Turning the clock back may mean more sleep, but it may mean trouble for your body.

Dr. Atul Malhotra, medical director of the sleep disorders research program in the division of sleep medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, says there are ways to keep the time change from disruption your body clock. explained in a hospital news release that there are ways to prevent the time change from disrupting your sleep habits.

In a news release, Malhotra offered tips for those disrupted by a change in schedule:

- Stay away from caffeine and other stimulants, especially during the days before and after the time shift, and avoid napping for a few days because it can disrupt your sleeping at night.

- Sleep through that extra hour if you can instead of trying to get things done.

- Don't drive if you feel sleepy because of the time shift. Consider taking public transportation for a few days to give your body time to adjust.

- Relax, avoid stress and remember to take your regular medications over the weekend of the time change.

For those who have trouble sleeping overall, Malhotra suggested the following:

- Go to bed and wake up at the same times, even on weekends. No sleeping in.

- Avoid food and drinks with caffeine after lunch, including coffee, tea, soda and chocolate.

- Take 15 to 30 minutes to wind down before heading off to bed.

- Don't work or study right before bedtime, in order to allow yourself to relax.

- Don't exercise strenuously right before bedtime.

- Keep your room dark, quiet and cool; ear plugs and eye masks can help.

- Keep in mind that time in front of screens — the computer or television varieties — before bedtime can disrupt sleep.