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The Five

Does hashtag diplomacy work?

This is a rush transcript from "The Five," May 9, 2014. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated.

ERIC BOLLING, CO-HOST: Hello, everyone. I'm Eric Bolling, along with Kimberly Guilfoyle, Bob Beckel, Dana Perino, and Jesse Watters.

It's 5 o'clock in New York City, and this is "The Five."

(MUSIC)

BOLLING: So, does #diplomacy work? Three hundred girls were kidnapped in Nigeria by the Muslim terror group Boko Haram. It caused outrage around the world. Celebrities like Ellen DeGeneres and P. Diddy have taken to Twitter with a #bringbackourgirls. Now, members of the political class like Michelle Obama and Senator Dick Durbin are entering the fray.

Is #activism a fad or is this actually becoming a part of American foreign policy? Rush Limbaugh thinks for one it's a joke.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

RUSH LIMBAUGH, RADIO HOST: I think this is pathetic. I'm just stunned. We've got 300 Nigerian girls kidnapped by an al Qaeda group. And nobody cared to talk about it for a while. Hillary wouldn't call them a terror group. Now, all of a sudden, for some reason, we're on a big push to get them back and this is how -- the sad thing here is that the low- information crowd that's puddling around out there on Twitter is going to think we're actually doing something about it. It is just unbelievable. Bring back our girls. They are Nigerian.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

BOLLING: K.G., Rush goes on to say are we this powerless that that's all we got is a hashtag?

KIMBERLY GUILFOYLE, CO-HOST: Yes. I mean, it is sad. It's a hashtag. They're holding up a sign. I understand their hearts are in the right, you know, place. But I would like to see some movement, some action, some leadership in a real significant way, meaning results- oriented.

Doesn't everybody want that and shouldn't have matter about the young Nigerian boys that were murdered as well? So, listen, I hope they come home. I hope they rescue them. That's what's forefront in my mind.

BOLLING: All right. Big boy, you got a dilemma here, my man. You're anti war. You said you were an anti war activist? Now, what do you do -- do you send American -- do you put Americans lives at risk --

BOB BECKEL, CO-HOST: Well, first, I think it's a little premature to say that we're not doing anything. We've sent military people over there.

(CROSSTALK)

BECKEL: Well, wait a minute, you don't know everything that's going on. Something like this, there's a lot of stuff going on behind the scenes and the public doesn't know about. My guess is there's a lot of Americans, a lot of intel going over there and it's a lot more than a hashtag.

I'm a little surprised by old Rush, which, by the way, using Rush is such an unusual thing for the show. But the -- he said it's Nigerian girls. What does he mean by that?

BOLLING: I'm not sure. I'm not going to put words in Rush's mouth.

JESSE WATTERS, CO-HOST: I think he means they are not American girls.

DANA PERINO, CO-HOST: So, the question is the hashtag is #bringbackourgirls. He's being specific to our -- meaning our --

(CROSSTALK)

PERINO: But I think that is actually just a hashtag that started actually in Nigeria. It didn't start here.

BOLLING: Dana, John McCain said we should mobilize our assets. He even suggested using our drone capabilities. Your thoughts on that?

PERINO: So, if we had the intel and we could have a strike that where you could take out the terrorists and protect innocent life, then, yes, of course. That is exactly what that kind of technology should be used for.

You know, how this -- the hashtag thing if nothing else is being done, then I agree that it is ridiculous. However, there are ways to mobilize things. Sometimes, it takes a little bit of time, but I was thinking about the One Campaign and global anti-poverty efforts have started like early 2001, 2002, 2003 and everybody wore those little bracelets, and it wasn't because we thought that the bracelet was actually going to do anything but it was part of a solidarity with a movement to move forward.

And if you think of the Green Revolution in Iran, remember, that was really fueled by Twitter. And one of the criticisms of President Obama and the administration was that they did not do enough to try to capitalize on the social media spreading of that message. So, by itself, does the hashtag do anything? Absolutely not. Does it make you look cool if you're a part of the #bringbackourgirls thing? Yes.

What they should have done is why not -- if you really want to not make it partisan, find somebody else from across the aisle or get a lot of women together from Republicans and Democrats, and whoever else, and do it altogether. Instead, it's a thing that's being mocked from the right to the left, and vice versa, left to right.

BOLLING: Jesse, what about the celebs, the Hollywood elites now jumping on the bandwagon? Is that bandwagon activism? And if it is, maybe we want that.

WATTERS: I mean, I think they are taking their cues from Michelle Obama obviously. Kim Kardashian, all of a sudden, she starts tweeting about this. You kind feel like --

BECKEL: She doesn't know where Nigeria is.

(CROSSTALK)

WATTERS: Of course not.

Anything that makes these celebrities feel good, it makes them feel connected. It makes them feel emphatic. But they don't know the difference between Nigeria and Angola.

But if Michelle Obama have gone up and said #whatabouttheSyriangirls? They would have done the same thing. I think it's selective outrage.

BOLLING: Do we risk American lives to save these Nigerian women?

WATTERS: I mean, logistically, they have 300 girls captive. If you go in, they're just going to start slaughtering them. So, I don't know if it makes a ton of sense. But like you said, they're going to get intel in these guys, and in a few weeks, we're going to send a drone to northern Nigeria and just zap these guys.

BOLLING: We're going to drone their butts.

All right. Let's move on --

(CROSSTALK)

PERINO: One other thing -- in 2005, a point in our history that doesn't get as much attention as it probably deserves, 2005, about 200 marines were sent to Liberia and they liberated that country from a dictator, 200 marines. I don't believe there was any loss of life from our side.

So, with intel and our capabilities and technology, you can actually -- if you decide it's in your national interests, you can do more.

BECKEL: I know you want to move on, but just very quickly, the Arab Spring literally was directed by Twitter.

BOLLING: It was certainly organized. It certainly organized --

GUILFOYLE: Dana, just a quick follow-up for your statement? What do you think? Do you feel that this is something that can make a legitimate case that it is in our national interests?

PERINO: The girls in Nigeria?

GUILFOYLE: Yes.

PERINO: I think so. I could be persuaded, but I actually would say that's true in Syria as well, because I think when you have 8,000 children killed by chemical weapons -- some by chemical weapon in Syria, then, yes, I think we should have done something there, too.

GUILFOYLE: There as well.

BOLLING: I have to move on the next one. On Benghazi today, Democrats still haven't decided whether they'll participate in a new investigation into the deadly attack on our consulate. Nancy Pelosi and her liberal colleagues don't seem to think Americans deserve answers.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

REP. NANCY PELOSI (D-CA), MINORITY LEADER: This is a stunt. This is a political stunt. Either people have gotten tired of Benghazi, but they never knew about it in the first place. So, let's not be accomplices to this diversionary tactic.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

BOLLING: Well, Democrats have been accusing Republicans of trying to fundraise off Benghazi. Tom Cotton, an Army vet, took to the House floor today to expose their hypocrisy.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

REP. TOM COTTON (R), ARKANSAS: When I was leading troops in Iraq in 2006, men and women were being shot at and blown at by al Qaeda, where was the outrage, as they fundraise endlessly off the Iraq war? Where was the outrage as they viciously attacked our commanders? Where was the outrage when they said that soldiers were war criminals?

(END VIDEO CLIP)

BOLLING: What about it, Bob?

BECKEL: Well, some of those comments that were made obviously way out of place, but let's keep in mind the difference between Iraq and what's going on in Benghazi, there were 6,500 Americans killed in Iraq and 32,000 injured badly. And so, I think it's a little different when you are talking about trying to stop a war at that size and you are talking about Benghazi. I don't think it's equivalent.

BOLLING: It's different?

WATTERS: The one thing, I think it's not just that they were fundraising off Iraq, they're fundraising school shootings, Sandy Hook, Columbine, and then to all of a sudden say, you are not able to fund raise off Benghazi, which is a legitimate scandal, is really hypocritical. Both sides do it. It does look sleazy. You raised money after 9/11, you raised money after Katrina.

These things happen in politics but it's a little hypocritical for the left to go after the Republicans. I think the Republicans stuck to their guns, they're not going to cave on this. I think the left thought that the media was going to echo this sentiment and they didn't. So, I think they're going to --

BECKEL: Yes, the same congressman said that Republicans shouldn't be raising money on Benghazi and they are.

BOLLING: No, no, I'm not sure he said that. I'm saying --

BECKEL: Yes, he did.

BOLLING: OK. But let me put this way. I don't think it's consistent across all Republicans. Some say they won't raise money off Benghazi and some say they will.

And let me frame this properly -- what they say raise money off of Benghazi, that sounds terrible. What they mean is they're going to run and say, I'm a Republican, I want more answers into what happened in Benghazi. So, therefore, you should elect more people like me versus a Democrat who doesn't even want answers in Benghazi.

GUILFOYLE: That's how you frame it? Is that not OK to do? Because maybe there are Americans out there I want to vote for a candidate who is actually interested in getting to the bottom of investigations and not saying it's just politics and actually want to hold an administration accountable? The problem is transparency. It sounds good to me.

BOLLING: Dana, should Republicans shy away from raising money in something as important as Benghazi?

PERINO: Not my style. I like how you frame it. I can understand that in terms of judgment and character, you should want more people like me in Washington compared to people like this who call getting to the bottom of something a stunt. I actually understand that.

Now, there is a select committee and Trey Gowdy is in the chair position. Because he is so credible and he is well-respected on both sides, I think that everybody else, at least on the political side of things, just follow his lead. And if I were there, I would say, Trey Gowdy and his spokesperson are the only two people that are speaking on this. And if they ask questions without speechifying, no theatrics.

Remember, Bob, the whole like watermelon and the gun thing during the Vince Foster situation, that was a stunt and the theatrical event that didn't help on the PR side. I don't think they need to.

One other thing just -- when they -- when Democrats say, "This is a stunt, don't pay attention," that is a message aimed directly to the left and to the media, to other media to say, don't bother covering this, but I would like to propose something. I would love -- I would help organize a debate between someone like Steve Hayes and pick anybody from the mainstream media that was supposed to be covering Benghazi, one neutral moderator and let them see -- let the American people decide if this is just a stunt or a legitimate investigation.

BOLLING: Hang on, Jesse. I know you want to jump in. Just do me a favor. One quick time around, because we have another topic. Should the Democrats show up, yes or no?

WATTERS: I would say, yes, they should if they don't -- look, there's going to be seven Republicans kicking Hillary Clinton's butt out there. If they're not there to change the narrative and give her a little break during the hearing, then they're going to get screwed.

PERINO: Agreed. And so, they don't know what else is out there. That document that surprised everybody last week that was withheld by the administration, where there is one document, there's probably more.

BOLLING: Bob, should they show up?

BECKEL: Absolutely not. There's only two questions left? Where did the video come from? And who did the stand-down? That's it, period.

(CROSSTALK)

WATTERS: And why wasn't there security at the embassy?

BOLLING: And, K.G., should they show up? Maybe to get those answers.

