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Laura Bush and Troy Aikman at White House Easter Egg Roll

This is a rush transcript from "On the Record ," March 24, 2008. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated.

GRETA VAN SUSTEREN, HOST: Just a few hours ago we were at the White House for their annual Easter egg roll, a tradition dating back to 1878. The First Lady Laura Bush was a gracious host to thousands of children and, yes, the parents.

Video: Watch Greta's interview

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

LAURA BUSH, FIRST LADY OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA: When you hear the whistle, then you need to be ready to start moving your eggs. Are you ready? On your mark, get set — are you ready?

VAN SUSTEREN: We have a star studded cast here. I see your daughter is here. The former First Lady is here. The Easter Bunny.

Explain the Easter egg roll to me.

BUSH: The Easter egg roll — you use a spoon, and these are hard-boiled eggs, and the White House chefs spend all of the weekend hard boiling eggs and dying them.

So the idea is you're down close to the ground with your spoon and you're moving the Easter egg all the way down to the finish line. And, of course, everyone is a winner at the Easter egg roll.

VAN SUSTEREN: This tradition has been going on for how long?

BUSH: I think it was 1858 that the first Easter egg roll was here on the south lawn. And before that children would play on the Capitol grounds, and the Congress doesn't like all the smashed eggs. So they sent them over here, and Rutherford B. Hayes opened up the house for the Easter egg roll.

Good morning. Wake up sleepy head and be careful where you step.

VAN SUSTEREN: There is reading?

BUSH: There is reading. I read "Arthur meets the President", Martin Brown's book about Arthur. And Arthur was with me. He was standing behind me, the character.

The whistle blows and they're off.

VAN SUSTEREN: Have you ever tried this, by the way?

BUSH: I'm way too tall now. I think it works best when you're as tall as that little boy is.

VAN SUSTEREN: And your daughter read her book?

BUSH: Jenna read her book. And Barbara Bush is here, and she read a book. And then we have a lot of very distinguished readers.

VAN SUSTEREN: And, of course, that falls into the literacy campaign that both you and Mrs. Bush —

BUSH: That's right.

"Bad dog," said Arthur. "Look at what he did."

This is a very fun and happy tradition on the White House long.

VAN SUSTEREN: You're one of the hosts? You brought a crew.

TROY AIKMAN, FORMER NFL QUARTERBACK: My girls are here. This is the first time that we have been here for this, this is great.

VAN SUSTEREN: Did you read?

AIKMAN: I did.

VAN SUSTEREN: What did you read?

AIKMAN: Let me get this right: Dr. Seuss. It's a tongue twister. One fish, two fish, red fish, blue fish. It's a great bedtime story because it puts kids to sleep. I didn't realize this early in the day it would put these kids to sleep, but it did.

VAN SUSTEREN: Did your children participate in the roll at all?

AIKMAN: They didn't. They didn't do any face painting either, but the day is young.

VAN SUSTEREN: Have you been inside the White House?

AIKMAN: I have.

VAN SUSTEREN: Have you been there before?

AIKMAN: We were fortunate to come after some of our Super Bowl wins, which was great. And this is the first time here for this event, and the first time here to the White House since the Bush administration took over.

VAN SUSTEREN: You mention the Super Bowls. Full disclosure: I own one share in the Green Bay Packers.

AIKMAN: How do you feel about losing Brett Favre? Is that stock worth much?

VAN SUSTEREN: It's very disappointing for us. In fact, I read that you think he may come back.

AIKMAN: I don't really think he'll really come back. I know he will be tempted to come back because he is still a great player, and, as we know, there are a lot of teams that could use a quarterback. So I wouldn't be surprised if he did come back and play.

VAN SUSTEREN: Is it hard to make that decision, retiring? We watched you for years playing for the Cowboys. Is it as tough as it seems?

AIKMAN: It's hard because it's what we have been doing since we were many of the kids' ages that were here — seven, eight-year-old — you start playing football, and it's all you really know. And then the football season rolls around, and you get ready and go play.

And then to all of a sudden have that taken away from you, it's hard. It's very hard.

And we all like to think that we're prepared to announce that we're not going to play any longer; but, I know it was emotional for me and I know it was emotional for Brett, as it is for most people, and that is why I think the tug will be there for him to maybe want to come back and play.

VAN SUSTEREN: What are you doing?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The theme this year is ocean conservation. What Sylvia(ph) and I do is I'm the artist, she is the scientist for oceans. And we're trying to inspire kids to get involved, and by painting the ocean and the beautiful animals of the sea, they begin to appreciate them, right Sylvia?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Right. And to bring the kid out in everybody.

VAN SUSTEREN: That is fun. There is a lot of energy here. Who thinks that how exciting it would be painting on the White House grounds? That's fun.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: When I was a kid growing up, to ever think that I would be painting here at the White House — they're just watching that I don't paint on the walls.

VAN SUSTEREN: Nobody has asked me to paint yet, I've noticed.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: You can paint a fish on here — would you do it? Add a little starfish.

Everybody — how about it for Greta.

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