The British man accused of fatally shooting his wife and infant daughter broke down and cried Thursday as prosecutors showed jurors a videotape of the bodies laying cuddled together in bed.

Neil Entwistle covered his mouth and eyes and sobbed during the 20-minute video, taken by State Police investigators, that showed his 27-year-old wife, Rachel, and their 9-month-old daughter, Lillian Rose, dead of gunshot wounds in the master bedroom of their rented home in Hopkinton.

The only sound that could be heard in the courtroom as the video began was the classical music still playing in the baby's nearby bedroom when police found the bodies. Entwistle's mother, Yvonne, began sobbing audibly after seeing her son break down. She was comforted by Entwistle's father, Clifford, and brother, Russell, who also cried.

Rachel's mother, Priscilla Matterazzo, and her stepfather, Joseph Matterazzo, held hands as they sat in the front row across the courtroom from the Entwistles.

The video could not be seen by spectators, including the Entwistles and Matterazzos, because two television monitors were turned toward the jury and away from the gallery. Entwistle, his attorneys and prosecutors watched the video from another monitor across the room.

Before the video was played, Judge Diane Kottmyer warned jurors it would show the bodies, but told them to put aside any sympathy or emotions and instead evaluate the video using "reason and judgment."

State police Sgt. Mary Ritchie testified that the video showed the bodies as they were discovered by police on Jan. 22, 2006. Ritchie said Rachel Entwistle was found lying on her side, with her right arm draped across the baby's chest.

An autopsy showed Rachel died of a gunshot wound to the head, while Lillian died from a gunshot to the chest.

Prosecutors allege Entwistle killed his wife and child in January 2006 because he was deep in debt and dissatisfied with his sex life. He was arrested three weeks later in London.

Entwistle, 29, told state police he discovered the bodies after returning home from running errands the morning of Jan. 20, 2006. He said he returned to England the next day — without calling police — because he wanted to be consoled by his parents, who live in Worksop, England.