Dutch politician Geert Wilders was charged by a Jordanian prosecutor Tuesday with blasphemy and contempt of Muslims for making an anti-Koran film, and ordered to stand trial in Jordan, Reuters reported.

The charges came one day after Dutch prosecutors decided they wouldn't take action against Wilders because he was protected by the right to free speech.

An order was issued to bring Wilders to trial through the Dutch Embassy in Amman, Reuters reported.

Wilders' film "Fitna," which appeared on the Internet on March 27, linked terror attacks by Muslim extremists to texts from the Koran, Islam's holy book.

The Organization of the Islamic Conference, a league of 56 Muslim nations, said it was "deeply annoyed" by the Dutch decision, Reuters reported.

"The decision ... encourages and supports the irresponsible defamatory style followed by some media outlets and instigates feelings of hatred, animosity and antipathy towards Muslims," the Saudi Arabia-based organization said in a statement, according to Reuters.

The film set off protests in Pakistan, Malaysia and Indonesia and led to calls in other countries for a boycott of Dutch goods after its release.

The Dutch government has said it disagrees with the tone of the film, but says Wilders has a constitutional right to air his views. The U.N. secretary-general and U.N. agencies have condemned the film. EU foreign ministers have also rejected Wilders' views.

The charges carry a maximum sentence of three years in jail, Reuters reported.

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