. What does President Bush think of President Obama allowing ISIS to rise in Iraq?
Listen.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

BUSH: The president has to make the choices he thinks are important. I'm not going to second guess our president. I understand how tough the job is.
And to have a former president, you know, bloviating and second-guessing is, I don't think, good for the presidency or the country.

KILMEADE: Does President Obama call you?

BUSH: Well, he called me to tell me that the nation killed Osama bin Laden, are the (inaudible) and the law enforcer are grateful. But now he's been -- you know he's not on a regular basis, which is OK. It doesn't hurt my feelings. It's a decision he has made.

(END OF VIDEO CLIP)

BOLLING: I want to get to Dana in a second, but go ahead.

GUILFOYLE: Well, he goes on to say that he understands President Obama has developed a relationship over six years with people that he trust and that seeks counsel in, so this is the bigger man, I'm saying you know, what I don't mind, if he needs me, I'm here. But the point is there's always lessons to be learned from history and past presidents have had a history of in fact contacting their predecessors. Because, there was something to be cleaned and learned from that, being the one person on opposition to power. And with respect to President Bush, you didn't see him take a shot and say, "told you so. I was right about this. We should have done -- we should have finished the job by allowing the Iraqi people to have the benefit of ongoing support so that we could have not made what the veterans fought for in vain by seeing intensified by them.

BECKEL: Just out of curiosity, what former presidents consulted other presidents for big decisions?

BOLLING: He did.

BECKEL: For what?

BOLLING: Bill Clinton said that Bush called him.

GUILFOYLE: Called him.

BECKEL: Yeah?

BOLLING: There's one.

GUILFOYLE: Twice a year and.

BECKEL: Talking about bringing them is generally presidents don't.

GUILFOYLE: For different with Nixon. Yeah, I mean there's a history of it.

(CROSSTALK)

PERINO: The reason behind with that Bob is because in the Wall Street Journal there was a very important column by Bret Stephens on Tuesday, in which it suggested that President Obama could benefit from a call from -- with President Bush or having a more of a relationship while talking to him. But, that is based on reports from mostly from Bill Clinton but President Bush is comment on -- commented on it as well that, Bush and Clinton developed a good working relationship and a friendship and camaraderie during the Bush administration.

GUILFOYLE: That continues to this day.

PERINO: Yeah.

GUTFELD: The bottom line is President Obama took the surge personally, because he was against us and punished us nationally because of a petulant, adolescent reaction to something that proved him incorrect.

BECKEL: Can you explain to me what you said this over and over again. This war was won. How do you mean it was?

GUTFELD: The surge. The surge -- was the surge a failure?

PERINO: The surge worked.

GUTFELD: There was a vote. There was democracy, there was calm. There was a surge and then it all went to hell.

BECKEL: What about corruption.

GUTFELD: Corruption is around in every start of every country, we know that.

(CROSSTALK)

BECKEL: But if corruption in our country now.

GUILFOYLE: But because the men and women that served the country valiantly felt that they had achieved the goal and everybody who was there that was on the ground knew that we need to keep the position strong so that they could continue to succeed, otherwise it's like pulling the sheet out from under them.

BOLLING: Let's bring this to the today and now, to terror right here at home. There was a Jihad-style beheading here in America a few days ago and the administration can still only call it workplace violence. But listen closely to a man, Megyn Kelly spoke to last night. He says he attended the same mosque where the Oklahoma suspect worshipped, we could roll it there and the terror was taught there.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

"NOOR": To the public, the mosque will not promote terrorism or any kind of radical acts, but when they're among friends and congregants only, they will promote the true teachings of Islam, which include the offer to non Muslims, the choice, rather, that you must convert, live under Islamic rule, or be fought against, Jihad Fisabilillah, Jihad for the sake of Allah.

(END OF VIDEO CLIP)

BOLLING: And the Oklahoma mass was similar (ph) was also exposes the congregation's true feelings about bin Laden and those horrific beheadings.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

NOOR: I had two friends at the mosque. One of them is now an Imam. The men told me that if Osama bin Laden came to their door, they would invite him in and protect him because he was a brother Muslim and we must protect him for those who don't believe.

MEGYN KELLY, THE KELLY FILE HOST: Did they ever discuss the subject of beheadings? Was that ever discussed?

