The Bush administration moved Monday to impose financial sanctions against a Philippines-based group, its leader and other members accused of terrorist acts.

The action against the Rajah Solaiman Movement, its leader Ahmad Santos and other alleged members means that any bank accounts or other financial assets found in this country that belong to them must be frozen. Americans also are prohibited from doing business with them.

The Treasury Department said the group, also known as RSM, has received training, money and operational assistance from al-Qaida linked terror organizations including Jemaah Islamiyah and the Abu Sayyaf Group. The government said RSM members were involved in carrying out terrorist activities in the Philippines as well as plots to bomb high-profile targets including Manila public utilities, tourist areas and the U.S. Embassy in Manila.

"The leader and members of the Rajah Solaiman Movement are responsible for reprehensible acts that include killing citizens and tourists in the Philippines to advance their terrorist agenda,' said Adam Szubin, director of Treasury's Office of Foreign Assets Control.

The government said RSM has provided "field operatives and a pool of potential recruits" to Abu Sayyaf Group and Jemaah Islamiyah, "enabling them to expand their reach into the urban areas of the Philippines."

Treasury said RSM "reportedly received funding from private Saudi sources that channeled funds" through charitable non-governmental organizations in the Philippines. Between 2002 and 2005, Saudi financiers and at least one Saudi-based Filipino financier also contributed money to RSM for training camps and planned terror operations, the government alleged.

The other members designated: Pio Abogne de Vera; Redendo Cain Dellosa; Feliciano Semborio Delos Reyes Jr.; Ricardo Perez Ayeras; Ruben Pestano Lavilla Jr. ; and Dinno Amor Rosalejos Pareja.