Stiffed by their superstar brother Michael and plagued by decades of bad fiscal decisions, the once-mighty Jackson family is barely scraping by, with one brother stocking groceries, another repairing cars and others living at home with mom while hoping for sister Janet's next handout.

They have fallen far from their days as sequin-studded stage stars who could rake in seven-figure paydays for a single performance. Then they were the Jackson Five, the undisputed kings of Motown, a Berry Gordy-led, bell-bottomed global phenomenon.

Their first four singles rocketed to the top of the charts, four albums went platinum, and the band of brothers sold more than 100 million albums, second only to the Beatles, while pioneering a multimedia empire that spanned radio, TV, cartoons and magazines.

But in a series of interviews with three of the nine Jackson children, two relatives and a current and former employee — over the last three years and as recently as last week — the New York Post learned in stunning detail just how down and out the Jacksons are.

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