GUILFOYLE: Absolutely. You've got to show up. You have all the facts, all the information. Otherwise, how can you say you're a credible candidate if you're not willing to go in there and answer questions and participate?

BECKEL: Because it's a campaign rally for Republicans.

GUILFOYLE: Well, that's your case.

BOLLING: Let's do this one -- from Boko Haram to Benghazi, to Beverly Hills, where protests are growing wider over the sultan of Brunei's Sharia law. Celebrities and others are boycotting the sultan's famed Beverly Hills Hotel, along with the Hotel Bel-Air after he imposed the harsh Islamic law in his country.

Jesse, why don't you take this one, first?

WATTERS: It's funny to me how the left is all of a sudden realizing that fanatical Muslims hate homosexuals and hate women.

PERINO: Yes.

WATTERS: And it's a little hypocritical for Hollywood who perpetuates violence against women in all their movies. Ands they're all of a sudden outrage that women are mistreated.

And speaking of this, the homosexual situation, there's a gay teen pedophile ring going around right now in Hollywood and they're circling the wagons around these people out there. But all of a sudden, everyone is outrage. I mean, Muslims (INAUDIBLE) people all of the time all over the world, but if you're going to stone a Muslim who happens to be gay, then Hollywood gets upset? It's crazy.

BOLLING: But it's OK. Look, that's American protest right there, right? Free market?

PERINO: I don't understand. I agree with Jesse, like now the complaint is that they don't want to go to this hotel anymore? I mean, there are plenty of places in Hollywood where you can pay $22 for a martini that they are not looking for opportunity in that regard.

BOLLING: It's famed. It's got history, Bob. Have you been to Beverly Hills Hotel?

BECKEL: Yes, I had, but I didn't know it was owned by Brunei.

Listen, I would find every single economic investment that Brunei has got and I would boycott it. I would take anybody, any country that has Sharia law and I would stop doing economic trade with them, including the Saudis, I might add. We've just allowed this -- Sharia law is -- it is the most amazing human rights violator on anything that's ever been known in the face of this earth. And therefore, you reward by taking everything away from them.

BOLLING: It's so difficult, K.G. The global economy so intertwined. There's no way of -- there's no way of calling out everything they own.

GUILFOYLE: No, but if you are made aware of it and you find out, there's plenty of great hotels in Los Angeles, like the Peninsula or Four Seasons. So, I would say there. True.

BOLLING: (INAUDIBLE)

GUILFOYLE: Well, you know, they're not into Sharia law.

BOLLING: We're going to leave -- let's hope they're not into Sharia law.

Next on "The Five," some controversial comments today from Pope Francis regarding world poverty. We'll tell you what he said.

Plus, Mitt Romney breaks from some in his party on the minimum wage. Why he thinks it should be raised, when "The Five" returns.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

PERINO: Pope Francis is asking the world to do more to help people out of poverty and his words today are making some headlines. Earlier, the pontiff called on governments around the globe to redistribute wealth to the poor in a new spirit of generosity. He's urging the United Nations to help get rid of what he calls the economy of inclusion.

So, this has been an issue for a while because I think it's been a year that the pope has been there at the Vatican and he wrote a paper that got a lot of attention and we -- also President Obama is talking a lot about income inequality.

And this question has come up. Eric, we were talking about before, I don't find the pope's comments that controversial because I feel like I can hear what he's trying to say, in terms of the message of what I learned, what we all learned, when you go to Sunday school, and you're taught by your parents what Jesus would have taught.

But this is causing some controversy because the question is, how does the U.N. get involved?

BOLLING: Look, let me clarify this. I love Pope Francis.

PERINO: Oh, I know you do.

BOLLING: I love everything he's doing.

This is controversial because he's asking the government's to redistribute wealth. When the church says the government around the world, you know, take money from your more wealthy, give it to your poor.

It's no surprise. I mean, this is -- Pope Francis has been about the poverty stricken his entire life. That's his -- he's championed that cause straight through.

It just has become controversial. I don't think it's going to change his legacy. I think he's a wonderful pope. I think he's bringing Christians together in a fantastic way.

PERINO: Well, that makes people talk about it.

BOLLING: Right.

PERINO: And I want -- Kevin Williamson who's "National Review" and one of my favorite columnist, he wrote a piece about this a while ago, but it was -- I thought of it today and I want to pull up one sentence. He says, "To give away wealth presumes the existence of that wealth. Giving away all that you own does not do the poor an iota of good if you don't have anything. You can't spread the wealth without wealth. Capitalism is the precondition of generosity. If you want to feed the Lord's sheep, you must begin by planting the fields."

And, Bob, I think that capitalism actually makes people more generous, at least through charitable givings and that's how the church actually is able to further a lot of its message.

BECKEL: Americans have the highest generosity in terms of contributing to charity of any country in the world, but what the pope is saying is right. He's been in a lot of countries where there's a very small percentage of oligarchs and everybody else is poor. We ain't too far away from that.

And he's making the point about minimum wage and redistributing help, good for him. I'm glad he's saying it. Bring it into the forefront, and not just have liberal say it. It is time for us to take people in this country and not have the minimum wage that keeps them in poverty and hungry.

PERINO: Well, Kimberly, actually, if you look around the world, maybe what is more actually needed is more capitalism. I mean, most of the poor living in places where you don't have capitalism and it's socialism or worse.

GUILFOYLE: Yes. Well, without capitalism, how can you have economic growth? How can you have new job development?

That's what I don't understand. They want everything but they don't want to do what it takes to get it. That's like, hey, push that car down the road. I'm sorry, you made me take the wheels off, how am I going to get it there? It doesn't make any sense to me.

Before -- you know, I'm sure people are very excited on the left that the pope said this. Bless them. But, you know, he also was definitely a champion against socialism in Argentina. So, there's a little bit of a dichotomy there.

But nevertheless, I think his heart is in the right place but he is the pope and he is the head of the church. That's why he's not running the government, right? It makes sense.

PERINO: But he does have political influence.

WATTERS: Right. I think the left is using the pope here a little bit. I mean, whenever he says anything about abortion, the left is either silent or they try to marginalize him as some sort of old fashion bigot. But today, if you look at the story, it's on every mainstream Web site. It's on every left wing Web site.

And the minute he says redistribution, they are going to glom on to this and use this to force their socialist agenda. But I do think they may be distorting his words a little bit. I think maybe some of this was lost in translation. There's more of an empathetic play. He's not a socialist. He's not a Marxist.

I may disagree with his objective about how to get there. I think free market capitalism probably is the best way to address poverty. I have deep respect for the pope --

(CROSSTALK)

BECKEL: He's just looking out for the poor. Do you recognize the poor treated badly? Not only in the third world, but in this country as well?

WATTERS: Listen, if the pope is going to go out there and let's say slash taxes, climate change is a hoax, let's deregulate the economy -- I mean, all hell would break loose. Let's be honest. I mean, he knows what he's talking --

(CROSSTALK)

BECKEL: But he won't say it because none of that is right.

PERINO: Well, let's just bring up. Can we do one other topic? Which is that former Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney was on "Morning Joe" this morning. He was talking about minimum wage and he's for it and he's against it. Now, he's for raising it.

Listen.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP

MITT ROMNEY (R), FORMER PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE: I, for instance, as you know, part company with many of the conservatives of my party on the issue of the minimum wage. I think we ought to raise it, because, frankly, our party is all about more jobs and better pay. And I think communicating that is important to us.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

PERINO: OK. So, showing on the right big tent, lots of different philosophies, they don't necessarily walk in lock step. Eric, would you think -- we've talked about this at the state level, minimum wages have been raised. He didn't clarify though.

BOLLING: No, they were asking about a federal -- by the way, if you get a chance, that was one of best interviews I've seen Mitt Romney give. It was --

PERINO: A couple of years too late.

BOLLING: Exactly. It was two years too late, because had Morning Joe and Mika asked the question asked today two years ago, he may have a different outcome in the election. That guy was fantastic.

However, this bothered me. This minimum wage thing bothers me a lot, because he went back to raising a federal minimum wage, instead of letting the states decide on their own, which I believe, you know, in states rights to figure out what their minimum wage should be.

Personally, I think there shouldn't be one at all. But he went there and he said, and I'm trying to figure out what was the purpose of doing that. He's not running for president. He says I'm not running for president. It's not going to help out anyone that he endorses going down the road to say, hey, Mitt Romney thinks raising the minimum wage federally is a good idea.

I didn't understand why he was going there.

PERINO: But, Bob, is he trying to maybe move the party in a direction that he thinks it should go?

BECKEL: Well, maybe. You said a big tent, though. I don't know anybody on that tent on minimum wage who is a Republican besides Romney. I applaud him for that. And --

PERINO: Well, that's untrue. Pawlenty, Santorum, a lot of people are being very specific about that the Republican Party --

BECKEL: I stand corrected.

WATTERS: Even your best friend Bill O'Reilly thinks we should raise the minimum wage.

BECKEL: Well, good for Billy.

PERINO: Your best friend for real.

BECKEL: But the point is, a lot of states are tied to the federal minimum wage, and at $7.25, people cannot get out of poverty and they go to bed hungry at night.

PERINO: But then what about the issue of increased regulations and the other taxes, and just in terms of energy costs? If you're -- we're always going to be chasing, Kimberly --

GUILFOYLE: Right.

PERINO: -- the minimum wage that will never actually solve the problem that Bob talks about.

GUILFOYLE: Yes, that's going to remain perpetually insufficient, right? So, that's the problem. So, you have to think about --

BECKEL: $10.10 is not sufficient. That will work.

(CROSSTALK)

PERINO: For how long, Bob.

BOLLING: Bob, I can stop you.

The CBO has scored it. If you raise the minimum wage to $10.10, you are going to cut out 500,000 jobs in America. You're going to --

(CRROSSTALK)

GUILFOYLE: Eliminate.

BOLLING: -- five hundred thousand people to the unemployment. Is that what you want?

BECKEL: They also said that 2 million people will be risen out of poverty.

(CROSSTALK)

BOLLING: So the five people in a room, four is going to get a raise and one is going to get fired. That's a program you want.

BECKEL: I want people to be out of poverty in this country and that minimum wage keeps them in poverty.

BOLLING: I've got news for you, 500,000 people will be poverty --

BECKEL: Maybe.

PERINO: Not only that, but this week, Jesse, there was a report that showed that entrepreneurial spirit of America has just been constantly declining with less people trying to create more businesses, and I can understand the goal of wanting to get people out of poverty but not at the expense, if you can't --

GUILFOYLE: Of job creation.

PERINO: -- if nobody has, nobody is creating jobs, then what have we solved?

WATTERS: Right. You know, the whole minimum wage thing, just like the income inequality thing, it's a dodge. The policies have failed. They haven't created more good paying jobs. So, they try to nickel and dime this stuff on the fringes to drum up the base and stuff like that. And the media goes along with it and people follow along with that. It doesn't create growth and jobs.

(CROSSTALK)

BECKEL: Every state that has raised the minimum wage about $10 has not lost a single job.