NOOR: The only time that beheadings were discussed was in the means at which you confront the infidel, as this is related into Quran. That when you meet the unbelievers, you should smile at their necks.

(END OF VIDEO CLIP)

BOLLING: Alright Greg, so now, if you need more proof of terrorize.

GUTFELD: Yeah, But we didn't even need to hear it from him. If this victim was already dead, which I think she was, why did he behead her? Because what would be the point? The point is was to spread terror, to send a message, and that makes it terror. So why don't we just compromise and call it workplace terror. Just get rid of the violence. Well, let's all agree one spot and say it happened at the workplace, its terror. By the way, we're so focused on his actions, but in hate crimes, we're always focused on intent. Why is it with this action -- with this crime it's all about the action and not the intent? The opposite will hate crimes.

BECKEL: You know son, the thing about this is, and I've been saying this for a long time, I got beat up by saying you should no more mosques. A lot of this stuff is going on a lot of mosques. They raise money for terrorists, they -- some, not all of them, but a lot of them preach a brand of Islam that is not acceptable. I think in mainstream is long. But, you know, this is not new to me, this is you know, we were pulled back and
(inaudible) I don't think we should have and that they're training a lot of people.

GUTFELD: But I don't think you can say all mosques.

BECKEL: No, I didn't do that. I said some of them.

GUILFOYLE: No. I mean, look, this is again you know, further evidence and further proof and to pick up on more of what you're talking about, yeah, why wouldn't we take him at his words that describe so in -- his intent.
What his actions were combine with what was in his mind and his ideology about committing Jihad, a symbolic then if in fact she was deceased to cut her head off. I mean, that's exactly what he was trying to achieve in that moment. Take him for his word and his actions.

PERINO: One of the things I really liked about seeing that and appreciating the interview is that right before it, they talked -- they had a reporter out there who was saying -- to the mosque representative, you were about -- you said you would talk to us and all of a sudden you changed your mind.
The reason that interview I think is important is that you have very little communication coming out of the mosque. That's why there has been the need to do some sort of surveillance at times that they think was a specific threat.

GUILFOYLE: An infiltration.

PERINO: Yeah, that was on the merits.

GUILFOYLE: Yeah.

PERINO: So this information that we get firsthand from somebody that was actually there and then goes back, that he reveals last night, on in that interview because of a law enforcement request is very interesting. She's going to have a second part tonight. I don't know if she asked but I'm kinda -- I'm curious about this question. What led him to the mosque in the first place? What was it that he was.

BECKEL: This guy?

(CROSSTALK)

PERINO: What was he looking for? I think that would give us even a different picture.

GUILFOYLE: And did he come in contact with someone who specifically kind of encouraged him or put the idea in his head. Because it's all about them inspiring and reaching out and trying further the tentacles of terror.

BOLLING: And -- you know, I mean, obviously, I mean, I know the answer to this question, but why do you have to be in silhouette? You have to be in silhouette because if you're a whistleblower in a mosque about Islam, you're likely going to be the next one beheaded or at least threatened.

GUILFOYLE: You're DOA.

BOLLING: Unfortunately, I think about all the other whistleblowers that are on TV. They talk about you know, exposing corruption in the government or exposing corruption in a business or a company or what now. But if you expose corruption or terrorism in a mosque, you're likely risking your life for it.

(CROSSTALK)

GUTFELD: Either that or had a bad hair day.

BOLLING: That too.

GUILFOYLE: It looks like he was wearing a cap.

GUTFELD: Yeah.

BOLLING: Should we go?

(LAUGHTER)
We'll go. Alright, before we go, a programming note, don't miss Greta's big interviews tonight with the prime minister of Israel tonight. PV-net and Yahoo warns about the dire threat of global Jihad. Here's a peek.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

NETANYAHU: The problem is that militant Islam is trying to dominate the Middle East and then take over the world. Its number one target ultimately is the United States. They view all these branches, shiites, radical shiites, radical sunnis, they see you as the great state. They call us the small state because, we're just a frontal position, a forward position of the United States. They want to destroy us so they can get to you.

(END OF VIDEO CLIP)

BOLLING: That's 7.00 p.m. Eastern tonight. Then coming up, instead of focusing on the Jihad crisis, our president is focusing today on helping his party win their election. Dana is all over that here on The Five.

