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O.J. Simpson Accused of Violating Bail, Returns to Jail

O.J. Simpson returned to jail on Friday, where he will spend several days before a judge hears allegations that he violated terms of his bail in an armed robbery case here, officials said.

This story was broke exclusively by FOX News' Adam Housley.

Click here to read Adam Housely's blog.

Clark County District Attorney David Roger alleges that in a November voice message, Simpson told his bail bondsman to contact co-defendant Clarence "C.J." Stewart and express frustration about testimony given at the hearing where Simpson, Stewart and a third man were ordered to stand trial.

"I just want, want C.J. to know that ... I'm tired of this (expletive)," Simpson is quoted as saying in a transcript that was included in Roger's motion to revoke bail, filed Friday. "Fed up with (expletive) changing what they told me. All right?"

Simpson had been instructed by Las Vegas Justice of the Peace Joe M. Bonaventure in September not to have any contact with anyone involved in the case — not even by "carrier pigeon."

Simpson's lawyer denied the allegations.

"O.J. did not try to persuade anybody to contact a witness," Yale Galanter told The Associated Press.

Simpson flew to Las Vegas on a commercial flight from Miami in the custody of his bail bondsman. The bail bond company revoked the former football great's bond, said Officer Ramon Denby, a Las Vegas police spokesman.

Simpson was freed Sept. 19 on $125,000 bail following his arrest on allegations he and several friends burst into a Las Vegas hotel room and robbed two sports memorabilia dealers at gunpoint.

Simpson has maintained that he was retrieving items that belonged to him. He and the two other men are scheduled to stand trial April 7.

Simpson is set to appear for a court hearing Wednesday on Roger's request to revoke Simpson's bail and keep him jailed until trial.

The prosecutor alleges that Simpson left the voice message with bail bondsman Miguel Pereira for Stewart on Nov. 16, two days after Bonaventure ruled that Simpson, Stewart and Charles Ehrlich should stand trial on 12 charges, including kidnapping and armed robbery.

Roger's three-page motion alleges Simpson "committed new crimes," without providing details or elaboration. Dan Kulin, a spokesman for Roger, declined to say whether new charges would be filed against Simpson.

Galanter said he believed the "new crimes" referred to allegations of witness tampering. Galanter called Pereira a member of Simpson's defense team, and said he was "totally miffed" by the effort to use a tape of a permissible phone call to try to revoke Simpson's bail.

"He was clearly voicing frustration to a member of the defense team who had been providing security, transportation and investigation services," he said.

Galanter said Simpson stayed at Pereira's home during the preliminary hearing, but said he thought the bondsman apparently changed sides.

"He is clearly now a witness for the prosecution," Galanter said of Pereira. He said he intended to question the bondsman under oath Wednesday regarding the telephone message and how the tape recording came to be turned over to prosecutors.

Pereira did not respond to messages seeking comment. A bail bondsman at his business, You Ring We Spring bail bonds in North Las Vegas, declined immediate comment.

Stewart's lawyer, Jose Pallares, said Friday he had no knowledge that Simpson's message ever got to Stewart.

Simpson, Stewart and Ehrlich each pleaded not guilty Nov. 28 to kidnapping, armed robbery, assault with a deadly weapon, burglary, coercion and conspiracy charges. A kidnapping conviction could bring a life sentence with the possibility of parole. An armed robbery conviction carries mandatory prison time.

Three other former co-defendants, Walter Alexander, Michael McClinton and Charles Cashmore, agreed to plea deals and testified against Simpson at the evidentiary hearing in Las Vegas.

Simpson has maintained that no guns were displayed during the confrontation, that he never asked anyone to bring guns and that he did not know anyone had guns. He has said he intended only to retrieve items that had been stolen from him by a former agent, including the suit he wore the day he was acquitted of murder in 1995 in the slayings of his wife, Nicole Brown Simpson, and her friend, Ronald Goldman.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.