The 10 men known to have carried out the Mumbai terror attacks were part of a larger cadre of 30 who were given military training on how to conduct a suicide mission, according to police.

"Another 20 were trained in the same way," Deven Bharti, Mumbai Police Deputy Commissioner, told The Times. "We suspect they were being trained for similar missions. This is a worry for all parts of the world, these men could strike in any one of several countries," he said.

The whereabouts of the 20 other men are unknown.

The news came after the Indian government demanded that Jamaat-ud-Dawa, a charity linked to the Pakistan-based terror group Lashkar-e-Taiba, which Indian officials say was responsible for the Mumbai strike, be added to a U.N. terrorism blacklist.

"We have requested the Security Council to proscribe the Pakistani group Jamaat-ud-Dawa since it is a terrorist outfit," E. Ahamed, Indian minister of state for external affairs, told a special meeting of the U.N. Security Council on terrorism.

Pakistan's U.N. Ambassador Abdullah Hussain Haroon told the council Islamabad was ready to support such a measure.

There have been fears that more militants were on the loose since the terror attacks on India's commercial capital on Nov. 26, which killed 171 people.

Police sources had earlier said that 24 terrorists received the same training – which included weapons handling and marine warfare drills – as the Mumbai gunmen in camps in Pakistan. They have now increased the number.

Indian officials allege that the camps were run by Lashkar-e-Taiba, which was founded to fight Indian rule in Kashmir.

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