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MiKandi updates porn app to comply with Google Glass policy, but remains banned

  • mikandi-glass-photo.jpg

    A promotional shot for MiKandi's new Google Glass app, which displays pornograph on the futuristic device -- and was promptly banned.MiKandi

  • Google Glass for eyeglass wearers.jpg

    Mark Shand, a Google Glass engineer with a long history in tech, shows off a prototype Google Glass fitted for prescription glasses.Seth Rosenblatt/CNET

  • Google Glass closeup

    The Google.com/glass microsite from the web giant offers specs and images of the forthcoming Google Glass product, such as this one.Google

  • Jeremy Kaplan Google Glass.JPG

    FoxNews.com's Jeremy Kaplan tests Google Glass, a futuristic head-mounted computer that Google hopes will change the world.FoxNews.com / Perry Chiaramonte

The world's first Google Glass pornographers were unable to work around new restrictions banning their app, the company told FoxNews.com Tuesday night -- changes made to the terms of service mere hours after they released their app. 

Seattle company MiKandi released the first pornographic app for Google Glass on Monday, but Google almost immediately changed its policies to outlaw adult content.

MiKandi was apparently unable to work around Google's ban, MiKandi CEO Jesse Adams told FoxNews.com Tuesday evening. 

Adams said they made the necessary changes to comply with Google's policies. However, when the company tried to re-enable the app, MiKandi discovered its user's Glass API limit was still at zero, meaning that the company could not push any updates for the app.

"We called Google to see if this meant that our account was completely blocked, but they refused to give us a clear answer," Adams told FoxNews.com.

The app allows users to share racy content directly with others and browse through adult content using Glass, a wearable computer that developers are currently poking and prodding. MiKandi's app was meant to send alerts about new content directly to a user’s Glass, just like a news app would. But these headlines raised eyebrows and alarm at Google HQ.

'Glass does not allow Glassware content that contains nudity, graphic sexual acts, or sexually explicit material.'

- Google spokesman

“Although the app is still live and people are using it, at this point we must make changes to the app in order to comply with the new policies,” Adams wrote in a company blog post earlier this week.

Google defended the ban, stating that the official policy makes explicit content against the rules.

Our policies make it clear that Glass does not allow Glassware content that contains nudity, graphic sexual acts, or sexually explicit material. Any Glassware that violates this policy will be blocked from appearing on Glass,” a Google spokesman told FoxNews.com.

But that policy wasn’t in place when MiKandi began developing the app, Adams wrote.

“When we received our Glass and started developing our app 2 weeks ago, we went through the policy very carefully to make sure we were developing the app within the terms. We double checked again last week when making the site live on the Internet and available for install for testing during last week’s announcement.”

Google said the policy change was necessary as various usage models arise for Glass.

“Our Explorer Program makes users active participants in evolving Glass ahead of a wider consumer launch. In keeping with this approach, we've updated our developer policies. We look forward to learning more from our users as we update the software and evolve our policies in the weeks and months ahead,” a spokesman said.

Earlier this month, several major adult companies told FoxNews.com they were staying away from Google Glass.

"We've decided to take a wait-and-see approach to Google Glass,” Steven Hirsch, founder and co-chairman of Vivid Entertainment, told FoxNews.com. “We want to see how quickly our target audience chooses to adapt it before we make any decision to move ahead."

And Peter Acworth, CEO of San Francisco-based Kink.com, said the technology “opens up new opportunities.” But his company doesn’t plan to act on that vision: “No explicit plans yet,” Kink’s Michael Stabile told FoxNews.com.