THE FIVE

Obama's praise of Sorkin's 'Newsroom' is revealing

President praises screenwriter at fundraiser

 

This is a rush transcript from "The Five," August 7, 2012. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated.

GREG GUTFELD, CO-HOST: Barack Obama has been called a lot of things, including socialist. Although 25 years ago, he would have said "cool" and passed you the chum (ph).

But nothing compares to what the president says about himself indirectly. At a recent fundraiser, he spoke of Aaron Sorkin, the guy behind "Newsroom," that self important smoothie of arrogant leftism brought to you by Bill Maher's pet network HBO. He said, "Aaron Sorkin, who writes the way every Democrat in Washington wished they spoke. Aaron, thank you."

And so, left wing object prop is really Obama's secret dream fantasy, which is kind of creepy. I mean, the only people who think "Newsroom" is cool are dopey coeds and the four remaining brain cells in Dan Rather's head.

Incredibly, the president doesn't see "Newsroom" as something to avoid like Ebola, but instead something to aspire to. How could someone who supposedly went to Columbia and Harvard Law believe in this crud?

And so, I must add my voice to those calling on Obama to release his college transcripts. There's got to be some explanation for why a grown man wants the world to be a freshman dorm room weed fantasy.

So, prove me wrong, Mr. Prez, as you're known to be the most brilliant president since Thomas Jefferson -- he was a president, I think.

Let's see those stellar grades, because if you're that smart, you couldn't love "The Newsroom." Of course, there could be another explanation, that the show is Columbia and Harvard see the world as well, which explains why Obama thinks slogans of windmills will get him a second term.

Everybody says he's so smart, but his favorite show was "Entourage." His favorite show was "Entourage" and now he loves this show. I don't know one person, who watches "The Newsroom," Andrea, and says any good and I count liberals among that.

ANDREA TANTAROS, CO-HOST: Yes, it's not that good. But I actually like "Entourage." So, don't lump in that category.

GUTFELD: How can you like that show?

TANTAROS: I do like it. But isn't he essentially saying that Aaron Sorkin is smarter than he is, right? He is writing the way that Democrats wish they could speak. Does Obama secretly wish that he had Sorkin's brain?

GUTFELD: Yes.

TANTAROS: Last night, I was sitting around -- and I know Connecticut is just north of here -- but I heard a large sucking sound in that room. Not only did he suck up to Sorkin, he sucked up to Anne Hathaway. I mean, that's what he does. He sucks up to celebrities, the one percent.

ERIC BOLLING, CO-HOST: I like it. I like it.

GUTFELD: You like "Newsroom"?

BOLLING: I do.

GUTFELD: How can you say that?!

BOLLING: I know. I like to see the liberal brain at work. It's kind of comical. It's fun to watch.

GUTFELD: It is fun to watch? I watch the first episode, 40 minutes of it, and I threw up. Metaphorically, anyway.

TANTAROS: How could it be fun to watch? I have an intestinal crisis when I watch that.

BOLLING: You know, you take it with a little bit of grain like you watch Ron Burgundy during "Anchorman" --

GUTFELD: You were drinking during that.

TANTAROS: A grain? A triple helping of salt --

(CROSSTALK)

GUTFELD: Bob, isn't this proof he kind of lives in a make-believe world?

(LAUGHTER)

BECKEL: What's that?

BOLLING: What's wrong, Bob?

BOB BECKEL, CO-HOST: Nothing.

Let me just put this -- you keep coming back to these fundraisers with these Hollywood people. Mitt Romney had twice as many fundraisers in July as Barack Obama did. We don't talk about that for some reason. He had one in Israel with a bunch of diamond merchants. We don't know the names of them.

GUTFELD: Is that true?

BECKEL: And the Koch brothers who have put -- who are the right wingers of right wingers -- I'm not supposed to say that. And then he was in London and raised millions of millions of dollars and nobody knows who went to the thing.

So, at least in Barack Obama's case, you know who's there. You can make fun of them. You make all the rest of that thing. But in Mitt Romney's world, everybody gets hidden, including his taxes. That's what I got to say.

GUTFELD: He really is an outsider, that Mitt.

TANTAROS: Well, it was actually George Clooney who was in Switzerland for President Obama fundraising there for him. So, I don't know if we know who was there or not. I actually really don't give a crap, either.

BECKEL: Is there something wrong with that?

DANA PERINO, CO-HOST: No, but I just think it's the equivalent of you what you were just accusing Mitt Romney of.

BECKEL: What? I'm accusing Romney of not telling us who's raising his money.

BECKEL: No, you said -- and I also love the dog whistle of the diamond merchant. What the hell do you think -- we know who you are talking about when you say that. It's just -- anyway --

GUTFELD: No, we could be talking about Sweden, the diamond merchants.

PERINO: Right. But one thing about the Aaron Sorkin tweet that I thought was a little bit revealing is that it talks to you about how people love a great speech. But governing actually is a lot more tedious and you have to find compromises and it's hard, and it's a slog.

But the fun stuff is the giving great wonderful speech where everybody claps for you.

GUTFELD: Yes, exactly.

PERINO: That's what you got like in "The West Wing." It was a great show. I loved it. But it's not reality.

BOLLING: I like George Clooney, too. Is that bad?

GUTFELD: No, I think he's --

BOLLING: When we were at the White House Correspondents Dinners and I went up to him and I was going to shake his hand. I said, Mr. Clooney, I like your work. He said you're the guy with no tie on Fox. I like that guy.

GUTFELD: All right. Enough name-dropping. Zero --

BOLLING: I was with you, dude.

GUTFELD: I don't remember one minute of it.

"Zero Dark 30" -- the trailer is released, the Kathryn Bigelow movie about the bin Laden raid. Do you want to roll some of this?

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP, "ZERO DARK THIRTY"/COLOMBIA PICTURES)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The whole world's going to want to know this.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: I want targets.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: When was the last time you saw bin Laden?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Oh my God, is that what I think it is?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: When was the last time you saw bin Laden?

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GUTFELD: So, Andrea, at the end of this trailer, does it say "I'm Barack Obama and I approve this message"?

(LAUGHTER)

TANTAROS: It might as well. I was actually wondering who is playing him in the movie.

GUTFELD: Yes.

TANTAROS: They're going to have this big part about how he was sitting grappling at his desk of what to do and how he made the call. And it will probably make him look like the hero.

PERINO: Oh, not coming off a golf course.

TANTAROS: Right.

PERINO: That wasn't going to be a good image. I would watch this, though.

GUTFELD: Of course. She's a great filmmaker. But the fact -- I mean, the question is the timing. They had to push it after the election.

BOLLING: Not only that, Greg. You know, there's a lot of allegations that the White House is leaking inside detail, some classified information, to Kathryn Bigelow about what actually went on.

GUTFELD: And that's played off in the trailer with all these redacted stuff.

TANTAROS: By the way, Greg, I saw the credits at the end. It says executive producer, Barack Obama.

GUTFELD: Bob, any final thoughts?

BECKEL: Yes. Barack Obama was the one who made the call on bin Laden, period.

GUTFELD: OK, fair enough.

BOLLING: Do you want to see a good movie about real heroes?

BECKEL: "Ted."

BOLLING: Go see "Act of Valor." Those are real Navy SEALs.

GUTFELD: Bob said "Ted."

(LAUGHTER)

GUTFELD: Bob said -- that's about the talking Teddy bear.

BECKEL: That's correct.

(LAUGHTER)

BECKEL: Which is Mitt Romney.

TANTAROS: Which one viewer said is sort of like Bob in his drinking days.

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