The Iranian government’s investigations into allegations of torture, rape and unlawful killings in the country “seemed to have been more concerned with covering up abuses than getting at the truth,” Amnesty International said Thursday, the Times of London reported.

Amnesty said that the Islamic Republic’s human rights record since the country’s disputed elections in June had proven to be as bad as at any time over the past two decades.

Citing a “climate of impunity” in which Iran’s hardline Basij militia and the Revolutionary Guards suppressed anti-government demonstrations, Amnesty said that the government had “resorted to exceptionally high levels of violence and arbitrary measures to stifle protest and dissent."

“Members of militias and officials who have committed violations must also be promptly held to account and on no account should anyone be executed,” said Hadj Sahraoui, the deputy director of Amnesty’s Middle East and North Africa Program.

One anti-government protester described being locked in a shipping container with 70 other people for 58 days, and told during interrogation that if he did not confess his son would be arrested and raped. He was then beaten until he lost consciousness.

Another former prisoner said that he saw a student, Ali Kheradnejad, “with his clothes ripped and his forehead bloody and later learned that he had died in detention, apparently as a result of torture or other ill-treatment."

Despite the damning testimony, Iran has not only denied the widespread abuse but threatened to crack down even harder on protesters if the mass demonstrations continued.

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