WATTERS: And it only affects like a couple of hundred thousand people. This is not something that's going to like lift the whole country out of poverty.

BOLLING: It's 1.6 million people on minimum wage right now in America, but you are going to lose 500,000 of them.

BECKEL: Maybe you'll lose them.

GUILFOYLE: Listen to what he's saying, Bob.

PERINO: I also love how the liberals who hated Mitt Romney so much because of his policies -- what they said that he was only for the rich people, now they love him.

WATTERS: Right.

PERINO: I mean --

(CROSSTALK)

BECKEL: Republicans said you should elect them because he understands business and he understands how (INAUDIBLE). There you got your business guy telling you ought to raise the minimum wage.

PERINO: No, but we voted for him.

GUILFOYLE: What part of the scorecard don't you get?

PERINO: All right. We're going to move on. Ahead, two Christian brothers lose their show on HGTV. Did their faith cause them their jobs? They think so. And that's up next.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

GUILFOYLE: Well, are Christians who hold -- Bob, you with me? -- who hold traditional beliefs welcome to work at HGTV? Well, it doesn't appear that way after twin brothers Jason and David Benham's new show on the network was abruptly canceled this week.

Now, they were supposed to star in a reality show called "Flip it Forward," but HGTV yanked the series after some people were upset about their traditional views on marriage, abortion, and more.

Now, HGTV was apparently offended by these remarks.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

DAVID BENHAM, SHOW CANCELED BY HGTV (via phone): If 87 percent of Americans are Christians, and yet we have abortion on demand, we have no fault divorce, we have pornography and perversion, we have homosexuality an agenda that's attacking the nation, we have adultery, we have all of the things -- I mean, we even have allowed demonic ideologies to take our universities, our public school systems, while the church sits silent and just builds big churches.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GUILFOYLE: Now, the Benham brothers are standing by their faith and their values. Now Eric interviewed them for "The O'Reilly Factor" tonight, and here's a sneak peek.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

D. BENHAM: The agenda that we're dealing with in America right now is an environment whereby it seeks to silence those that disagree with it, and it begins with Christians.

When HGTV released us, it saddened us. It was actually sad for the executives that had us on the call. But our response to them was, "Hey, thanks for the opportunity, and good luck."

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GUILFOYLE: Eric, congratulations. You got that interview. It will be on tonight. And what was your experience with them? Because that's just a clip.

BOLLING: A couple very upbeat guys. Remember, they got halfway through the series, and then it was yanked.

Now, HGTV knew about where they stood on things like gay marriage and things like that prior to the series. So whatever they did, HGTV pulled that series happened after they had started, and it was in definite response.

Now, these guys are very nice, and they -- you know, it's an interesting interview. But I don't know. If they really -- HGTV really won't -- they won't exactly explain why, but why did they pull it afterwards if they knew in advance?

GUILFOYLE: Because of public outrage.

BOLLING: Well, because of gay activism. Is gay activism so strong now, has it gone from, like, an equality encompassing agenda to, you know, boycotts and pulling...?

GUILFOYLE: Bob, you have a problem with this?

BECKEL: I'd say I watch HGTV every night. I've never heard of HGTV. Home and Garden?

BOLLING: It's big, Bob.

BECKEL: It's big? Oh, I'm glad to hear it. So are cooking shows and all this stuff. I just don't watch them.

But when the guy said -- the one comment that got me was demonic forces are taking over our universities and public schools, who is he kidding? What is a demonic force?

BOLLING: Bob, my "One More Thing" yesterday, the satanic black mass at Harvard that's going to happen on Monday.

BECKEL: That's at Harvard.

BOLLING: That's one instance.

BECKEL: You think they're taking over the public schools?

WATTERS: Here's the thing, Bob. Listen, the audience at HGTV, it's a lot of gays and a lot of women. And it was a business decision. They were, you know, going to get boycotted potentially, and it was going to be offensive to the audience.

But I think now businessmen in America, they have to make a decision: Am I going to be a businessman first or am I going to be an outspoken Christian? What's more important? Do I want to make money or do I want to proselytize. And the way these...

BECKEL: Do these guys make these comments during their shows?

BOLLING: Prior.

PERINO: Years ago.

GUILFOYLE: No, Bob. This -- the clip were talking about was 2012. So we're saying this is what they said in the past. These are the beliefs that they hold.

But they also said on the show, the other clips we're showing here, that they're traditional, that they're, you know, family men, so I think they were very much in keeping in touch with what their personas were. But when this was highlighted, they had to pull it.

BECKEL: Well, if they weren't going to say it -- they weren't going to say it on the show, what's the big deal?

GUILFOYLE: Because they said it in the past, and it became an issue. Jesse just explained that.

WATTERS: Right. You have left-wing people trying to get scalps out there. They want to take down Christians, and they want to silence them. And when you say these things, some of them are pretty controversial. I mean, you didn't play the whole clip...

GUILFOYLE: You might have offended the, you know, American Indians. You should watch (ph) that.

WATTERS: I'm sorry. I'm sorry.

But you're trying to -- you're handing these guys, your opponents a loaded gun when you say things these things. It wasn't just demonic. They made a Nazi comparison. The gates of Hell. The enemies. It's explosive stuff. They've just got to polish it up, because you can't say this stuff anymore.

GUILFOYLE: Dana.

PERINO: Well, I think on the bigger picture, it's a march from the left to shut down the free expression of anybody who they disagree with. I might disagree with that as well, but guess what? This is what I do. I don't watch it.

There's a Web site, the Daily Mail Web site, it's a great place. People love to go to that Web site. You can find a lot of stories on there. It is so disturbing to me. If I ever find myself looking at some of the stories and digging deeper and going farther. It's just so debasing. I have to turn it off, and I walk away. So I don't watch it. Same thing with "Sister Wives." I don't watch "Sister Wives," because I don't want to talk about polygamy.

BECKEL: Do they grow -- do they grow vegetables that are demonic?

PERINO: No.

BECKEL: Are you talking about this? You're not...

PERINO: I'm talking about a bigger picture thing.

BECKEL: I'm sorry. I thought you were talking about Home or Garden....

PERINO: No, I mean the whole left, Bob. I'm talking about the whole left.

GUILFOYLE: Do the producers have something for Bob today?

BECKEL: No. It's home and -- what? I'm sorry.

GUILFOYLE: All right. Never mind. Let's -- moving on. Yes. Make sure to catch "The O'Reilly Factor" tonight for Eric's full interview with the Benham brothers. This is going to answer all your questions. That's 8 p.m. Eastern, so don't miss it. It's going to be fantastic.

And up next, the secrets to a lasting marriage? Are you kidding me? Is this a joke? From none other than bachelor Bob. Oh, yes. Give me the advice I need. He's got some important tips for all those couples out there, so stay tuned.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

BECKEL: Well, I was married once. It didn't last long, but I got two great kids out of it. But if I'd known this, it might have.

According to a new report, couples who equally share their chores around the house...

GUILFOYLE: This is so funny.

BECKEL: ... are more likely to stay together than those who don't. Apparently, when one person is doing more of the work, resentment sets in. Well, my old lady used to nag me about that all the time.

BOLLING: "My old lady." Maybe that's part of the problem.

GUILFOYLE: Right.

BECKEL: You find -- you find this to be a true statement. Dana, you were one who -- I mean, I know -- I've been to your home. I know your husband is a wonderful guy. I know two instances that -- where you've been particularly uncomfortable. One was a purple glove...

PERINO: Yes.

BECKEL: ... that was there for three days and you went ballistic over it, and then he didn't hang...

PERINO: I didn't go ballistic. I kept very calm. But I was irritated.

BECKEL: But you kept going -- what you did was you went...

WATTERS: It was your husband's purple glove?

PERINO: No, it was a cleaning lady's purple glove. She left it on accident on the nightstand, and he left it there for, like, three days. And I was like, "Surely, he's going to pick that up. Surely, he's going to pick it up." Finally, on the third day, I put it, you know, where he couldn't help but miss it. And I mentioned it on the show.

Which is also how I got the poster of Jasper finally hung up in the kitchen, because I was complaining.

BECKEL: But see, this is the problem. Women, when they keep coming at you.

PERINO: That was six months.

BECKEL: Yes, but they keep coming at you. They nag and nag and nag. There's a certain resentment that sets in, that says, "The hell with that."

PERINO: What about my resentment to having a poster available for six months and not hung up?

BECKEL: Well, you're right. OK.

GUILFOYLE: Why don't you just do what you're asked the first time, so you don't...

BECKEL: Why?

GUILFOYLE: ... wear us out by being so super annoying and lagging and not getting your stuff done?

BECKEL: Did you nag -- well, you've been divorced five times, so did you nag...

GUILFOYLE: I so have not been divorced five times.

BECKEL: Did you used to nag your husbands?

GUILFOYLE: I don't know, maybe. You know what? They nagged me, too, and bothered me, so there you go.

BECKEL: Jesse -- Jesse said to me on the break, "Don't mention this, because if I have to say in on the air, I'm in real trouble," but his wife nags him all the time.

WATTERS: No, wait a second. I did not say that.

PERINO: No, he said probably because he doesn't do his chores.

WATTERS: That's more of what I said. But that doesn't sound good, OK?

GUILFOYLE: Now you're in trouble.

WATTERS: Now I'm really in trouble.

GUILFOYLE: You got Beckeled, because you can't tell Bob, and then he says it.

WATTERS: I had to call my wife when I saw this was going to be the segment and say, "Honey, I'm afraid I'm going to say something sexist. What are my chores? I make the bed, right? I vacuum."

And she says, "Jesse..."

BECKEL: You make the bed and you vacuum?

WATTERS: .".. it's not a chore if you make the bed once a month." So apparently, my only chores that I do regularly are feed the cats and take out the trash.

PERINO: Take out the trash is excellent.

BECKEL: Let's talk to the wuss man himself here.

BOLLING: I'm going to be very guilty of being a wussy right now.

BECKEL: You are, because I'm sure you do whatever your old lady says to do, right?

BOLLING: You know what? I pretty much do. I think Kimberly's right. The way -- you know, keep it cool at home. So if she asks you to change some light bulbs or do -- you just do it.

GUILFOYLE: Why wouldn't you do it?

BOLLING: Do it. It's just easier.

BECKEL: It's OK to do it. They start working on it in the morning, and it goes all day long. Or how's this? You get something and you think you've got it resolved. Six months later at the dinner table she says, "What is this about that thing?"

PERINO: Why didn't you hang up that poster of Jasper that I asked you to hang up?

GUILFOYLE: Can you imagine Bob's poor wife? The poor...

BECKEL: She's a very nice woman.

PERINO: But Bob, what -- I would love to know. What chores did you have?

GUILFOYLE: He didn't do anything.

BECKEL: I had plenty of chores.

PERINO: Like what?

BECKEL: I had to move books around.

PERINO: That's not a chore.

BECKEL: I had to do -- take my...

PERINO: A chore is something you have to do regularly.

BECKEL: One thing I did find out...

