This is a rush transcript from "On the Record," November 17, 2009. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated.

GRETA VAN SUSTEREN, FOX NEWS HOST: Wait until you see what members of Congress are getting. It's pink. And we are told the number is more than 4 million. That's all the clues we are giving you.

South Carolina Senator Jim DeMint will tell you all about it. He went "On the Record".

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

VAN SUSTEREN: Senator, nice to see you, sir.

SEN. JIM DEMINT, R - S.C.: Greta, welcome to my place.

VAN SUSTEREN: Indeed. I see you have some pink slips. What are these pink slips?

DEMINT: Thousands of pink slips coming to the senator's office, congressman's office, telling them we are on notice if we vote for government health care or cap and trade or any more spending, we're fired. And I think it's a great effort.

VAN SUSTEREN: These are actually being mailed to everybody's office?

DEMINT: From all over the country. It's a movement that you got a lot of different names on these things. But people are just signing up on the Web site and the slips go out. And we're collecting them in our office.

But it's just putting everyone on notice. And I think that's what the American people have been doing for several months now is just telling us if we keep spending and borrowing, we're going to get fired.

VAN SUSTEREN: All right. Now, I went on the Web site. I think it's called Sendapinkslip.com and saw how easily you can do it. Are these simples you have got?

DEMINT: They have names on them.

VAN SUSTEREN: They have different names on them?

DEMINT: Yes. When you go on the Web site it puts your name on and it sends it to congressman and senators.

VAN SUSTEREN: Here is Jay Lee from Miami, Florida. Mark Carman from Loveland, Colorado.

DEMINT: We got California, Tennessee, Pennsylvania.

VAN SUSTEREN: Palm Desert, they are from all over.

DEMINT: Yes.

VAN SUSTEREN: Even North Hollywood. That's unusual.

DEMINT: But just getting one pink slip is scary enough, but to get a stack full every day, that's a good message.

VAN SUSTEREN: Are these going to Senator Reid's office?

DEMINT: I sure hope so. I think they are. I think they come to all of us. When you put your name they send it to all the senators. At this point it would just be senators, I think.

VAN SUSTEREN: I actually went on the Web site and paid like a fee, and then once you pay a fee these get blasted out to everybody in the mail.

Well, it's interesting to see how people respond. There may be a big vote this week. What's the big vote?

DEMINT: I'm calling it a shell game, Greta, because they are voting to proceed to a bill, but it's not the real bill. They are going to add the real bill later after we get the final language and the real cost of implementing the Senate version of the plan.

But I want to make sure every American knows whoever votes to proceed to this bill is voting for government-run health care. Some are going to say they are voting to move the debate forward.

VAN SUSTEREN: Is that a lie?

DEMINT: That is a lie. Because once this bill gets on the floor it's almost impossible to stop. So those folks who are voting -- you see, they need 60 votes to proceed to it, but they only 51 to pass it.

So some of those who vote to proceed can say I voted against the final bill. But Americans need to know if whether it's Blanche Lincoln or Evan Bayh, Ben Nelson, if they vote to proceed, they are voting for this bill.

VAN SUSTEREN: I have a big button that says the game is played up here. Like for instance when someone says a bill costs $875 billion, that's because they haven't told us about the side bill which costs $300 billion.

DEMINT: You are right.

VAN SUSTEREN: I like the straight story on all of this. Another one of the things that brought up with one of your colleagues is the Congressional Budget Office that scored Senator Reid's bill, apparently he has not go gotten that score yet.

But I would like to have that number right away, too. And apparently the Senate keeps it a little bit under wraps until you decide to tell us how much it is going to cost us.

DEMINT: We asked Senator Reid to give us a copy of his bill last months when he sent it to the congressional...

VAN SUSTEREN: That's the bill without even a price.

DEMINT: We don't have the bill yet. And he says we are going to have a vote to proceed on it on Friday even though we still don't have the bill. We still don't have the cost. It's going to be another 2,000 page bill, I'm sure. And I hope Americans are going to revolt against this, because...

VAN SUSTEREN: Apparently the pink slips might be evidence some are unhappy.

DEMINT: Yes. We just need to make sure folks know that this is a shell game. Anyone who votes for it is voting to pass government-run health care.

VAN SUSTEREN: You know, it's sort of hard as a citizen to figure out whether it's a good idea or bad idea until we see the cost. And I guess the thing I'm curious about is as soon as the cost is made available to the Senate, since we are all part of this, and we pay your salaries, with all due respect, we ought to get that number, too, so that we can sort of decide whether we want to contact our representatives or not.

DEMINT: You should be able to see the bill.

VAN SUSTEREN: That, too.

DEMINT: And we want the bill read on the floor. We are trying to figure out how to do that. But that could take a month or so reading it during business hours.

But Americans have a right to know what's in the bill and how much it's going to cost, how it will affect their own health plan. Why is it taking $500 billion from Medicare. Seniors are concerned about that.

This is not something we should try to do this weekend, for heaven's sake. Nobody has even seen the bill.

VAN SUSTEREN: Do we sort of taxpayers -- this is when the Republicans are in power, too -- do we sort of get slicked by the procedure that we sort of don't really get what's going on? We don't get like the real story sort of laid out for us? There was a lot of numbers games and votes and everything?

DEMINT: A lot of smoke and mirrors, regardless of which party. I mean, everything is too big and too complex. And I have a whole staff, and half the time I can't figure out all the things that are going on. So, normal people who have real jobs and families, they don't have time to look in on this.

We cannot pass these huge bills like we are doing and expect Americans to believe what we are doing.

VAN SUSTEREN: This is sort of wild, these pink slips. Let me see your stack. That's the sum total of everything you have gotten so far?

DEMINT: No, no, we have gotten a lot more than these.

VAN SUSTEREN: Really? How many have you gotten? That's a lot?

DEMINT: All different names. I don't know. We have gotten thousands, and I hope everyone else has, too. It's a good warning.

VAN SUSTEREN: It's interesting. Well, thank you very much, senator, and good luck, sir.

DEMINT: Thank you, Greta.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

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