PERINO: So is America better off than it was six years ago? More than half the country says no, according to a recent Fox poll, and that includes 37 percent of Democrats. With the midterms fast approaching, the president is trying to convince voters otherwise, at least when it comes to the economy.
He spoke today.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

BARRACK OBAMA, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA: We can and should be proud of the progress that our country has made over these past six years. It is indisputable that our economy is stronger today than when I took office. I said we would rebuild our economy on a new foundation for growth and prosperity and with dedicated, persistent effort we've actually been laying the cornerstones of this foundation every single day since.

(END OF VIDEO CLIP)

PERINNO: OK. So Eric, let me start with you, our financial expert. Is it not true that you are -- in every recession the country does better six years later? The question is the relevancy -- or I mean, how relative it is to growth and how it's potential.

BOLLING: The most important thing is growth and how soon do you get back to normal growth. It took us six years and we may not be there. Here's the point, though. President Obama today used those words he wrote part of that sound by it says, "It's indisputable" and then went on to say, "by every economic measure America is better off." He said they is -- let's deal in facts. Mr. President, I listened to your speech. I'll deal in facts if you want. These are apples to apples comparisons from the day he took over to today. Median household income is down, that's a fact. Household ownership rate is down, that's a fact. Gasoline prices are up, Way up, that's a fact.
Milk prices are at an all-time high. Up way up. And the last one number of Americans receiving food stamps is way, way up. We know the numbers about labor participation force -- a participation rate is down.

PERINO: Went down.

BOLLING: I mean, I can name 20 different facts that are disputable that America is better off.

BECKEL: How about -- how about some of these facts.

BOLLING: All I'm saying is that he's said, "Let's sure in facts, say it's indisputable and by.

(CROSSTALK)

BECKEL: Is it ever -- 2008 that this country be better off on this day then?

BOLLING: I just gave you 5 minutes.

BECKEL: You're in a whole, close to it did fresh.

BOLLING: How's this. Go to our Facebook, The Five fan Facebook page, whatever it is right now, Facebook.com and I'll put all the facts up for it that show that we're not better off.

BECKEL: Do you mind if I share a few facts too, the number of jobs have grown from 215,000 that a faster pace since 1999. There's been no inflation. The stock market is up. Profits are up in the -- across the board. Still, the wages on .

GUTFELD: Wait a second. I thought you would hate that.

PERONO: Yeah, right.

GUILFOYLE: Bob said.

GUTFELD: I thought you would hate -- profits.

PERINO: Whoa.

GUTFELD: You just had a 400,000 person march against profits.

BECKEL: Who is Louise (ph)

(CROSSTALK)

GUTFELD: You know, he wants to say the economy is on an upward trajectory.
So were North Korean missile tests. It's never happened. He's making middle class households poorer. If being -- making people poor is progress, he is a progressive. It's incredible. I just don't get it, Bob, when you say you're for profits one day and then you're not the previous.

BECKEL: I am always been for profits. I'm not against profits. I understand.

GUILFOYLE: I wanna flag on the play.

BECKEL: I know profits are necessary for growth. I'm not a communist, despite what you may think.

GUTFELD: You have admitted to being a communist.

BECKEL: Well, I said that in jest.

GUILFOYLE: Not this week.

(CROSSTALK)

BECKEL: The point is that he has got the right political thing to do is to move to the economy. He's got some things he can talk about, a thing he can brag about and that's what the democrats need.

PERINO: What I think they're missing and I'm curious where it is, maybe Kimberly we'll get you in on this, which is the bigger idea. So let's give
-- let's stipulate that OK? So we were in a financial crisis and a panic in the fall of 2008. The president takes over. Six years later the country still -- there I'm saying the polling says that they don't feel like its good enough.

GUILFOYLE: Yeah.

PERINO: So where is the big idea? I mean, see the minimum wage piece. But other than that, what is the president talking about? I didn't see anything else that was new today.

GUILFOYLE: No, of course not but this is-- the only the material that he has to work with. Somebody is like here are the cue cards, these are the things we can hit, you have to pivot to the economy. It's a very you know, typical Obama policy speech growth for this many numbers of quarters, he's such a -- he's got to seize on what he can right? Because midterms are coming up so this is a point of crisis. He has to go for what at least he can have something positive to say. The problem is the public, the American people, the voters aren't buying it, so there's a disconnection. So he's just hoping that perception is reality if he says it enough.

