Can you imagine being lost in your own home? It’s a reality for a Canadian woman who suffers from a rare disorder.

Sharon Roseman, 61, has a brain malfunction called topographical disorder, which is the inability to find one's way through a familiar environment, The Province reported.

As a child, Roseman couldn't find her way downstairs.

"The neighborhood wasn't there. I didn't recognize my own back yard," she told the newspaper.

Even now, Roseman still struggles.

"It's like somebody picks up the whole world and sets it back down at a 90-degree angle," she said.

It was previously thought the condition was the result of a brain injury – but researchers at the University of British Columbia have documented the first cases of naturally-occurring topographical disorders.

They have been closely monitoring Roseman’s case.

"It's really devastating,” researcher Giuseppe Iaria told The Province. “They don't go out. They can't ask for directions because they're not able to follow directions. They cannot form a mental map in their brains," he said.

Iaria believes many people suffer from this rare condition.

Click here to read more from The Province.