When Hip-Hop and Politics Collide

By

Published August 01, 2008

| FoxNews.com

Ever since Ice-T launched this rap music craze with his hit song, "The Message," I've been a dedicated fan of the lively genre. So it pains me to see the depths Ludacris has sunk in order to rehabilitate his increasingly irrelevant celebrity.

But here's the real issue: How do you come down on this guy without sounding like an old man waving a cane at a bus? That's the challenge everyone — not just the candidates — faces whenever pop culture vomits something that makes everyone feel gross.

That "feel gross" moment occurs when Ludacris raps, "McCain don't belong in any chair unless he's paralyzed." Because we live in a world where hipness trumps all, most critics end up sounding like the E! network writer Gina Serpe, who labeled the song "well-meaning." I wonder what she would consider mean-spirited.

Oh wait, I know.

Let's state the obvious: If it was a white, pro-McCain rapper and the paralysis joke was directed at Obama, the world would have imploded. But that sort of thing never happens, mainly because there's no such thing as a white, pro-McCain rapper and conservatives rarely wish ill-will on their political adversaries. That's because, to them, good and evil is more important than left and right.

On the progressive side, though, it's this simple: If you don't agree with me, then you're evil and you should die. This happens so regularly, that it has turned me into a broken record, pointing out all the examples of bloggers gleefully chirping over croaking right-wingers. Crap, I'm even getting tired of me.

Anyway, I'd probably wish these losers some sort of physical calamity, but instead I'll just return to my study and listen to my hip hop. I just purchased something by this fellow Tupac Shakur. I think he's really going places!

And if you disagree with me, then you sir are worse than Hitler!

Greg Gutfeld hosts "Red Eye with Greg Gutfeld" weekdays at 3 a.m. ET. Send your comments to: redeye@foxnews.com

URL

http://www.foxnews.com/story/2008/08/01/when-hip-hop-and-politics-collide