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Special Report

Rep. Etheridge's Embarrassing Way of Not Commenting

Contact Sport

North Carolina Congressman Bob Etheridge has apologized after a video of the Democrat's confrontation with a student went viral. Etheridge was, well, visibly irked.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Do you fully support the Obama agenda?

REP. BOB ETHERIDGE, D-N.C.: Who are you? Who are you? I have a right to know who you are.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We are students.

ETHERIDGE: Who are you?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Let go of my arm sir.

ETHERIDGE: Who are you?

(GRABS UNIDENTIFIED MALE BY NECK)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Sir, sir sir, please

ETHERIDGE: Who are you?

(LETS UNIDENTIFIED MALE WALK AWAY)

(END VIDEO CLIP)

Etheridge said during a news conference today, "I apologize for my actions. They were unacceptable." No word yet who the students were.

Nobel Choice

President Obama and White House officials frequently tout Energy Secretary Steven Chu's credentials while working on the Gulf oil spill, saying they "just happen to have a Nobel Prize-winning physicist on our staff." 

Chu's Nobel past has been mentioned at least 10 times since the spill began. But a New York Times article describes an instance where the complexity of capping the oil well was just as challenging to a Nobel prize winner, "Chu wondered aloud why oil was still spewing from around the bottom. Engineers had to tell him that the leaks were expected."

Revolving Door

Bloomberg's Ed Chen is leaving journalism to join the Natural Resources Defense Council, telling Politico the oil spill prompted his decision to resume doing what he called the Lord's work in fighting climate change. Politico noted the ease with which reporters jump between journalism and advocacy  seems to be increasing and that it, "will likely reinforce notions... that all journalists are biased and largely towards Democratic-friendly organizations." 

Politico noted that it too has struggled with the revolving door. Politico reporter Jonathan Allen left for a short time to work for a Democratic congresswoman. 

Allen had said before returning to Politico, "I'm hopeful I can advance the Democratic Party's goals and obviously the congresswoman's goals."