WATTERS: Get a housekeeper. You have enough money. Just hire the housekeeper.

BECKEL: I did. But listen, you know one thing about this...

GUILFOYLE: He needs one at his place now, let me tell you.

BECKEL: Men do male-oriented things like do the yard work and change the oil, and women do stuff in the house. Men get more sex that way.

WATTERS: I'm going to go home and mow the lawn now.

GUILFOYLE: That was the only part of the study that he paid attention to.

BECKEL: If I were you, after four months, it's time for you. OK?

GUILFOYLE: That's why you've got to do a "honey do" list. Honey do this. Honey do this and that. And it's very sweet.

BECKEL: Yes, but that's the thing...

GUILFOYLE: No. Bob, when there's a big reward at the end, they like it.

BECKEL: Yes. Well, if it's clear that's the reward, but usually it's more nagging and frankly -- but as I said, I got two great kids out of it, and my ex-wife is a nice lady. And she had to live with me, and I've got to give her that.

Coming up, round one of the NFL draft was definitely a nail biter for one start college quarterback. Heisman Trophy winner Johnny Football had to wait a long wait last night, but did his wait pay off?

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

WATTERS; Two-time All American and Heisman Trophy winner, Johnny Football, a.k.a. Johnny Manziel waited longer than expected at last night's NFL draft to hear his name called.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: With the first pick in the 2014 NFL draft, the Houston Texans select Jadeveon Clowney.

The third pick in the 2014 NFL draft, the Jacksonville Jaguars select Blake Bortles.

The 15th pick in the 2014 NFL draft, the Dallas Cowboys select Zach Martin, guard, Notre Dame.

With the 22nd pick in the 2014 NFL draft, the Cleveland Browns select Johnny Manziel, quarterback, Texas A&M.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

WATTERS: While the media mused on how Johnny would react, the star QB didn't seem to be taking it too hard. Here he is hitting a club in New York City last night, where he reportedly sprayed champagne until 5 a.m.

GUILFOYLE: Is that a FOX News alert?

WATTERS: Just like Bob.

BECKEL: Yes, in New York.

WATTERS: Let's go to Bolling on this. You know the knocks on this guy: He's under size. You know, he has this backyard style of play. He had some off the field incidents. But he had a great Pro Day.

PERINO: Are you talking about Greg Gutfeld?

WATTERS: No.

GUILFOYLE: Undersized, yes.

WATTERS: I mean, he had a great career in college. Do you feel bad for him?

BOLLING: No. But here's what I think went on. So a lot of teams waited. They said, you know, they passed on Johnny Manziel for a lot of reasons, other than his -- he's only five -- he's under six feet, which would be very short for an NFL quarterback. Not because of that. He wins games. He's proven that his height isn't going to keep him from winning games.

I think they did because of all the antics. He plays a lot of -- I happen to like him. I like what he does. He just does it. Remember, he had that whole "I'm going to sign autographs for money. I don't care."

WATTERS: Right.

BOLLING: And he got selected and he did this with the money thing. So he's very in your face. And I think a lot of teams didn't want that distraction right now. That's why they passed.

But I think Cleveland got a good quarterback for a 22nd pick, draft.

WATTERS: Right. Now, we got a scouting report here from the New England Patriots, hot off the presses. And you look at the background they did on this guy. This is what they said about him: "Spoiled brat" because his dad bought him a luxury car. Quote, "Outlaw blood lines." OK? And then my favorite, "High knotted calves with pretty good thickness in the thighs and bubble."

BOLLING: Of course that's your favorite.

WATTERS: I don't know that that means.

PERINO: I would be devastated if somebody wrote that about me.

BECKEL: Right. A, I don't think he's that good of a quarterback. He's too short. He did not play an NFL-style offense. He played at Texas A&M. Have you seen their schedule?

GUILFOYLE: Well, that's what they think, backyard football.

BECKEL: It ain't that big except for Texas, and he got beat by Texas.

WATTERS: I mean, they played Alabama. They played LSU.

BECKEL: Yes, and they got beat.

WATTERS: Yes, but he rips them up.

BOLLING: It's a top-notch football program. He was a star quarterback. He broke records across the...

GUILFOYLE: The point is ...

BECKEL: Can I make one other point?

GUILFOYLE: Ay, yi, yi.

BECKEL: I'm sorry. Most of the top ten picks were mostly defensive, and a lot of these teams are looking for defensive help and that's one of the reasons quarterbacks fell down.

WATTERS: Kimberly, what do you think?

GUILFOYLE: It's not over for him. Let's see what he does with it. Eric doesn't like it. We had a little back and forth, because he's going to Cleveland. He like, "Oh, it's not a good team. It's not a good quarterback history if you play there."

And I was like, "Kosar to Slaughter," and then he accused me of being fed that information.

BOLLING: I don't know this.

GUILFOYLE: Yes, a 19 win. Ninety-one.

WATTERS: And this guy is running around with all these hot girlfriends. He's hanging out with Drake, with George H.W. Bush.

PERINO: What a loser. I mean, that's the thing. I don't understand.

I think that I would recommend putting the players off to the side in a room where you can't see them so that you don't have the attempts to humiliate somebody while they're sitting there waiting to see if they'll get picked.

GUILFOYLE: Right.

BECKEL: He's the only guy that Dana would be about the same size as.

GUILFOYLE: Oh, my gosh.

PERINO: I did feel like -- I felt bad for him. I was thinking of the movie "Bridesmaids."

WATTERS: That's right.

PERINO: Like he's always going to be the bridesmaid.

WATTERS: That's right. Yes. Like a lady quince (ph).

GUILFOYLE: Let's see what he does.

WATTERS: All right. "One More Thing" is up next.

GUILFOYLE: There you go.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

BOLLING: All righty. Time for "One More Thing." K.G., you have a special one.

GUILFOYLE: Yes, we want to wish a very special happy birthday to our very own Dana Perino.

PERINO: Thank you. How much we love you. Thank you.

GUILFOYLE: She's getting younger and more beautiful looking every year.

PERINO: Do you know that this is our third birthday of mine that we've spent together?

GUILFOYLE: Isn't that sweet?

PERINO: Isn't that interesting?

GUILFOYLE: Seems like an anniversary birthday.

BECKEL: You know, we would have sang "Happy Birthday" to you, but they've got some ridiculous thing on it.

GUILFOYLE: We're going to cut the cake.

BOLLING: There's a copyright on it. We're not allowed -- we're not allowed to sing "Happy Birthday."

BECKEL: Well, the copyright is full of...

BOLLING: We would love to sing "Happy Birthday."

PERINO: Yes, well you know what? It's the thought that counts.

WATTERS: Thank you.

PERINO: And I will just internalize that you sang "Happy Birthday."

BECKEL: I'm singing it right now in my head.

PERINO: Bob got me flowers today. Did anybody put you up to that, Bob?

BECKEL: No, I did it myself.

GUILFOYLE: I caught it. Bob demanded that I cut him a big piece.

BECKEL: Thank you.

BOLLING: They're telling me to move on, so Dana, your "One More Thing."

PERINO: OK. I just have a "One More Thing." I liked this in "The Wall Street Journal" today. They had the best selling products of all time. At the top 10, PlayStation. The second one is Lipitor, which I think is hilarious. Then the Corolla, "Star Wars," iPad. Understand that. Mario Brothers franchise, Michael Jackson's "Thriller," Harry Potter, the iPhone, and No. 10, the Rubik's Cube.

BOLLING: Very good. Very cool.

PERINO: Did you like that? I thought you would like that.

BECKEL: The Rubik's Cube. Really?

PERINO: Yes.

GUILFOYLE: You only want a small piece?

PERINO: Yes, I'll take that one.

BOLLING: There we go. I'm up next. Don't forget to watch "The O'Reilly Factor" tonight. We have those two brothers, Jason and David Benham, the guys who were fired from HGTV for their -- their stance on traditional values like...

BECKEL: Who's hosting tonight?

BOLLING: Some guy named Eric Bolling.

BECKEL: Oh, I see.

BOLLING: So it will be good. And "Cashin' In" tomorrow morning, 11:30. Don't forget. Also going to be a good one.

Bob, if you can take a second from eating. Can you?

BECKEL: My "One More Thing"?

GUILFOYLE: Oh, my God.

BECKEL: Twenty years ago today, one of the great events in history happened. Nelson Mandela, who had just gotten out of jail, was elected president of South Africa. And one of the -- I think really the great titans of the last hundred years, and he's now passed on but what a great, great, great event that was.

BOLLING: Very good. Very good. Well-done, Bob. Jesse, you're bringing up the rear.

WATTERS: OK. My "One More Thing." I don't know what that means.

BOLLING: So to speak.

BECKEL: Apologize to your wife.

GUILFOYLE: Thanks to Bob.

WATTERS: OK, so I was looking on my favorite Web site the other day, Bar Stool Sports. Came across a great video. It involves dogs. So I think Dana is really going to like this one.

There's a black bear coming up to this house in New Hampshire, OK. Walking around, all right. So we've got some people that need to protect the house.

PERINO: Wow.

WATTERS: Two bulldogs corner, confront the black bear.

BOLLING: That's awesome.

WATTERS: Who do you think wins?

PERINO: Dogs.

BOLLING: Always the doggies.

WATTERS: Dogs.

BOLLING: Good boys! Good boys!

WATTERS: The dogs always win. There you go.

BOLLING: And can I point out the piece of cake that Kimberly cut me - - can you look at this piece of cake?

GUILFOYLE: I know you're worried. You see the big, thick one I gave to Bob?

BOLLING: What's up with that, K.G.?

PERINO: I like it. I appreciate that.

GUILFOYLE: You said you wanted a little piece.

BOLLING: Quick thought. Quick thought around the table. Mother's Day. Happy Mother's Day this weekend. Right?

Happy Mother's Day to you.

GUILFOYLE: Happy Mother's Day to...

PERINO: Happy Mother's Day to you. And also, our colleague, Greg Gutfeld, who's not here today because he went to see his mom.

Hello, Jackie, if you're watching.

GUILFOYLE: Happy Mother's Day.

BECKEL: My mother has passed away. But the mother of my children is a wonderful person and happy Mother's Day to you.

BOLLING: And happy Mother's Day you, the mother of Jasper, who is very proud of you.

BOLLING : Does that count?

BOLLING: Of course it counts.

PERINO: Does it count if you're the mother of a dog?

WATTERS: We'll let it count.

GUILFOYLE: And to the moms that aren't here. Your mom and my mom and we want to say...

PERINO: And my mom.

GUILFOYLE: ... happy Mother's Day to Andrea's mom.

WATTERS: And my mom.

BOLLING: Say good-night.

WATTERS: ... Watters.

PERINO: Everybody's mom.

BOLLING: See, it's one big, happy family.

PERINO: Even Bill O'Reilly's.

BOLLING: Don't forget to set your DVRs. We've got to go. See you Monday.

