A baby who suffered a severe allergic reaction to a leather sofa has still not fully recovered from the ordeal three months later.

Within one hour of being laid fully clothed on the leather couch, six-month-old Charlie Mather was rushed to hospital with severe burns, rashes and sores that covered almost his entire body.

He spent one week in the hospital, said his mother, Danielle, and when he was allowed home, doctors gave her eight different creams to apply to his body each day.

Now, three months later, Charlie, of Leeds, West York, England, is still affected, his mother said.

"Without being able to use his hands (which are bandaged) he can’t play or learn how to pick things up. It is heartbreaking as a mother to watch him struggle," Mather said.

Hundreds of other consumers have reported similar burns from contaminated sofas, which were made by a Chinese firm, Linkwise, and are thought to contain a chemical fungicide.

"I am convinced that the sofa is responsible for what happened and the only way to prove it is to do an independent test," Mather said.

But Homebase, who sold the sofa to Mather, said it was safe at the time of sale.

"The Troy range of furniture is not adversely affected by any problems that may have been identified in other sofa products sold in the UK," said a spokesperson for the store.

"Her suite was manufactured in the UK and not manufactured by the company reported to be associated with these products."