BECKEL: Can somebody please give us exactly question was that.

(CROSSTALK)

GUILFOYLE: Well here -- just so you know the Fox News poll of the 9/11.

BECKEL: Yeah, you know the question, the exact question was that.

GUILFOYLE: Voters don't agree with the president's assessment that the country is better off. They dismiss the president's boast as mostly false by a 58 to 36 percent margin. That includes 37 percent of the senate Democrats.

BECKEL: That's right. That's what I thought the question. It was not about their own economic situation.

PERINO: But, Bob, the president is the one who in 60 minutes, he's the who asked -- who posed the question that way. Actually we were just quoting the president in that question.

(CROSSTALK)

PERINO: I want to roll this because the president took a little bit of personal shot at this network today in a speech. Take a look.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

OBAMA: There's a reason fewer republicans, you hear them running around about Obamacare. Because while good, affordable health care might seem like a fanged threat to the freedom of American people,

(LAUGHTER)

On fox news, it turns out it's working pretty well in the real world.

(APPLAUSE)

(END OF VIDEO CLIP)

PERINO: Greg, have you gotten under his skin?

GUTFELD: He bashes at FNC more than ISIS and we don't behead anybody. But you know, the bitter point here if there's anybody in the media that likes the fact that it's not them that he's angry at, you shouldn't be because that means you're a wuss. You're a pliant servant in his harem. The only reason why his coming after Fox News is where the only network that actually tries to challenge him.

(CROSSTALK)

BECKEL: Can I ask you a question? Everybody around this table said six months ago, particularly Eric, run on Obamacare, we're not gonna get it. I don't know a single Republican that's making a case on Obamacare and I don't know any Democrats.

PERINO: I don't know what you're reading because a lot of people -- they're not make it a singular issue but it's one of many issues.

BECKEL: It's one of the many issue. But did remember, this was supposed to be the singular issue.

BOLLING: Because there's so many work.

(LAUGHTER)

(CROSSTALK)

GUILFOYLE: Why would you stick with one? There are ten issues.

BOLLNG: IRS, Ebola, there's this border, the southern border.

BECKEL: Is Ebola his fault too?

BOLLING: No, Bob, you will not get in that.

(CROSSTALK)

BECKEL: I'm not gonna stop yelling.

BOLLING: That Fox News (ph) shot wasn't off the cuff. That was written right? We got an embargo -- a copy of that speech before you delivery it and someone actually wrote that line, so there was the key, back in it wherever they put the speeches together they took a shot at us.

(CROSSTALK)

PERINO: If I would have ever had address speech sent to me that I had for review the president where it took a shot at MSNBC, I think I would have -- I would've been on the ceiling. The thing is, here's the thing, the president never would have said it. President Bush never would have said it.

BOLLING: Can I just respond to Bob. Ebola, five letters, Obama, five letters.

(CROSSTALK)

PERINO: We're going to get an ice bag in the commercial break. And update on the Ebola scare ahead, should the U.S. close their airports to travelers from countries with outbreaks. We'll tell you how the CDC feels about that coming up.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

GUTFELD: It's a great song.

A new website aims to remind everyone that Republicans are people, too, as if that's really possible.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

GRAPHIC: Republicans drive Priuses. Republicans recycle. Republicans listen to Spotify. Republicans put together IKEA furniture. Republicans read The New York Times in public. Republicans have tattoos and beards.
Republicans have feelings. Republicans are people who care. Republicans are people, too.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GUTFELD: I get it. They don't drink the blood of baby pandas after all.

The creator, a former Mitt Romney guy, said he wanted to humanize the right, which makes sense. The media perpetuates Republicans as old and evil, as proxies for the old and evil parents who never hugged them. But righties aren't the only ones trying to change. As elections loom, Dems are morphing into Republicans, firing more guns than Yosemite Sm and drilling like a Black & Decker.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

ALISON LUNDERGAN GRIMES, SENATE CANDIDATE: I'm not Barack Obama. I disagree with him on guns, coal and the EPA. And Mitch, that's not how you hold a gun.

SEN. MARK BEGICH (R), ALASKA: I'm Mark Begich. It took five years, but I got the road approved. Next year, the oil search (ph). I approve this message because sooner or later, Washington will figure out that I don't take no for an answer.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GUTFELD: It is like a bio (ph).