Content and Programming Copyright 2014 Fox News Network, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Copyright 2014 CQ-Roll Call, Inc. All materials herein are protected by United States copyright law and may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, displayed, published or broadcast without the prior written permission of CQ-Roll Call. You may not alter or remove any trademark, copyright or other notice from copies of the content.ERIC BOLLING, CO-HOST: Hello, everyone. I'm Eric Bolling, along with Kimberly Guilfoyle, Bob Beckel, Dana Perino, and Jesse Watters.

It's 5 o'clock in New York City, and this is "The Five."

(MUSIC)

BOLLING: So, does #diplomacy work? Three hundred girls were kidnapped in Nigeria by the Muslim terror group Boko Haram. It caused outrage around the world. Celebrities like Ellen DeGeneres and P. Diddy have taken to Twitter with a #bringbackourgirls. Now, members of the political class like Michelle Obama and Senator Dick Durbin are entering the fray.

Is #activism a fad or is this actually becoming a part of American foreign policy? Rush Limbaugh thinks for one it's a joke.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

RUSH LIMBAUGH, RADIO HOST: I think this is pathetic. I'm just stunned. We've got 300 Nigerian girls kidnapped by an al Qaeda group. And nobody cared to talk about it for a while. Hillary wouldn't call them a terror group. Now, all of a sudden, for some reason, we're on a big push to get them back and this is how -- the sad thing here is that the low- information crowd that's puddling around out there on Twitter is going to think we're actually doing something about it. It is just unbelievable. Bring back our girls. They are Nigerian.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

BOLLING: K.G., Rush goes on to say are we this powerless that that's all we got is a hashtag?

KIMBERLY GUILFOYLE, CO-HOST: Yes. I mean, it is sad. It's a hashtag. They're holding up a sign. I understand their hearts are in the right, you know, place. But I would like to see some movement, some action, some leadership in a real significant way, meaning results- oriented.

Doesn't everybody want that and shouldn't have matter about the young Nigerian boys that were murdered as well? So, listen, I hope they come home. I hope they rescue them. That's what's forefront in my mind.

BOLLING: All right. Big boy, you got a dilemma here, my man. You're anti war. You said you were an anti war activist? Now, what do you do -- do you send American -- do you put Americans lives at risk --

BOB BECKEL, CO-HOST: Well, first, I think it's a little premature to say that we're not doing anything. We've sent military people over there.

(CROSSTALK)

BECKEL: Well, wait a minute, you don't know everything that's going on. Something like this, there's a lot of stuff going on behind the scenes and the public doesn't know about. My guess is there's a lot of Americans, a lot of intel going over there and it's a lot more than a hashtag.

I'm a little surprised by old Rush, which, by the way, using Rush is such an unusual thing for the show. But the -- he said it's Nigerian girls. What does he mean by that?

BOLLING: I'm not sure. I'm not going to put words in Rush's mouth.

JESSE WATTERS, CO-HOST: I think he means they are not American girls.

DANA PERINO, CO-HOST: So, the question is the hashtag is #bringbackourgirls. He's being specific to our -- meaning our --

(CROSSTALK)

PERINO: But I think that is actually just a hashtag that started actually in Nigeria. It didn't start here.

BOLLING: Dana, John McCain said we should mobilize our assets. He even suggested using our drone capabilities. Your thoughts on that?

PERINO: So, if we had the intel and we could have a strike that where you could take out the terrorists and protect innocent life, then, yes, of course. That is exactly what that kind of technology should be used for.

You know, how this -- the hashtag thing if nothing else is being done, then I agree that it is ridiculous. However, there are ways to mobilize things. Sometimes, it takes a little bit of time, but I was thinking about the One Campaign and global anti-poverty efforts have started like early 2001, 2002, 2003 and everybody wore those little bracelets, and it wasn't because we thought that the bracelet was actually going to do anything but it was part of a solidarity with a movement to move forward.

And if you think of the Green Revolution in Iran, remember, that was really fueled by Twitter. And one of the criticisms of President Obama and the administration was that they did not do enough to try to capitalize on the social media spreading of that message. So, by itself, does the hashtag do anything? Absolutely not. Does it make you look cool if you're a part of the #bringbackourgirls thing? Yes.

What they should have done is why not -- if you really want to not make it partisan, find somebody else from across the aisle or get a lot of women together from Republicans and Democrats, and whoever else, and do it altogether. Instead, it's a thing that's being mocked from the right to the left, and vice versa, left to right.

BOLLING: Jesse, what about the celebs, the Hollywood elites now jumping on the bandwagon? Is that bandwagon activism? And if it is, maybe we want that.

WATTERS: I mean, I think they are taking their cues from Michelle Obama obviously. Kim Kardashian, all of a sudden, she starts tweeting about this. You kind feel like --

BECKEL: She doesn't know where Nigeria is.

(CROSSTALK)

WATTERS: Of course not.

Anything that makes these celebrities feel good, it makes them feel connected. It makes them feel emphatic. But they don't know the difference between Nigeria and Angola.

But if Michelle Obama have gone up and said #whatabouttheSyriangirls? They would have done the same thing. I think it's selective outrage.

BOLLING: Do we risk American lives to save these Nigerian women?

WATTERS: I mean, logistically, they have 300 girls captive. If you go in, they're just going to start slaughtering them. So, I don't know if it makes a ton of sense. But like you said, they're going to get intel in these guys, and in a few weeks, we're going to send a drone to northern Nigeria and just zap these guys.

BOLLING: We're going to drone their butts.

All right. Let's move on --

(CROSSTALK)

PERINO: One other thing -- in 2005, a point in our history that doesn't get as much attention as it probably deserves, 2005, about 200 marines were sent to Liberia and they liberated that country from a dictator, 200 marines. I don't believe there was any loss of life from our side.

So, with intel and our capabilities and technology, you can actually -- if you decide it's in your national interests, you can do more.

BECKEL: I know you want to move on, but just very quickly, the Arab Spring literally was directed by Twitter.

BOLLING: It was certainly organized. It certainly organized --

GUILFOYLE: Dana, just a quick follow-up for your statement? What do you think? Do you feel that this is something that can make a legitimate case that it is in our national interests?

PERINO: The girls in Nigeria?

GUILFOYLE: Yes.

PERINO: I think so. I could be persuaded, but I actually would say that's true in Syria as well, because I think when you have 8,000 children killed by chemical weapons -- some by chemical weapon in Syria, then, yes, I think we should have done something there, too.

GUILFOYLE: There as well.

BOLLING: I have to move on the next one. On Benghazi today, Democrats still haven't decided whether they'll participate in a new investigation into the deadly attack on our consulate. Nancy Pelosi and her liberal colleagues don't seem to think Americans deserve answers.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

REP. NANCY PELOSI (D-CA), MINORITY LEADER: This is a stunt. This is a political stunt. Either people have gotten tired of Benghazi, but they never knew about it in the first place. So, let's not be accomplices to this diversionary tactic.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

BOLLING: Well, Democrats have been accusing Republicans of trying to fundraise off Benghazi. Tom Cotton, an Army vet, took to the House floor today to expose their hypocrisy.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

REP. TOM COTTON (R), ARKANSAS: When I was leading troops in Iraq in 2006, men and women were being shot at and blown at by al Qaeda, where was the outrage, as they fundraise endlessly off the Iraq war? Where was the outrage as they viciously attacked our commanders? Where was the outrage when they said that soldiers were war criminals?

(END VIDEO CLIP)

BOLLING: What about it, Bob?

BECKEL: Well, some of those comments that were made obviously way out of place, but let's keep in mind the difference between Iraq and what's going on in Benghazi, there were 6,500 Americans killed in Iraq and 32,000 injured badly. And so, I think it's a little different when you are talking about trying to stop a war at that size and you are talking about Benghazi. I don't think it's equivalent.

BOLLING: It's different?

WATTERS: The one thing, I think it's not just that they were fundraising off Iraq, they're fundraising school shootings, Sandy Hook, Columbine, and then to all of a sudden say, you are not able to fund raise off Benghazi, which is a legitimate scandal, is really hypocritical. Both sides do it. It does look sleazy. You raised money after 9/11, you raised money after Katrina.

These things happen in politics but it's a little hypocritical for the left to go after the Republicans. I think the Republicans stuck to their guns, they're not going to cave on this. I think the left thought that the media was going to echo this sentiment and they didn't. So, I think they're going to --

BECKEL: Yes, the same congressman said that Republicans shouldn't be raising money on Benghazi and they are.

BOLLING: No, no, I'm not sure he said that. I'm saying --

BECKEL: Yes, he did.

BOLLING: OK. But let me put this way. I don't think it's consistent across all Republicans. Some say they won't raise money off Benghazi and some say they will.

And let me frame this properly -- what they say raise money off of Benghazi, that sounds terrible. What they mean is they're going to run and say, I'm a Republican, I want more answers into what happened in Benghazi. So, therefore, you should elect more people like me versus a Democrat who doesn't even want answers in Benghazi.

GUILFOYLE: That's how you frame it? Is that not OK to do? Because maybe there are Americans out there I want to vote for a candidate who is actually interested in getting to the bottom of investigations and not saying it's just politics and actually want to hold an administration accountable? The problem is transparency. It sounds good to me.

BOLLING: Dana, should Republicans shy away from raising money in something as important as Benghazi?

PERINO: Not my style. I like how you frame it. I can understand that in terms of judgment and character, you should want more people like me in Washington compared to people like this who call getting to the bottom of something a stunt. I actually understand that.

Now, there is a select committee and Trey Gowdy is in the chair position. Because he is so credible and he is well-respected on both sides, I think that everybody else, at least on the political side of things, just follow his lead. And if I were there, I would say, Trey Gowdy and his spokesperson are the only two people that are speaking on this. And if they ask questions without speechifying, no theatrics.

Remember, Bob, the whole like watermelon and the gun thing during the Vince Foster situation, that was a stunt and the theatrical event that didn't help on the PR side. I don't think they need to.

One other thing just -- when they -- when Democrats say, "This is a stunt, don't pay attention," that is a message aimed directly to the left and to the media, to other media to say, don't bother covering this, but I would like to propose something. I would love -- I would help organize a debate between someone like Steve Hayes and pick anybody from the mainstream media that was supposed to be covering Benghazi, one neutral moderator and let them see -- let the American people decide if this is just a stunt or a legitimate investigation.

BOLLING: Hang on, Jesse. I know you want to jump in. Just do me a favor. One quick time around, because we have another topic. Should the Democrats show up, yes or no?

WATTERS: I would say, yes, they should if they don't -- look, there's going to be seven Republicans kicking Hillary Clinton's butt out there. If they're not there to change the narrative and give her a little break during the hearing, then they're going to get screwed.

PERINO: Agreed. And so, they don't know what else is out there. That document that surprised everybody last week that was withheld by the administration, where there is one document, there's probably more.

BOLLING: Bob, should they show up?

BECKEL: Absolutely not. There's only two questions left? Where did the video come from? And who did the stand-down? That's it, period.

(CROSSTALK)

WATTERS: And why wasn't there security at the embassy?

