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The rise of the BYOB hackerspace -- just bring your own brain

 

Introducing the ‘hackerspace’ -- a do-it-yourself space where everyday people can create extraordinary things.

The concept is simple: Come to a hackerspace with an idea, and leave with something you can touch and use. The folks inside will provide the supplies, training and wisdom to help you get the job done.

"You can walk in and just say 'look I want to make this thing, I don't know how to do it. Can you give me some help?' And our people just jump out the woodwork to get you the skills and the materials you need," said Josh Banno, a founding member of Xerocraft Hackerspace in Tucson, Ariz.

'When you have all these different people ... crossing over in the same space, a lot of really amazing ideas come out.'

- Josh Banno, a founding member of Xerocraft Hackerspace

Hackerspaces are popping up all over the country, and even the world, Banno told FoxNews.com. Xerocraft is a non-profit, where anyone can use the facility.

And there are plenty of materials to choose from. Xerocraft comes complete with 3D printers, lasers, a woodwork shop, and plenty of tools to tinker to your heart’s desire.

Hackerspaces are used to create everything from kitchen tables to robots. Steven Bowtie of Tucson built the "Bar-bot" at Xerocraft, a fully-functioning, shot-pouring robot that can fill your flask or pour a jigger at the press of a button on your phone.

"We took a fridge and some electrical parts, and in less than 24 hours, we made it into a network controlled, alcohol dispensing robot," Bowtie told FoxNews.com.

If building robots out of spare parts isn’t exactly your specialty, that’s okay. Hackerspaces open their doors to all skill levels.

"When you have all these different people from all these different sectors of society all crossing over in the same space, a lot of really amazing ideas come out," Banno said.

So if you’re looking to make a prototype for your business, or if you just want to let your creative juices flow, find a hackerspace. There’s probably one closer than you think.

Aalia Shaheed is part of the Junior Reporter program at Fox News. Get more information on the program here and follow them on Twitter: @FNCJrReporters