The signing of a Palestinian reconciliation agreement set for Oct. 25 has been postponed for "several weeks," Egypt's foreign minister said Sunday.

Ahmed Aboul Gheit wouldn't name the Palestinian faction who requested the delay, but the Islamist Hamas group on its Web site said it was postponing the agreement because of the Palestinian government's withdrawal of support from a report condemning Israeli attacks on Gaza.

Egypt has been working on reconciling the two Palestinian rivals since 2007 so that a unified front can be presented in the stalled peace talks with Israel.

After months of false starts, there finally appeared to be progress last week with the announcement of a reconciliation deal, until Abbas withdrew his support from the U.N.'s Goldstone report.

The Goldstone report accuses Israel of using disproportionate force and failing to protect civilians during its winter assault on Gaza while calling Hamas' firing of rockets at civilian areas in southern Israel a war crime.

The report recommended that the Security Council require both sides to carry out credible investigations into alleged abuses during the conflict — in which 13 Israelis and almost 1,400 Palestinians, including hundreds of civilians, were killed.

Israel has vehemently rejected the war crimes allegations. The U.S. has called the report deeply flawed and said it disagrees with many of its assessments, and Abbas was under pressure from the U.S. to suspend the report.

Abbas' repudiation of the report has been widely condemned by not just Hamas, but many Palestinians as well.

President Barack Obama's Mideast envoy, George Mitchell, met with Egyptian officials, including the foreign minister on Sunday, in an effort to move forward Israeli-Palestinian peace talks.