OTR Interviews

Krauthammer: 'Glaring questions unanswered' about Benghazi

Charles Krauthammer on Hillary Clinton's reaction to the formation of a select committee on Benghazi, new revelations in scandal

 

This is a rush transcript from "On the Record," May 7, 2014. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated.

GRETA VAN SUSTEREN, FOX NEWS HOST: For the first time, Former Secretary Of State Hillary Clinton talking about the new select committee on Benghazi. Secretary Clinton insisting she's satisfied with what we already know about the deadly attack. She talks to ABC's Robin Roberts.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

HILLARY CLINTON, FORMER SECRETARY OF STATE: Absolutely, I mean, of course, there are a lot of reasons why despite all of the hearings, all of the information that's been provided, some choose not to be satisfied and choose to continue to move forward. That's their choice. And I do not believe there is any reason for it to continue in this way, but they get to call the shots in the congress.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

VAN SUSTEREN: Charles Krauthammer, author of the blockbuster book, "All Things That Matter," joins us. Nice to see you, Charles.

CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER, FOX NEWS CONTRIBUTOR/AUTHOR, "ALL THINGS THAT MATTER": Great to see you, Greta.

VAN SUSTEREN: Benghazi just had a vote, six democrats actually cross the aisle and voted with -- about Benghazi. Actually, I'm mistaken about that, but it was a party line. What about Benghazi?

KRAUTHAMMER: Look, when you hear Secretary Clinton says, all the questions have been answered, but I understand, like, people have their reasons. What she's saying is, the only people WHO are still interested in Benghazi are people who are partisans, and who want somehow to get at me.

There are glaring questions that are unanswered. And the fact that the story was revised a couple weeks ago has to do with the fact that something emerged. For a year and a half, the administration had not release a memo, it was actually a directive.

A memo from a national security council to Susan Rice telling her to press the story of the video, just before she went on TV. The memo was entitled prep for Susan Rice to go on TV. Now, this contradicts story for 18 months on the administration, that know, she got all the information from the CIA, that's why she brought up the video. She wasn't getting any pressure from the White House. So, now we know.

So, to me, what's important is will the select committee come out with new facts? There were so many unknowns, so many damaging, that I think it will, and that's why I think the committee ought to go ahead. And her [Clinton's] pretense and all the questions have been answered is ridiculous.

VAN SUSTEREN: Well, the vote has not occurred, that's gonna be tomorrow -- I was confused about that. The one with the six democrats crossing over, were the six democrats for the Lois Lerner contempt. Is this at all significant, this vote?

KRAUTHAMMER: Well, they took a second vote where they asked the attorney general to appoint a special prosecutor, to game of the scandal, and 26 democrats crossed the aisle.

VAN SUSTEREN: Everybody hates the IRS, though.

KRAUTHAMMER: Well, because you don't want to be a democrat seen as standing in the way of an investigation of what looks to me to be very clearly a violation of the trust. The IRS making political choices and persecuting organizations on the basis of their ideology, you know, everybody is afraid of the IRS. But at least if you think they are administrating their powers, and they are very great. In a fair way, you will accept it. This is obviously unfair. And that's a lot of democrat who went against their leadership. Who are trying to pretend this is no scandal though. The president said that there wasn't a smidgen of corruption in the IRS scandal.

VAN SUSTEREN: The rich had said, it was outrageous.

(CROSSTALK)

KRAUTHAMMER: Exactly. And between those two statements, there was no change in the facts.

VAN SUSTEREN: We have three seconds left. We're just talking to the panel about the Lewinsky Story in 2016. Is this story an issue at all for the former secretary of state if she runs?

KRAUTHAMMER: I think not. I think if anything, the timing, and this is gonna help, for more than 2 years out. It will bring it up for awhile. In some ways it insulates her if it's -- it's a form of development of antibodies. So, if I were her, I would be happy about this, but better now than on the eve of the election.

VAN SUSTEREN: Charles, nice to see you. Thank you.

KRAUTHAMMER: Pleasure to be here.