BOLLING: And, K.G., should they show up? Maybe to get those answers.

GUILFOYLE: Absolutely. You've got to show up. You have all the facts, all the information. Otherwise, how can you say you're a credible candidate if you're not willing to go in there and answer questions and participate?

BECKEL: Because it's a campaign rally for Republicans.

GUILFOYLE: Well, that's your case.

BOLLING: Let's do this one -- from Boko Haram to Benghazi, to Beverly Hills, where protests are growing wider over the sultan of Brunei's Sharia law. Celebrities and others are boycotting the sultan's famed Beverly Hills Hotel, along with the Hotel Bel-Air after he imposed the harsh Islamic law in his country.

Jesse, why don't you take this one, first?

WATTERS: It's funny to me how the left is all of a sudden realizing that fanatical Muslims hate homosexuals and hate women.

PERINO: Yes.

WATTERS: And it's a little hypocritical for Hollywood who perpetuates violence against women in all their movies. Ands they're all of a sudden outrage that women are mistreated.

And speaking of this, the homosexual situation, there's a gay teen pedophile ring going around right now in Hollywood and they're circling the wagons around these people out there. But all of a sudden, everyone is outrage. I mean, Muslims (INAUDIBLE) people all of the time all over the world, but if you're going to stone a Muslim who happens to be gay, then Hollywood gets upset? It's crazy.

BOLLING: But it's OK. Look, that's American protest right there, right? Free market?

PERINO: I don't understand. I agree with Jesse, like now the complaint is that they don't want to go to this hotel anymore? I mean, there are plenty of places in Hollywood where you can pay $22 for a martini that they are not looking for opportunity in that regard.

BOLLING: It's famed. It's got history, Bob. Have you been to Beverly Hills Hotel?

BECKEL: Yes, I had, but I didn't know it was owned by Brunei.

Listen, I would find every single economic investment that Brunei has got and I would boycott it. I would take anybody, any country that has Sharia law and I would stop doing economic trade with them, including the Saudis, I might add. We've just allowed this -- Sharia law is -- it is the most amazing human rights violator on anything that's ever been known in the face of this earth. And therefore, you reward by taking everything away from them.

BOLLING: It's so difficult, K.G. The global economy so intertwined. There's no way of -- there's no way of calling out everything they own.

GUILFOYLE: No, but if you are made aware of it and you find out, there's plenty of great hotels in Los Angeles, like the Peninsula or Four Seasons. So, I would say there. True.

BOLLING: (INAUDIBLE)

GUILFOYLE: Well, you know, they're not into Sharia law.

BOLLING: We're going to leave -- let's hope they're not into Sharia law.

Next on "The Five," some controversial comments today from Pope Francis regarding world poverty. We'll tell you what he said.

Plus, Mitt Romney breaks from some in his party on the minimum wage. Why he thinks it should be raised, when "The Five" returns.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

PERINO: Pope Francis is asking the world to do more to help people out of poverty and his words today are making some headlines. Earlier, the pontiff called on governments around the globe to redistribute wealth to the poor in a new spirit of generosity. He's urging the United Nations to help get rid of what he calls the economy of inclusion.

So, this has been an issue for a while because I think it's been a year that the pope has been there at the Vatican and he wrote a paper that got a lot of attention and we -- also President Obama is talking a lot about income inequality.

And this question has come up. Eric, we were talking about before, I don't find the pope's comments that controversial because I feel like I can hear what he's trying to say, in terms of the message of what I learned, what we all learned, when you go to Sunday school, and you're taught by your parents what Jesus would have taught.

But this is causing some controversy because the question is, how does the U.N. get involved?

BOLLING: Look, let me clarify this. I love Pope Francis.

PERINO: Oh, I know you do.

BOLLING: I love everything he's doing.

This is controversial because he's asking the government's to redistribute wealth. When the church says the government around the world, you know, take money from your more wealthy, give it to your poor.

It's no surprise. I mean, this is -- Pope Francis has been about the poverty stricken his entire life. That's his -- he's championed that cause straight through.

It just has become controversial. I don't think it's going to change his legacy. I think he's a wonderful pope. I think he's bringing Christians together in a fantastic way.

PERINO: Well, that makes people talk about it.

BOLLING: Right.

PERINO: And I want -- Kevin Williamson who's "National Review" and one of my favorite columnist, he wrote a piece about this a while ago, but it was -- I thought of it today and I want to pull up one sentence. He says, "To give away wealth presumes the existence of that wealth. Giving away all that you own does not do the poor an iota of good if you don't have anything. You can't spread the wealth without wealth. Capitalism is the precondition of generosity. If you want to feed the Lord's sheep, you must begin by planting the fields."

And, Bob, I think that capitalism actually makes people more generous, at least through charitable givings and that's how the church actually is able to further a lot of its message.

BECKEL: Americans have the highest generosity in terms of contributing to charity of any country in the world, but what the pope is saying is right. He's been in a lot of countries where there's a very small percentage of oligarchs and everybody else is poor. We ain't too far away from that.

And he's making the point about minimum wage and redistributing help, good for him. I'm glad he's saying it. Bring it into the forefront, and not just have liberal say it. It is time for us to take people in this country and not have the minimum wage that keeps them in poverty and hungry.

PERINO: Well, Kimberly, actually, if you look around the world, maybe what is more actually needed is more capitalism. I mean, most of the poor living in places where you don't have capitalism and it's socialism or worse.

GUILFOYLE: Yes. Well, without capitalism, how can you have economic growth? How can you have new job development?

That's what I don't understand. They want everything but they don't want to do what it takes to get it. That's like, hey, push that car down the road. I'm sorry, you made me take the wheels off, how am I going to get it there? It doesn't make any sense to me.

Before -- you know, I'm sure people are very excited on the left that the pope said this. Bless them. But, you know, he also was definitely a champion against socialism in Argentina. So, there's a little bit of a dichotomy there.

But nevertheless, I think his heart is in the right place but he is the pope and he is the head of the church. That's why he's not running the government, right? It makes sense.

PERINO: But he does have political influence.

WATTERS: Right. I think the left is using the pope here a little bit. I mean, whenever he says anything about abortion, the left is either silent or they try to marginalize him as some sort of old fashion bigot. But today, if you look at the story, it's on every mainstream Web site. It's on every left wing Web site.

And the minute he says redistribution, they are going to glom on to this and use this to force their socialist agenda. But I do think they may be distorting his words a little bit. I think maybe some of this was lost in translation. There's more of an empathetic play. He's not a socialist. He's not a Marxist.

I may disagree with his objective about how to get there. I think free market capitalism probably is the best way to address poverty. I have deep respect for the pope --

(CROSSTALK)

BECKEL: He's just looking out for the poor. Do you recognize the poor treated badly? Not only in the third world, but in this country as well?

WATTERS: Listen, if the pope is going to go out there and let's say slash taxes, climate change is a hoax, let's deregulate the economy -- I mean, all hell would break loose. Let's be honest. I mean, he knows what he's talking --

(CROSSTALK)

BECKEL: But he won't say it because none of that is right.

PERINO: Well, let's just bring up. Can we do one other topic? Which is that former Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney was on "Morning Joe" this morning. He was talking about minimum wage and he's for it and he's against it. Now, he's for raising it.

Listen.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP

MITT ROMNEY (R), FORMER PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE: I, for instance, as you know, part company with many of the conservatives of my party on the issue of the minimum wage. I think we ought to raise it, because, frankly, our party is all about more jobs and better pay. And I think communicating that is important to us.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

PERINO: OK. So, showing on the right big tent, lots of different philosophies, they don't necessarily walk in lock step. Eric, would you think -- we've talked about this at the state level, minimum wages have been raised. He didn't clarify though.

BOLLING: No, they were asking about a federal -- by the way, if you get a chance, that was one of best interviews I've seen Mitt Romney give. It was --

PERINO: A couple of years too late.

BOLLING: Exactly. It was two years too late, because had Morning Joe and Mika asked the question asked today two years ago, he may have a different outcome in the election. That guy was fantastic.

However, this bothered me. This minimum wage thing bothers me a lot, because he went back to raising a federal minimum wage, instead of letting the states decide on their own, which I believe, you know, in states rights to figure out what their minimum wage should be.

Personally, I think there shouldn't be one at all. But he went there and he said, and I'm trying to figure out what was the purpose of doing that. He's not running for president. He says I'm not running for president. It's not going to help out anyone that he endorses going down the road to say, hey, Mitt Romney thinks raising the minimum wage federally is a good idea.

I didn't understand why he was going there.

PERINO: But, Bob, is he trying to maybe move the party in a direction that he thinks it should go?

BECKEL: Well, maybe. You said a big tent, though. I don't know anybody on that tent on minimum wage who is a Republican besides Romney. I applaud him for that. And --

PERINO: Well, that's untrue. Pawlenty, Santorum, a lot of people are being very specific about that the Republican Party --

BECKEL: I stand corrected.

WATTERS: Even your best friend Bill O'Reilly thinks we should raise the minimum wage.

BECKEL: Well, good for Billy.

PERINO: Your best friend for real.

BECKEL: But the point is, a lot of states are tied to the federal minimum wage, and at $7.25, people cannot get out of poverty and they go to bed hungry at night.

PERINO: But then what about the issue of increased regulations and the other taxes, and just in terms of energy costs? If you're -- we're always going to be chasing, Kimberly --

GUILFOYLE: Right.

PERINO: -- the minimum wage that will never actually solve the problem that Bob talks about.

GUILFOYLE: Yes, that's going to remain perpetually insufficient, right? So, that's the problem. So, you have to think about --

BECKEL: $10.10 is not sufficient. That will work.

(CROSSTALK)

PERINO: For how long, Bob.

BOLLING: Bob, I can stop you.

The CBO has scored it. If you raise the minimum wage to $10.10, you are going to cut out 500,000 jobs in America. You're going to --

(CRROSSTALK)

GUILFOYLE: Eliminate.

BOLLING: -- five hundred thousand people to the unemployment. Is that what you want?

BECKEL: They also said that 2 million people will be risen out of poverty.

(CROSSTALK)

BOLLING: So the five people in a room, four is going to get a raise and one is going to get fired. That's a program you want.

BECKEL: I want people to be out of poverty in this country and that minimum wage keeps them in poverty.

BOLLING: I've got news for you, 500,000 people will be poverty --

BECKEL: Maybe.

PERINO: Not only that, but this week, Jesse, there was a report that showed that entrepreneurial spirit of America has just been constantly declining with less people trying to create more businesses, and I can understand the goal of wanting to get people out of poverty but not at the expense, if you can't --

GUILFOYLE: Of job creation.

PERINO: -- if nobody has, nobody is creating jobs, then what have we solved?

WATTERS: Right. You know, the whole minimum wage thing, just like the income inequality thing, it's a dodge. The policies have failed. They haven't created more good paying jobs. So, they try to nickel and dime this stuff on the fringes to drum up the base and stuff like that. And the media goes along with it and people follow along with that. It doesn't create growth and jobs.