The fact is both the right and left suffer from stereotypical, easily identifiable mannerisms. For liberals, you're a peace-crazed, identity- obsessed, tree-hugging, multi-pierced whiners. See Matt Damon, Janeane Garofalo, Sean Penn, Michael Moore, Rosie O'Donnell, Lena Dunham and Madison, Wisconsin.

For conservatives, you're a white, fundamentalist, war-loving, fuel- guzzling, one percenter. See Montgomery Burns.

But Mr. Obama was able to take his own party's tired cliches and camouflage them with soaring rhetoric, and it worked. It's time now for the Republicans to do the same. But this commercial is not the answer.

You shouldn't be saying we're just like them. You should be saying why you're better than them. You need to focus on why you're right, and you need to do so persuasively with wit, and intelligence and passion. If that's asking too much, then you don't deserve to win. You deserve to continue losing and drinking the blood of baby pandas.

GUILFOYLE: Say you do not endorse that, though.

GUTFELD: It's tasty. Don't knock it until you've tried it. It's great for the skin, Kimberly.

Does this commercial help or hurt the party, or is it basically what they call a push?

GUILFOYLE: OK, I'm going to say it's a little bit of a push. I like the idea of it, but I think the musical score is not going to win any award nominations, people. I mean, you could have had something very cool. I like some of the imagery. But again you also don't want to act like you're so weird that you have to try that hard.

GUTFELD: Yes. It's the trying that hard thing that's the problem. And trying to be cool. If you try to be cool, you never can be. You did not like this ad.

GUILFOYLE: He loved it.

BECKEL: This may be -- I've seen thousands of political ads, and I've done some bad ones myself, but this is by far and away, the worst I think I've ever seen.

When you set and tell people Republicans are white, Republicans are black, Republicans are Hispanic, Republicans are Asian, Republicans read The New York Times in public, Republicans use Macs, Republicans are -- here's this, Republicans are grandmas, daughters and moms. And Republicans enjoy gourmet cooking. Are you kidding me?

GUTFELD: But you know why they do it, Bob?

BECKEL: Yes. Tell me why they do it.

GUTFELD: But they do it, because the media has portrayed Republicans as anything but human, so they have to try to portray themselves as human.

BECKEL: Why don't they do something that's human?

GUTFELD: What, you mean create jobs?

GUILFOYLE: Oh, Bob, you were actually funny up until that point.

GUTFELD: Like protect the country?

BECKEL: I don't think people perceive them as doing things that help people.

GUTFELD: Why is that?

BECKEL: I don't know.

GUTFELD: I do. It's called...

PERINO: Why they're about to win the midterms.

GUTFELD: Eric.

PERINO: I think that the next ad that the Mitt Romney guys should do is just do an ad and say all Democrats are like Bob Beckel. And you can just throw, "It's Bob, it's Bob, it's Bob." Because the name calling against Republicans has been outrageous for years.

GUTFELD: Yes.

PERINO: And I admire this because I understand -- we are not their target audience, OK? I'm not their target audience. I've been a Republican for a long time, I'm comfortable with it.

GUILFOYLE: You should have been in the video.

PERINO: I ignore that. But the younger people, they're trying to appeal to a younger audience. They want younger voters. They have to compete. I hand it to them for giving it a shot. And, you know what? This ad might have been more effective with people who are younger. We are old now.

GUTFELD: Yes.

PERINO: You realize that.

GUTFELD: So I heard somebody say that it felt like a Viagra ad.

GUILFOYLE: Who would say that? Who would say something so provocative?

BECKEL: I'd like to see what a focus group with young people would be on this. And I bet you it would be disastrous.

BOLLING: Very quickly. We don't have a lot of time, but the ad seemed to me to say Republicans are like liberals. Everything that they went through sounded like a liberal.

GUILFOYLE: Right.

BOLLING: The Prius, The New York Times, that kind of stuff. I don't think we need to act more like liberals. I think we need to act more like conservatives.

PERINO: Look, we've lost the last several presidential elections. I think that we've got to try something. I'm for that. Why not just try...

GUTFELD: More tattoos. That's all that means. More tattoos.

PERINO: That's true.

BECKEL: There's an old rule of thumb in politics. You don't remind people of your weaknesses.

