THE FIVE

'Game Change' not about Sarah Palin

Time for conservatives to flip the script

 

This is a rush transcript from "The Five," March 12, 2012. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated.

GREG GUTFELD, CO-HOST: So, I didn't see the movie "Game Change." I've been on vacation and the nude rodeo camp didn't have cable. And come on, I already know the story. It's not about Sarah Palin. It's about us and how dumb the film and TV industry thinks we really are.

We're dumb -- they think -- because we don't bend to their lazy assumptions about life -- that America is evil, the left are always compassionate and Republicans eat babies.

Yes, so Hollywood reeks. But what did you expect? Asking Hollywood to rip is like asking a Van Halen tribute band to make fun of Van Halen. You can't skewer those you idolize.

See, Hollywood is nothing more than a tribute band for the left, banging out hit after hit on the right, when not sleeping with roofied starlets in PETA shorts.

But whose fault is that?

My mike fell off. How'd that happened? Somebody is getting fired.

(LAUGHTER)

Yes, I'll hold it like this.

Look, if there is a restaurant that serves fast -- food that's bad, you avoid it. But if every restaurant serves bad food, then you got to make your own.

So, it's time for conservatives to stop complaining and start doing. We need a new generation of right-thinking chefs with a mission to make the food you want to eat. Our kids need to write. They need to go to film school. They need to invade pop culture, or the joke will always be on us. Until then, movies will be oh-so-predictable and so are will our complaints.

It may take decades to complete this mission, but it's the only way to make a game change for real.

DANA PERINO, CO-HOST: I agree with that in terms like conservatives should definitely -- there is a market. You know, I think that there is money to be made as well.

(CROSSTALK)

ERIC BOLLING, CO-HOST: Can I just point out, I watched that movie twice.

PERINO: You did?

BOLLING: Yes. I watched it Saturday night and I watched it Sunday afternoon. And I got to tell you, it was an MSNBC, NBC liberal media hit job on that one woman there, Governor Sarah Palin. Not on John McCain. It went right after Sarah Palin.

That's Nicolle Wallace portrayed by that woman right there. And also, Steve Schmidt. Two high-level advisers in the McCain camp during the 2008 election. And they trashed her. They absolutely trashed Governor Palin.

And they were so inconsistent. At first, give you one quick example.

GUTFELD: Yes.

BOLLING: At first, they start the movie where she leans over to Schmidt and says, I really want to get out of Alaska. And then they spend the next hour-and-a-half explaining how much she loved Alaska and the Alaska newspapers.

There were inconsistencies throughout. Clearly, it was a left-leaning hit job.

GUTFELD: Here's the thing, you pointed out, Dana -- or Drew Garrity pointed out -- that Sarah Palin's name didn't appear in the book, the actual book, "Game Change," until page 351. Yet, this whole thing is about her.

PERINO: Right. I guess it's because she is the most fascinating and most interesting.

GUTFELD: Yes.

PERINO: Yes. I mean, the first American, the first black American president wasn't really that interesting.

(LAUGHTER)

GUTFELD: Yes, exactly.

PERINO: And they weren't going to do a movie about it.

But I never quite understood the complete and total fascination and obsession about her. And I have friends that worked on both campaigns. And so, I watched -- I got to see the second half of the movie.

The one thing about Sarah Palin, is this -- at the very end of the movie, they say they think that she'll just fade away. And, boy, was that wrong.

PERINO: Tamara, what did you -- did you get a chance to see the movie?

TAMARA HOLDER, GUEST CO-HOST: I actually watched it twice as well.

GUTFELD: Really?

HOLDER: Yes.

KIMBERLY GUILFOYLE, CO-HOST: Good job.

HOLDER: I know.

GUILFOYLE: Me, too.

HOLDER: I should get an A.

GUTFELD: Did you play any drinking games?

HOLDER: Oh, every time I'm watching TV or doing anything, I play drinking games. In fact --

(CROSSTALK)

HOLDER: Anyway, I don't think is, necessarily a liberal media debate here. You know, here's the woman -- if somebody came up to any of us -- besides maybe you, Dana -- and said, you are going to run for vice president, I would be like, OK? Are you kidding me? Like, of course, I'm going to be attacked. You have to understand that you are walking in to a lion's den.

But at the same time, we have to commend a woman who rose from nothing and became something. But on the other side, do we really want a woman like that to be our vice president?

BOLLING: Like what? Like what? And that's the point. The movie portrayed her as something that she really is nothing like. She is a wonderful mother. She is a smart, intelligent woman. She has the ability to unite people -- the conservative base.

HOLDER: But at the end of the day, she didn't have the experience.

GUTFELD: But at the end of the day, neither did Barack Obama.

GUILFOYLE: Listen, I think it was very mean-spirited. Like you said, there's a number of inconsistency on it. I mean, she should be commended. She's hardworking. She loves her country. She is a dedicated mother. There are a lot of things to admire greatly about Sarah Palin and she did jump to the opportunity to be able to serve the country. And I think if it was a guy, they wouldn't be making a movie like that depicting her as having mental illness and being hysterical.

GUTFELD: I don't think that's the case. I don't think it's a gender thing. I just think -- she was symbolic of everything that Hollywood finds comical. She is a conservative woman, who doesn't sound like them. So, she's a lightning rod for this. It just made it easier of them to find this symbol to make fun of.

GUILFOYLE: Well, she's had the last laugh.

GUTFELD: Has she? Has she really?

GUILFOYLE: Oh she has. She's probably laughing right now.

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