Iron Man suit goes on sale ꟷ but it'll cost $440G

You don't need to be Tony Stark to wear this suit, but you might need to be him to afford it.

British inventor Richard Browning, who came to prominence last year with the unveiling of his new "Iron Man"-like suit, has revealed that the suit is finally available for sale — at a whopping price tag of £340,000 ($443,428).

On Wednesday, Browning made a demonstration of the suit taking it on a short flight around the luxury department store Selfridges, in London.

Gravity founder Richard Browning fields questions about his personal flight suit at a TED Conference in Vancouver, Canada, on April 27, 2017.
Using thrusters attached to his arms and back, Browning flew in a circle and hovered a short distance from the ground, captivating attendees of a prestigious TED Conference with the demonstration. The personal flight suit is capable of propelling wearers much higher and faster, according to its creators. / AFP PHOTO / Glenn CHAPMAN / TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY Glenn CHAPMAN "US-Canada-Britain-lifestyle-aviation-technology-TED-Gravity""        (Photo credit should read GLENN CHAPMAN/AFP/Getty Images)

 (Credit: Getty)

Selfridges is now selling custom-made versions of the exorbitantly priced suit, The Daily Mail reported, but it isn't available to anyone: the supply is limited and only nine people can order it, along with a course on how to fly.

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The suit is being made by Browning's Gravy Industries, which describes itself as being able to "augment the body and mind with a suit of patent-pending technology to enable unparalleled human flight."

A former Royal Marine Reservist and ultra-marathon runner, Browning has been compared to the fictional Tony Stark, made popular by Robert Downey Jr. in the "Iron Man" and "Avenger" movies.

 (Credit: Getty)

In November 2017, Browning achieved a speed of 32.02 mph while wearing the suit, setting a record for "fastest speed in a body-controlled jet engine-powered suit."

In theory, the suit could go as fast as 180 mph, according to The Evening Standard.

Speaking with the Standard, Bosse Myhr, who is menswear and technology director at Selfridges, said the suit is the next step in flight. “The Jet Suit is the equivalent to the launch of the very first aeroplane," he said. "We are on the cusp of an era where aeronautical technology can finally be in the hands of the consumer and we are proud to be the first to offer this.”

The suit weighs approximately 59 pounds and can reach an altitude of 12,000 feet, according to the Mail. Browning, however, who has flown the suit at "45 events across 16 countries including at four TED talks and two Wired events," has only gone a few feet in the air for safety purposes.

The suit's actual name is "Daedalus Mark 1," which Browning previously said was the brainchild of his then 8-year old son.

The suit is able to run on jet fuel or diesel, something that determines the amount of time a person is able to wear it, Browning said. 

"This consumes about four liters a minute in the hover (position) so you can fly for three or four minutes quite easily, and we have got another version — certainly on a cold day when you get more thrust, it'll fly for about nine minutes," Browning said.

He added that the company is looking to improve the fly time, "but it's the inevitable consequence of flying without wings."

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News that Browning's suit will go on sale comes just weeks after the U.S. Army said it was testing and prototyping self-generating “Ironman-like” soldier exoskeletons.

The Army's suit is designed to support soldier movement, generate electricity, power weapons systems and substantially lower the amount of weight soldiers deal with on the battlefield.

The emerging concept, which Army developers described as "a technical breakthrough," would be something seen on battlefields 10 to 20 years in the future.

Follow Chris Ciaccia on Twitter @Chris_Ciaccia