Earlier this month, the U.S. Department of Justice said the State of Georgia cannot check driver’s licenses and Social Security numbers to verify the citizenship of prospective voters. The concern was that Georgia’s policy was discriminatory toward minority voters. According to a FOX News/Opinion Dynamics poll released Friday, most Americans disagree with the Justice Department ruling.

When it comes to showing photo identification at a polling place before voting, 83 percent of Americans say they think it is a good idea to require it, because it helps avoid fraud. Only 15 percent of Americans agree with the Justice Department that such a policy is a bad idea.

Click here to see the full poll results.

This sentiment is spread across party lines, with large majorities of Republicans (92 percent), Democrats (76 percent) and independents (84 percent) agreeing with a policy that requires voters to show photo ID before voting.

Those most likely to think that the policy is a bad idea include blacks (23 percent), low income voters (22 percent) and liberal voters (22 percent).

Even more Americans agree that people should be required to show photo ID or a Social Security card to prove U.S. citizenship before registering to vote, with fully 91 percent believing it should be a requirement.

Again, there is overwhelming support for such a policy across party lines, with almost all Republicans (94 percent), Democrats (89 percent) and independents (90 percent) in favor.

While the Help America Vote Act (HAVA) requires first time voters, who register by mail, to show photo ID before voting, there are currently 24 states that have more stringent requirements than HAVA. Of these states, only seven require all voters to show photo ID before voting. The remaining 17 will accept some forms of non-photo ID.

Opinion Dynamics Corp. conducted the national telephone poll of 900 registered voters for FOX News from June 9 to June 10. The poll has a 3-point error margin.

Click here for the raw data.