Nearly seven decades have passed since 89-year-old Dallas Harvey witnessed the horrific attack at Pearl Harbor, but the brutal images remain emblazoned in his memory as if not a day had gone by.

In an interview with the Telegraph.com, Harvey — who was a 21-year-old medic on the USS Argonne repair ship on the day of the attack on Dec. 7, 1941 — spoke of a harbor full of black smoke and chaos aboard the ships.

“The water was burning, the oil had spilled out from the ships and it looked like the whole harbor was on fire,” Harvey said.

Click here to see photos of the attack.

“Three planes that I recall came over and dropped bombs on the naval air station on a small island in the bay … the third plane flew over our ship, then I saw the red dots (of the Japanese sun insignia) on the wings,” and learned that the attackers were from Japan, Harvey told the Telegraph.

"I was almost positive we would be prisoners by nightfall," Harvey told the Telegraph.

He added that he suppressed many painful memories from the surprise morning attack by the Japanese in Hawaii, including the grim task of unloading hundreds of bodies from the destroyed ships onto the dock.

“I blocked that part out until 50 years later, when I went to the 50-year reunion … I had a total blackout.”

Harvey, one of the last living survivors of the attack that killed 2,402 and wounded 1,282, says he bears no ill will toward the Japanese. He retired from the Navy after 30 years of service and lives with his family in Southern Illinois, according to the Telegraph.

Click here to read the full interview with Dallas Harvey at the Telegraph.com.