(CROSSTALK)

BECKEL: Every state that has raised the minimum wage about $10 has not lost a single job.

WATTERS: And it only affects like a couple of hundred thousand people. This is not something that's going to like lift the whole country out of poverty.

BOLLING: It's 1.6 million people on minimum wage right now in America, but you are going to lose 500,000 of them.

BECKEL: Maybe you'll lose them.

GUILFOYLE: Listen to what he's saying, Bob.

PERINO: I also love how the liberals who hated Mitt Romney so much because of his policies -- what they said that he was only for the rich people, now they love him.

WATTERS: Right.

PERINO: I mean --

(CROSSTALK)

BECKEL: Republicans said you should elect them because he understands business and he understands how (INAUDIBLE). There you got your business guy telling you ought to raise the minimum wage.

PERINO: No, but we voted for him.

GUILFOYLE: What part of the scorecard don't you get?

PERINO: All right. We're going to move on. Ahead, two Christian brothers lose their show on HGTV. Did their faith cause them their jobs? They think so. And that's up next.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

GUILFOYLE: Well, are Christians who hold -- Bob, you with me? -- who hold traditional beliefs welcome to work at HGTV? Well, it doesn't appear that way after twin brothers Jason and David Benham's new show on the network was abruptly canceled this week. Now, they were supposed to star in a reality show called "Flip it Forward," but HGTV yanked the series after some people were upset about their traditional views on marriage, abortion, and more. Now, HGTV was apparently offended by these remarks. (BEGIN VIDEO CLIP) DAVID BENHAM, SHOW CANCELED BY HGTV (via phone): If 87 percent of Americans are Christians, and yet we have abortion on demand, we have no fault divorce, we have pornography and perversion, we have homosexuality an agenda that's attacking the nation, we have adultery, we have all of the things -- I mean, we even have allowed demonic ideologies to take our universities, our public school systems, while the church sits silent and just builds big churches. (END VIDEO CLIP) GUILFOYLE: Now, the Benham brothers are standing by their faith and their values. Now Eric interviewed them for "The O'Reilly Factor" tonight, and here's a sneak peek. (BEGIN VIDEO CLIP) D. BENHAM: The agenda that we're dealing with in America right now is an environment whereby it seeks to silence those that disagree with it, and it begins with Christians. When HGTV released us, it saddened us. It was actually sad for the executives that had us on the call. But our response to them was, "Hey, thanks for the opportunity, and good luck." (END VIDEO CLIP) GUILFOYLE: Eric, congratulations. You got that interview. It will be on tonight. And what was your experience with them? Because that's just a clip. BOLLING: A couple very upbeat guys. Remember, they got halfway through the series, and then it was yanked. Now, HGTV knew about where they stood on things like gay marriage and things like that prior to the series. So whatever they did, HGTV pulled that series happened after they had started, and it was in definite response. Now, these guys are very nice, and they -- you know, it's an interesting interview. But I don't know. If they really -- HGTV really won't -- they won't exactly explain why, but why did they pull it afterwards if they knew in advance? GUILFOYLE: Because of public outrage. BOLLING: Well, because of gay activism. Is gay activism so strong now, has it gone from, like, an equality encompassing agenda to, you know, boycotts and pulling...? GUILFOYLE: Bob, you have a problem with this? BECKEL: I'd say I watch HGTV every night. I've never heard of HGTV. Home and Garden? BOLLING: It's big, Bob. BECKEL: It's big? Oh, I'm glad to hear it. So are cooking shows and all this stuff. I just don't watch them. But when the guy said -- the one comment that got me was demonic forces are taking over our universities and public schools, who is he kidding? What is a demonic force? BOLLING: Bob, my "One More Thing" yesterday, the satanic black mass at Harvard that's going to happen on Monday. BECKEL: That's at Harvard. BOLLING: That's one instance. BECKEL: You think they're taking over the public schools? WATTERS: Here's the thing, Bob. Listen, the audience at HGTV, it's a lot of gays and a lot of women. And it was a business decision. They were, you know, going to get boycotted potentially, and it was going to be offensive to the audience. But I think now businessmen in America, they have to make a decision: Am I going to be a businessman first or am I going to be an outspoken Christian? What's more important? Do I want to make money or do I want to proselytize. And the way these... BECKEL: Do these guys make these comments during their shows? BOLLING: Prior. PERINO: Years ago. GUILFOYLE: No, Bob. This -- the clip were talking about was 2012. So we're saying this is what they said in the past. These are the beliefs that they hold. But they also said on the show, the other clips we're showing here, that they're traditional, that they're, you know, family men, so I think they were very much in keeping in touch with what their personas were. But when this was highlighted, they had to pull it. BECKEL: Well, if they weren't going to say it -- they weren't going to say it on the show, what's the big deal? GUILFOYLE: Because they said it in the past, and it became an issue. Jesse just explained that. WATTERS: Right. You have left-wing people trying to get scalps out there. They want to take down Christians, and they want to silence them. And when you say these things, some of them are pretty controversial. I mean, you didn't play the whole clip... GUILFOYLE: You might have offended the, you know, American Indians. You should watch (ph) that. WATTERS: I'm sorry. I'm sorry. But you're trying to -- you're handing these guys, your opponents a loaded gun when you say things these things. It wasn't just demonic. They made a Nazi comparison. The gates of Hell. The enemies. It's explosive stuff. They've just got to polish it up, because you can't say this stuff anymore. GUILFOYLE: Dana. PERINO: Well, I think on the bigger picture, it's a march from the left to shut down the free expression of anybody who they disagree with. I might disagree with that as well, but guess what? This is what I do. I don't watch it. There's a Web site, the Daily Mail Web site, it's a great place. People love to go to that Web site. You can find a lot of stories on there. It is so disturbing to me. If I ever find myself looking at some of the stories and digging deeper and going farther. It's just so debasing. I have to turn it off, and I walk away. So I don't watch it. Same thing with "Sister Wives." I don't watch "Sister Wives," because I don't want to talk about polygamy. BECKEL: Do they grow -- do they grow vegetables that are demonic? PERINO: No. BECKEL: Are you talking about this? You're not... PERINO: I'm talking about a bigger picture thing. BECKEL: I'm sorry. I thought you were talking about Home or Garden.... PERINO: No, I mean the whole left, Bob. I'm talking about the whole left. GUILFOYLE: Do the producers have something for Bob today? BECKEL: No. It's home and -- what? I'm sorry. GUILFOYLE: All right. Never mind. Let's -- moving on. Yes. Make sure to catch "The O'Reilly Factor" tonight for Eric's full interview with the Benham brothers. This is going to answer all your questions. That's 8 p.m. Eastern, so don't miss it. It's going to be fantastic. And up next, the secrets to a lasting marriage? Are you kidding me? Is this a joke? From none other than bachelor Bob. Oh, yes. Give me the advice I need. He's got some important tips for all those couples out there, so stay tuned. (COMMERCIAL BREAK) BECKEL: Well, I was married once. It didn't last long, but I got two great kids out of it. But if I'd known this, it might have. According to a new report, couples who equally share their chores around the house... GUILFOYLE: This is so funny. BECKEL: ... are more likely to stay together than those who don't. Apparently, when one person is doing more of the work, resentment sets in. Well, my old lady used to nag me about that all the time. BOLLING: "My old lady." Maybe that's part of the problem. GUILFOYLE: Right. BECKEL: You find -- you find this to be a true statement. Dana, you were one who -- I mean, I know -- I've been to your home. I know your husband is a wonderful guy. I know two instances that -- where you've been particularly uncomfortable. One was a purple glove... PERINO: Yes. BECKEL: ... that was there for three days and you went ballistic over it, and then he didn't hang... PERINO: I didn't go ballistic. I kept very calm. But I was irritated. BECKEL: But you kept going -- what you did was you went... WATTERS: It was your husband's purple glove? PERINO: No, it was a cleaning lady's purple glove. She left it on accident on the nightstand, and he left it there for, like, three days. And I was like, "Surely, he's going to pick that up. Surely, he's going to pick it up." Finally, on the third day, I put it, you know, where he couldn't help but miss it. And I mentioned it on the show. Which is also how I got the poster of Jasper finally hung up in the kitchen, because I was complaining. BECKEL: But see, this is the problem. Women, when they keep coming at you. PERINO: That was six months. BECKEL: Yes, but they keep coming at you. They nag and nag and nag. There's a certain resentment that sets in, that says, "The hell with that." PERINO: What about my resentment to having a poster available for six months and not hung up? BECKEL: Well, you're right. OK. GUILFOYLE: Why don't you just do what you're asked the first time, so you don't... BECKEL: Why? GUILFOYLE: ... wear us out by being so super annoying and lagging and not getting your stuff done? BECKEL: Did you nag -- well, you've been divorced five times, so did you nag... GUILFOYLE: I so have not been divorced five times.

BECKEL: Did you used to nag your husbands?

GUILFOYLE: I don't know, maybe. You know what? They nagged me, too, and bothered me, so there you go.

BECKEL: Jesse -- Jesse said to me on the break, "Don't mention this, because if I have to say in on the air, I'm in real trouble," but his wife nags him all the time.

WATTERS: No, wait a second. I did not say that.

PERINO: No, he said probably because he doesn't do his chores.

WATTERS: That's more of what I said. But that doesn't sound good, OK?

GUILFOYLE: Now you're in trouble.

WATTERS: Now I'm really in trouble.

GUILFOYLE: You got Beckeled, because you can't tell Bob, and then he says it.

WATTERS: I had to call my wife when I saw this was going to be the segment and say, "Honey, I'm afraid I'm going to say something sexist. What are my chores? I make the bed, right? I vacuum."

And she says, "Jesse..."

BECKEL: You make the bed and you vacuum?

WATTERS: .".. it's not a chore if you make the bed once a month." So apparently, my only chores that I do regularly are feed the cats and take out the trash.

PERINO: Take out the trash is excellent.

BECKEL: Let's talk to the wuss man himself here.

BOLLING: I'm going to be very guilty of being a wussy right now.

BECKEL: You are, because I'm sure you do whatever your old lady says to do, right?

BOLLING: You know what? I pretty much do. I think Kimberly's right. The way -- you know, keep it cool at home. So if she asks you to change some light bulbs or do -- you just do it.

GUILFOYLE: Why wouldn't you do it?

BOLLING: Do it. It's just easier.

BECKEL: It's OK to do it. They start working on it in the morning, and it goes all day long. Or how's this? You get something and you think you've got it resolved. Six months later at the dinner table she says, "What is this about that thing?"

PERINO: Why didn't you hang up that poster of Jasper that I asked you to hang up?

GUILFOYLE: Can you imagine Bob's poor wife? The poor...

BECKEL: She's a very nice woman.

PERINO: But Bob, what -- I would love to know. What chores did you have?

GUILFOYLE: He didn't do anything.

BECKEL: I had plenty of chores.

PERINO: Like what?

BECKEL: I had to move books around.

PERINO: That's not a chore.

BECKEL: I had to do -- take my...

