When it comes to dressing for an interview, it's not necessarily a fashion do to arrive in a suit. However, as you saw in our video, Dress for Success, there are some rules to looking sophisticated when trying to land a new job. Read on for tips on how to dress, plus details on the looks you saw in the video.

Pack lightly.
The key to looking professional is dressing neatly and avoiding anything distracting or negatively memorable. A top HR exec at News Corp said that arriving with anything more than a purse or briefcase is a definite don't. For great styles try coach.com and bananarepublic.com.

Dress neatly.
Avoid wearing anything that gives a cluttered or messy appearance. This includes rolled up sleeves, wrinkled shirts and beat-up, un-shined shoes. Hit your local shoe shine to spruce up the pair you have or invest in something new. Just remember, when it comes to your shoes, quality is important!

Use good judgment.
This is an interview, not a date and you want to dress conservatively. Watch for clothing that is too revealing like low cut or tight tops, and high cut skirts or anything that pulls. Make sure your shirt is a good fit.

Research the environment.
Dr. Cynthia Strite, a career and executive coach affiliated with fiveoclockclub.com, said the most important thing is to spend a little time learning about the industry or company you're interviewing with. For example, if you are interviewing for a job in the television industry many people dress casually whereas in finance, men and women are often still wearing suits. If your interview is for a fashion-related position you may require a trendier outfit. And in that case, click on the style guide for the latest spring trends!

Dress up a level.
Cynthia's rule is to take it up a notch. Wear an outfit that is one or two levels more formal than the office dress code.

Style Guide Fit Tips:
• Pants should always hit ½ way down your heel no matter where you're interviewing.
• Two or three buttons jackets are fine depending on your preference.
• Skirt lengths should be at or ½ an inch above your knee, no shorter.


Don't forget: an interview is not the time to make a personal statement with your wardrobe.
Special thanks to:
Dr. Cynthia Strite, career and executive coach, affiliated with the fiveoclockclub.com.