GUTFELD: Very good. All right.

Next on "The Five," retired Navy SEAL Marcus Luttrell has a warning for all those toddlers out there who might want to date his 2-year-old daughter one day. I'm an adult and I'm scared. You'll hear it ahead.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

GUILFOYLE: I know.

Well, he is one of the toughest Navy SEALs in U.S. history. You don't want to mess with lone survivor Marcus Luttrell. He's now a dad of two, including a 2-year-old little girl, and he's already issuing a warning to any little boys out there hoping to date her one day.

Now in, a Facebook post that went viral, Luttrell says he's going to make any suitors, quote, "paint the house, mend some fence, cut the lawn, rope a tornado, bottle up a hurricane and put out a forest fire with a squirt gun." Now that would be something you could earn a date.

And when he gets done, then he says he's going to let them have his cell number so they can face time while he holds the phone. So look forward to seeing the first candidate in about 16 years. He is going to be waiting.

Luttrell explained why he's so protective of his daughter on "FOX and Friends" this weekend. Take a listen.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

MARCUS LUTTRELL, FORMER NAVY SEAL: The most important thing to me is the fact that I hope she finds somebody who loves her unconditionally and treats her as well and loves her as much as I love her mother.

I'm not intimidated by anybody. But one of the most frustrating things and intimidating things I ever had to do was when I asked for my wife's hand in marriage. And it's not because I was afraid. I just didn't want to disappoint him. And I never wanted to let him down on how I treated his daughter.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GUILFOYLE: And he does love his wife. He told me a story one time.
Melanie, his wife, is amazing. How when he first saw her, he knew that that was the woman that he wanted to marry, moved right on target.

So I understand his love is deep and very serious about his kids, especially his daughter. Now, Bob, you have a daughter.

BECKEL: Yes.

GUILFOYLE: What -- do you do anything to, like, prevent guys from dating her?

BECKEL: Not quite to that extreme, but I can understand exactly where he's coming from. You've got a little girl, and you're thinking about her going out dating. And the first thing you think about, at least in my case, was what I was like to date, and it was very dangerous.

I kept (ph) it very simple. To the first guy she dated, I said, "Look, her curfew is at 12."

GUILFOYLE: Right.

BECKEL: "If she's back here at 12:01, you're dead. And then after you're dead, your father is dead."

GUILFOYLE: Oh, my gosh.

BECKEL: So he got her home ten minutes early. But the one thing I love about what Luttrell said here is listen to this...

GUILFOYLE: How you work.

BECKEL: ... there ought to be a chastity belt made with a sealed trident engraved on it and "Ask" -- it reads, "Ask father for key."

GUILFOYLE: I think he might be making one right now.

Bolling, you have a son, Eric Chase. What do you think about dating? You treat it different if it's a son, right?

BOLLING: Yes, I think you do. You know, I'm sure there's never going to be a time where my son brings the girl home and says, "Dad, is it OK if I date her?" Look, he's got to go to her; I get it.

Look, there are -- more parents should be like Marcus Luttrell. I mean, I listened to that on Sirius XM. I think it was Saturday morning, and it was fantastic. It was like, wow, that is really, really cool. He said some things that may be considered a little not politically correct. So what?
Who cares? If every father had that attitude, I think kids would be in much better shape.

GUILFOYLE: Yes. And a lot of people watched it; it went viral. They forwarded it. I think it's very funny. I love it, because I lived this, Dana, with my father, who was just like "What time is the dance over?" And I'd have to be home, like, 30 minutes before it ended. Forget about it.

PERINO: I always came 30 minutes -- home 30 minutes before it ended.

BECKEL: I bet you did.

GUILFOYLE: You weren't told to, but you did it anyway. There's the difference between the two of us.

PERINO: I think that what he was describing about the feelings for his daughter is what every father feels when they find out they're going to have a daughter, when the daughter is born if it's a surprise. So I think it's a good thing.

GUILFOYLE: I love it. I love the passion, and you know that she's going to be well guided, you know, by her parents. They're on it.

PERINO: Or she's going to be quite a rebellious person.

GUILFOYLE: We're praying. Yes, Greg, what do you have?

GUTFELD: Well, I don't worry -- I don't worry much about the attitudes of fathers. I worry about the expectations of modern girls. Do they expect less from men these days in how they dress and how they act or the idea of being a gentleman, dressing like a man, having a mature behavior?

