This is a rush transcript from "Glenn Beck," June 19, 2009. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated.

GLENN BECK, HOST: You know, yesterday on the program, I about to burst a blood vessel when I saw the arrogance of Chris Dodd.

I saw something today — the arrogance of Senator Barbara Boxer that just blew my mind. She was talking to a brigadier general, Michael Walsh, during a meeting of the Environment and Public Works Committee.

I want you to watch this as Senator Boxer — I don't know if you no know this, but our military men are trained to say a ma'am and sir — watch what she did in this:

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

BRIG. GEN. MICHAEL WALSH, U.S. ARMY: Ma'am, at the LACPR is...

SEN. BARBARA BOXER, D-CALIF.: You know, do me a favor. Could you say senator instead of ma'am?

WALSH: Yes.

BOXER: It's just a thing. I've worked so hard to get that title. So, I'd appreciate it. Thank you.

WALSH: Yes, Senator.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

BECK: You've got to be kidding me.

Let me ask you something, Senator: You know how hard the average person is working to bail out your frickin' state? Excuse my language.

Syndicate columnist and author of best-selling book "Guilty": Ann Coulter.

Hi, Ann.

Video: Watch Beck's interview

(LAUGHTER)

ANN COULTER, SYNDICATED COLUMNIST: Hello, sir.

BECK: You were laughing at that. I can't laugh at that anymore. I can't take their arrogance anymore.

COULTER: Well, she did work very hard, as opposed to, you know, brigadier general.

(CROSSTALK)

BECK: Yes, he was just — he was just let in.

COULTER: Well, moreover, this is how, in the military, you speak to superiors.

BECK: Right.

COULTER: You would speak to inferiors by using the rank. You speak to superiors by saying sir or ma'am. So, in addition to being arrogant, she is massively ignorant. And the same thing for the queen, which apparently of what she thinks she is, you start with "her majesty" and then all mentions or all addresses of the queen thereafter are "ma'am."

Can we play that again?

(LAUGHTER)

BECK: You know what? Play this. Go back to what she — how she was addressing Condoleezza Rice, Secretary Rice.

COULTER: Oh yeah, that's a good one.

BECK: Play Secretary Rice, how she was addressing Secretary Rice. Oh, you don't have it? Oh, I thought we had it. I'm sorry.

COULTER: And that was while haranguing Secretary Rice for not having any children. That was the hearing, remember?

BECK: I can't — you know what? Ann, these people are so out of touch.

COULTER: Right.

BECK: So unbelievably out of touch. I hear from listeners who call me all the time and say, "Glenn, they have been saying this for about two years now." Really, they started during the border thing, maybe 2 1/2, three years.

COULTER: Right.

BECK: And they said, "I call my senator or my congressman and they are so rude. And they don't care. They won't listen to me. They won't even treat me with respect."

Did you hear about, what was his, what was his name — senator or Congressman Jim McDermott of Washington State?

COULTER: Yes. Please, please, let's see every one of those e-mails.

BECK: Here come the e-mails.

COULTER: From Liz, a woman named Liz.

BECK: I think she prefers to be called Lizzie.

COULTER: Do you think?

BECK: Yes, Lizzie. Her name is Elizabeth Becton.

Let's start with, just real quick, with the e-mail. This is the first one that came in, it says, "Hey, Liz, hi, Liz, just check in on whether the congressman is available next week. Thanks."

Yada, yada. Now, these are just selected.

The next one came back to that guy, a constituent, the next one came back and said this, "Who is Liz?"

Next, "Elizabeth, I'm so sorry if I offended you. I thought you had gone by Liz at Potlatch. It was my mistake, best."

OK. The next, "Never, I hate that name."

Next, she goes on and on and on — 19 e-mails. Nineteen emails later, she says, "Sounds like you got played by somebody who knows I hate that name and it's a fast way to tick me off. Who told you to go by that name? They are not your friend."

She lectures him in 19 different e-mails. This woman is crazy.

(LAUGHTER)

BECK: She's unstable.

COULTER: Yes, except that that is — this is a large government, any large bureaucracy.

BECK: What would happen to anybody in the private sector?

COULTER: The fact is, well, you can't do that in private practice because there are competitors. This is the problem with huge bureaucracies, whether it's the Soviet Union, Nazi Germany, big governments in Washington. I'm not saying this is Nazi Germany.

BECK: That's all people will report.

(CROSSTALK)

COULTER: But I'm saying, a big government bureaucracy, big business bureaucracies are bad, but ultimately, you have the competition. And I just — I keep hearing these stories and keep thinking of the lines from the Scalia opinion: This is why Lord Acton did not say power tends to purify.

Why are you handing me cookies?

BECK: Cookie dough.

(LAUGHTER)

BECK: This just makes perfect sense to everybody at home, here on "The Glenn Beck Program." Cookie dough. Do you eat cookie dough raw?

COULTER: Yes, but not on TV.

(LAUGHTER)

BECK: What's the difference?

COULTER: You know you're not on radio now...

(CROSSTALK)

BECK: It doesn't matter. By the way, we are not supposed to eat Toll House cookies. I'm just taste testing. This is a public service for you. Public service...

COULTER: Is this placement for ad dollars?

BECK: No, it's not. Come on.

COULTER: No way.

(LAUGHTER)

BECK: Have one cookie dough.

COULTER: I am not eating cookie dough on TV.

BECK: Come on. Come on.

COULTER: I don't even eat it back in the green room or...

BECK: You won't?

COULTER: No, not until after the show.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTER: And someday, you're going to have a big...

(LAUGHTER)

BECK: I know, I've already have that. That was like in the first week...

COULTER: We just moved on from this massive government arrogance...

BECK: I know, I can't take it anywhere.

COULTER: ...from young Liz — Lizzie.

BECK: Or Lizzie. Beth, she might like can we call her Beth, Bethie, Betty?

COULTER: I keep guessing you lead astray by people who hate you to trick you into calling her Beth, when everyone knows — it also reminds me, I'm so glad feminists have gotten so many women into the workplace.

BECK: I know. It's great. OK. Ann, will you do a favor?

COULTER: Yes.

BECK: I want you to read this. It's book, "Common Sense." It hammers the Republicans...

COULTER: Inspired by Thomas Paine.

BECK: It hammers Republicans as much as the Democrats. And I would love to hear your comments on it. See what I mean?

COULTER: I'm just saying there's a lot...

BECK: "Common Sense," just read it.

COULTER: ...of problems with Republicans. But do not tell me they are the same with the Democrats. That's what I'm saying.

BECK: Read it, read it, read it.

COULTER: That only someone who eats cookie dough on TV could say that.

BECK: That's right. That's right.

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