Men are almost 40 percent more likely than women to die from cancer because they don't like going to the doctor and have unhealthy lifestyles, according to new research.

They are also around 70 percent more likely to die from cancers that affect both men and women, such as stomach, liver and kidney cancer.

Men are also far more likely to develop the disease in the first place.

The findings are part of a new report from the U.K.'s National Cancer Intelligence Network, Cancer Research U.K. and the Men's Health Forum.

There is "no known biological reason" why men should be more likely to develop cancer and die, the researchers said.

But they suggested "stereotypical" male behaviors — such as downplaying early symptoms, not visiting the doctor and having unhealthier lifestyles — could be to blame.

"Men have a reputation for having a 'stiff upper lip' and not being as health-conscious as women,” Professor David Forman, information lead for the NCIN said.

"What we see from this report could be a reflection of this attitude, meaning men are less likely to make lifestyle changes that could reduce their risk of the disease and less likely to go to their doctor with cancer symptoms."

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