Anti-Clotting Drug Made From Milk of Goats Gets Closer to Government Approval

In a scientific first, an anti-clotting drug made from the milk of genetically engineered goats is moving closer to government approval for humans.

An evaluation by the Food and Drug Administration released Wednesday says the medication works and its safety is acceptable.

Called ATryn, the drug is intended to help people with a rare hereditary disorder that makes them vulnerable to life-threatening blood clots.

Its approval would be a major step toward new kinds of medications made not from chemicals, but from living organisms genetically manipulated by scientists. Similar drugs could be available in the next few years for a range of human ailments, including hemophilia.

ATryn is made by Massachusetts-based GTC Biotherapeutics.