I get the impression that, from my limited experience with a niece, that we've had a relaxed formality in the name of progress. Manners and respect should never go out of style, but I feel that they have. You should not honk your horn when you're picking up a date. You go to the door. You should not wear a baseball cap when you show up to meet the parents. You should always be making eye contact.

I get the feeling that lately, because the essence of cool has dictated that people can be more casual and more relaxed about their behavior, it's given women less -- I don't know, less elegant options in the world of men, and that's a bit sad. So I don't -- I don't worry about the father; I worry about the women.

BECKEL: And it's true, too. You look at the pool out there that's available. These guys, where their pants are falling down.

GUILFOYLE: Right.

BECKEL: They've got their baseball caps on sideways. They stink. They don't shave. They're loud-mouthed. It's just unbelievable. I mean, I looked out there and I thought to myself my daughter has got to find a date in this crowd?

PERINO: Yes. And she's in Boulder, Colorado.

BECKEL: And she's in Boulder, Colorado.

GUTFELD: Wow.

PERINO: Well, I'm just saying.

BECKEL: Listen, a lot of the (AUDIO GAP).

GUILFOYLE: Beep.

When "The Five" returns, we're going to have an update on the Ebola scare in America. Should the U.S. be closing our airports to travelers from infected countries to keep us safe? Stay tuned.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

BECKEL: I've got to be very careful here. The U.S. suspended flights to Israel this summer over missile fears. So it begs the question: should we be stopping flights from West Africa, where countries are battling outbreaks of Ebola, particularly since we had one that came into this country. So the question is should we stop flights coming in from countries that have Ebola outbreaks? Eric, what do you think?

BOLLING: I like the idea. A couple of months ago when President Obama made his speech from the CDC, he said one of the things we're going to do is we're going to talk to other governments and airports and make sure that someone doesn't get on a flight, board a flight for the United States, who has Ebola. Clearly, we can't stop that now.

And we know the numbers are somewhere around 13,000 or 14,000 Americans with American passports that are able -- and who are in one of these three countries who could come back here and not even know they have Ebola.

Here's my point. Should the feds mandate it? Maybe not. Should the airlines do it on their own? Probably, like British Airways did.

BECKEL: Dana, what do you think?

PERINO: Well, I think that we have to separate the two issues. So when it came to the Israel Ben Gurion Airport, when it was shut down, that was because of the concern about missiles. It was not -- the Israeli government asked us not to do it, but the United States government decided to do it anyway.

This is different in that you have a disease outbreak, and it is so serious and severe with Ebola that I do think it merits the consideration to shut down those flights and surprised they haven't done it before now.

BECKEL: Are you surprised?

GUILFOYLE: Yes. I agree with Dana wholeheartedly. This seems like a very easy, obvious solution. Why not err on the side of caution? Why wouldn't you, because the alternative is so grave? So why wouldn't you do it so we can secure the situation? If any Americans or people who are infected over there need to get here, we certainly have the means and ability to be able to transport them like we did the two doctors that were infected and get the right tests done.

BECKEL: I think that -- I think that's...

GUILFOYLE: Too much at stake.

BECKEL: What's your view of it?

GUTFELD: Well, thank you for asking.

GUILFOYLE: You're very welcome.

GUTFELD: I love this new, new thoughtful way we're talking about this thing.

BECKEL: Yes.

GUTFELD: I believe this is a very serious issue, and we must ignore insulting or offending people and ask about travel.

BECKEL: We certainly should, please.

GUTFELD: And we should ask about their travel history and curtail travel when we have the opportunity to, because the outbreak in Africa at this point is out of control. And we need to contain that. We need to contain that. I'm being serious.

PERINO: I can't take your...

GUILFOYLE: No, you like it. It's very "Special Report."

GUTFELD: We need to contain -- we need to contain what's going on in Africa before -- I think we have to stop traffic -- travel at some point.

GUILFOYLE: Shut it down.

GUTFELD: And then, when that's under control, we open it. And nobody should get their feelings hurt over this. There should be no political correctness.

BECKEL: You would be -- you would be perfect in a professor lounge now, the way you're dealing with this. I think it was very smart. All those comments were very smart.

I will say one other thing. I don't think there's any way they know if people have Ebola when they get on planes.