PERINO: A chore is something you have to do regularly.

BECKEL: One thing I did find out...

WATTERS: Get a housekeeper. You have enough money. Just hire the housekeeper.

BECKEL: I did. But listen, you know one thing about this...

GUILFOYLE: He needs one at his place now, let me tell you.

BECKEL: Men do male-oriented things like do the yard work and change the oil, and women do stuff in the house. Men get more sex that way.

WATTERS: I'm going to go home and mow the lawn now.

GUILFOYLE: That was the only part of the study that he paid attention to.

BECKEL: If I were you, after four months, it's time for you. OK?

GUILFOYLE: That's why you've got to do a "honey do" list. Honey do this. Honey do this and that. And it's very sweet.

BECKEL: Yes, but that's the thing...

GUILFOYLE: No. Bob, when there's a big reward at the end, they like it.

BECKEL: Yes. Well, if it's clear that's the reward, but usually it's more nagging and frankly -- but as I said, I got two great kids out of it, and my ex-wife is a nice lady. And she had to live with me, and I've got to give her that.

Coming up, round one of the NFL draft was definitely a nail biter for one start college quarterback. Heisman Trophy winner Johnny Football had to wait a long wait last night, but did his wait pay off?

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

WATTERS; Two-time All American and Heisman Trophy winner, Johnny Football, a.k.a. Johnny Manziel waited longer than expected at last night's NFL draft to hear his name called.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: With the first pick in the 2014 NFL draft, the Houston Texans select Jadeveon Clowney.

The third pick in the 2014 NFL draft, the Jacksonville Jaguars select Blake Bortles.

The 15th pick in the 2014 NFL draft, the Dallas Cowboys select Zach Martin, guard, Notre Dame.

With the 22nd pick in the 2014 NFL draft, the Cleveland Browns select Johnny Manziel, quarterback, Texas A&M.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

WATTERS: While the media mused on how Johnny would react, the star QB didn't seem to be taking it too hard. Here he is hitting a club in New York City last night, where he reportedly sprayed champagne until 5 a.m.

GUILFOYLE: Is that a FOX News alert?

WATTERS: Just like Bob.

BECKEL: Yes, in New York.

WATTERS: Let's go to Bolling on this. You know the knocks on this guy: He's under size. You know, he has this backyard style of play. He had some off the field incidents. But he had a great Pro Day.

PERINO: Are you talking about Greg Gutfeld?

WATTERS: No.

GUILFOYLE: Undersized, yes.

WATTERS: I mean, he had a great career in college. Do you feel bad for him?

BOLLING: No. But here's what I think went on. So a lot of teams waited. They said, you know, they passed on Johnny Manziel for a lot of reasons, other than his -- he's only five -- he's under six feet, which would be very short for an NFL quarterback. Not because of that. He wins games. He's proven that his height isn't going to keep him from winning games.

I think they did because of all the antics. He plays a lot of -- I happen to like him. I like what he does. He just does it. Remember, he had that whole "I'm going to sign autographs for money. I don't care."

WATTERS: Right.

BOLLING: And he got selected and he did this with the money thing. So he's very in your face. And I think a lot of teams didn't want that distraction right now. That's why they passed.

But I think Cleveland got a good quarterback for a 22nd pick, draft.

WATTERS: Right. Now, we got a scouting report here from the New England Patriots, hot off the presses. And you look at the background they did on this guy. This is what they said about him: "Spoiled brat" because his dad bought him a luxury car. Quote, "Outlaw blood lines." OK? And then my favorite, "High knotted calves with pretty good thickness in the thighs and bubble."

BOLLING: Of course that's your favorite.

WATTERS: I don't know that that means.

PERINO: I would be devastated if somebody wrote that about me.

BECKEL: Right. A, I don't think he's that good of a quarterback. He's too short. He did not play an NFL-style offense. He played at Texas A&M. Have you seen their schedule?

GUILFOYLE: Well, that's what they think, backyard football.

BECKEL: It ain't that big except for Texas, and he got beat by Texas.

WATTERS: I mean, they played Alabama. They played LSU.

BECKEL: Yes, and they got beat.

WATTERS: Yes, but he rips them up.

BOLLING: It's a top-notch football program. He was a star quarterback. He broke records across the...

GUILFOYLE: The point is ...

BECKEL: Can I make one other point?

GUILFOYLE: Ay, yi, yi.

BECKEL: I'm sorry. Most of the top ten picks were mostly defensive, and a lot of these teams are looking for defensive help and that's one of the reasons quarterbacks fell down.

WATTERS: Kimberly, what do you think?

GUILFOYLE: It's not over for him. Let's see what he does with it. Eric doesn't like it. We had a little back and forth, because he's going to Cleveland. He like, "Oh, it's not a good team. It's not a good quarterback history if you play there."

And I was like, "Kosar to Slaughter," and then he accused me of being fed that information.

BOLLING: I don't know this.

GUILFOYLE: Yes, a 19 win. Ninety-one.

WATTERS: And this guy is running around with all these hot girlfriends. He's hanging out with Drake, with George H.W. Bush.

PERINO: What a loser. I mean, that's the thing. I don't understand.

I think that I would recommend putting the players off to the side in a room where you can't see them so that you don't have the attempts to humiliate somebody while they're sitting there waiting to see if they'll get picked.

GUILFOYLE: Right.

BECKEL: He's the only guy that Dana would be about the same size as.

GUILFOYLE: Oh, my gosh.

PERINO: I did feel like -- I felt bad for him. I was thinking of the movie "Bridesmaids."

WATTERS: That's right.

PERINO: Like he's always going to be the bridesmaid.

WATTERS: That's right. Yes. Like a lady quince (ph).

GUILFOYLE: Let's see what he does.

WATTERS: All right. "One More Thing" is up next.

GUILFOYLE: There you go.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

BOLLING: All righty. Time for "One More Thing." K.G., you have a special one.

GUILFOYLE: Yes, we want to wish a very special happy birthday to our very own Dana Perino.

PERINO: Thank you. How much we love you. Thank you.

GUILFOYLE: She's getting younger and more beautiful looking every year.

PERINO: Do you know that this is our third birthday of mine that we've spent together?

GUILFOYLE: Isn't that sweet?

PERINO: Isn't that interesting?

GUILFOYLE: Seems like an anniversary birthday.

BECKEL: You know, we would have sang "Happy Birthday" to you, but they've got some ridiculous thing on it.

GUILFOYLE: We're going to cut the cake.

BOLLING: There's a copyright on it. We're not allowed -- we're not allowed to sing "Happy Birthday."

BECKEL: Well, the copyright is full of...

BOLLING: We would love to sing "Happy Birthday."

PERINO: Yes, well you know what? It's the thought that counts.

WATTERS: Thank you.

PERINO: And I will just internalize that you sang "Happy Birthday."

BECKEL: I'm singing it right now in my head.

PERINO: Bob got me flowers today. Did anybody put you up to that, Bob?

BECKEL: No, I did it myself.

GUILFOYLE: I caught it. Bob demanded that I cut him a big piece.

BECKEL: Thank you.

BOLLING: They're telling me to move on, so Dana, your "One More Thing."

PERINO: OK. I just have a "One More Thing." I liked this in "The Wall Street Journal" today. They had the best selling products of all time. At the top 10, PlayStation. The second one is Lipitor, which I think is hilarious. Then the Corolla, "Star Wars," iPad. Understand that. Mario Brothers franchise, Michael Jackson's "Thriller," Harry Potter, the iPhone, and No. 10, the Rubik's Cube.

BOLLING: Very good. Very cool.

PERINO: Did you like that? I thought you would like that.

BECKEL: The Rubik's Cube. Really?

PERINO: Yes.

GUILFOYLE: You only want a small piece?

PERINO: Yes, I'll take that one.

BOLLING: There we go. I'm up next. Don't forget to watch "The O'Reilly Factor" tonight. We have those two brothers, Jason and David Benham, the guys who were fired from HGTV for their -- their stance on traditional values like...

BECKEL: Who's hosting tonight?

BOLLING: Some guy named Eric Bolling.

BECKEL: Oh, I see.

BOLLING: So it will be good. And "Cashin' In" tomorrow morning, 11:30. Don't forget. Also going to be a good one.

Bob, if you can take a second from eating. Can you?

BECKEL: My "One More Thing"?

GUILFOYLE: Oh, my God.

BECKEL: Twenty years ago today, one of the great events in history happened. Nelson Mandela, who had just gotten out of jail, was elected president of South Africa. And one of the -- I think really the great titans of the last hundred years, and he's now passed on but what a great, great, great event that was.

BOLLING: Very good. Very good. Well-done, Bob. Jesse, you're bringing up the rear.

WATTERS: OK. My "One More Thing." I don't know what that means.

BOLLING: So to speak.

BECKEL: Apologize to your wife.

GUILFOYLE: Thanks to Bob.

WATTERS: OK, so I was looking on my favorite Web site the other day, Bar Stool Sports. Came across a great video. It involves dogs. So I think Dana is really going to like this one.

There's a black bear coming up to this house in New Hampshire, OK. Walking around, all right. So we've got some people that need to protect the house.

PERINO: Wow.

WATTERS: Two bulldogs corner, confront the black bear.

BOLLING: That's awesome.

WATTERS: Who do you think wins?

PERINO: Dogs.

BOLLING: Always the doggies.

WATTERS: Dogs.

BOLLING: Good boys! Good boys!

WATTERS: The dogs always win. There you go.

BOLLING: And can I point out the piece of cake that Kimberly cut me - - can you look at this piece of cake?

GUILFOYLE: I know you're worried. You see the big, thick one I gave to Bob?

BOLLING: What's up with that, K.G.?

PERINO: I like it. I appreciate that.

GUILFOYLE: You said you wanted a little piece.

BOLLING: Quick thought. Quick thought around the table. Mother's Day. Happy Mother's Day this weekend. Right?

Happy Mother's Day to you.

GUILFOYLE: Happy Mother's Day to...

PERINO: Happy Mother's Day to you. And also, our colleague, Greg Gutfeld, who's not here today because he went to see his mom.

Hello, Jackie, if you're watching.

GUILFOYLE: Happy Mother's Day.

BECKEL: My mother has passed away. But the mother of my children is a wonderful person and happy Mother's Day to you.

BOLLING: And happy Mother's Day you, the mother of Jasper, who is very proud of you.

BOLLING : Does that count?

BOLLING: Of course it counts.

PERINO: Does it count if you're the mother of a dog?

WATTERS: We'll let it count.

GUILFOYLE: And to the moms that aren't here. Your mom and my mom and we want to say...

PERINO: And my mom.

GUILFOYLE: ... happy Mother's Day to Andrea's mom.

WATTERS: And my mom.

BOLLING: Say good-night.

WATTERS: ... Watters.

PERINO: Everybody's mom.

BOLLING: See, it's one big, happy family.

PERINO: Even Bill O'Reilly's.

BOLLING: Don't forget to set your DVRs. We've got to go. See you Monday.

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