BOLLING: And that is the point.

GUILFOYLE: Right.

BOLLING: That whether you fill out the form or the card that says do you have Ebola or have you had contact with someone, if you say no, you may not know you've had contact.

PERINO: May not even know, exactly.

GUILFOYLE: And he knew he did, allegedly.

BOLLING: Someone saying they don't have or had contact with Ebola.

(CROSSTALK)

PERINO: Especially to get out. He knew he had contact with a pregnant woman who died. That's what I just said. The point is allegedly he filled out the form and said that he hadn't had contact with anyone with Ebola.
Maybe he didn't realize.

GUTFELD: But he took her to the hospital, where they said, "We don't have room in the Ebola room for her. She died a few hours later, and they brought her back.

BECKEL: I'm sorry to interrupt here, because it's something we have to do.
Because "One More Thing" is up next.

GUILFOYLE: Please.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

BOLLING: All right. Back for "One More Thing." Dana is first.

PERINO: OK. So one of the biggest stories this week around the world is the protest in Hong Kong. This is a show of amazing force of how many people are basically gathering. They have been pretty peaceful. That doesn't look peaceful. But they actually have been fairly restrained.
There's tens of thousands of people protesting China's heavy hand in Hong Kong. We should make sure that we pay attention to them and support the freedom fighters and people who want democracy over there.

BOLLING: Very, very good. Agreed.

Bobby, you're up.

BECKEL: OK. Michael Phelps is a man who won eight -- I think it was seven or eight gold medals in one Olympics, was stopped for drunk driving in Maryland. He was -- his blood alcohol level was 0.14. He was driving 85 miles an hour in a 45 mile-an-hour zone. He failed sobriety tests.

Now, Mike, my boy, you've got a lot of money. You can afford to get yourself a car service to take you around. And I have a pretty -- my proposal on this is pretty simple. If you get caught for drunk driving at that level, you lose your license for one year. The second time, you lose it for three years. And if you do it three times, you go to jail for five years. It ought to be a felony. Because we lose tens of thousands of people to drunk drivers every year. And thank God when I was drinking and driving I didn't kill anybody, but I think about it all the time.

BOLLING: All right. Greg, you are up.

GUTFELD: All right. On that note, it's time for...

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

GUTFELD: Greg's Medical Tips.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GUILFOYLE: Oh my gosh.

GUTFELD: Well, you know, a lot of people ask me, "Greg, how do I lose weight?" I say you don't have to. A very simple way of appearing 20 pounds lighter is do what this little cat did.

Just jump into a little tub, sit there for a little while, and almost instantly you appear 20 pounds lighter. He was once a fat cat, but look how skinny he is now. And because of this, that cat is now a highly paid fashion model on every catwalk across the world.

PERINO: Oh, my gosh, that's terrible. Cats don't even like water.

GUTFELD: How dare you? That's cat-ist.

BOLLING: All right, K.G., you're up.

GUILFOYLE: It probably is.

On a serious note. Some of you might have been following the legal news today and we were awaiting the sentencing, of course, of Joe and Theresa Giudice. That's Italian pronunciation.

Unfortunately, they both are going to go to jail. For their kids, this is a very sad situation. But she's got 15 months. This is for bank and mail and wire fraud and a host of other charges. They ended up pleading guilty.

The judge is showing some leniency in allowing her to serve the time after the holidays. She has to surrender January 5 and not until she gets -- in case you're worrying about how this is going to work with the children, he will serve time after that, 41 months.

BOLLING: Forty-one months for him, as well.

OK. So yesterday we talked about Mumia, who's going to do the commencement speech at Goddard college. Well, all institutions of higher learning aren't bad. Check out this one. Someone tweeted this to me. Let me get his name. His name is Jeff T, JTGreat88. Tweeted that. Look, a college course at Vincennes University in Indiana watching "The Five."

PERINO: Wow. They must be learning a lot. Their parents will be thrilled.

BOLLING: I'm thrilled.

PERINO: If had you had to write a report, could you please send it to us so that we can get some viewer feedback?

BOLLING: If you're in a college classroom and you do watch "The Five" as part of your curriculum, let us know. Send me a picture on Facebook.

GUILFOYLE: Or post it on "The Five" page.

BOLLING: We've got to go. That's only five seconds left. Bret is next.

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