Golden Globe-nominated actors are expected to snub the awards in support of striking Hollywood writers, the actors union said Friday.

After canvassing nominees over the past several weeks, Screen Actors Guild President Alan Rosenberg said in a statement, "there appears to be unanimous agreement that these actors will not cross" the picket lines to present or accept an award.

It was unclear how the move might affect the awards set for broadcast on NBC on Jan. 13.

Michael Russell, a spokesman for the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, which stages the Golden Globes, did not immediately return telephone or e-mail requests for comment about the move by actors.

The Writers Guild of America had refused to grant a waiver to allow its members to work on the Globes, the People's Choice Awards and the prestigious Academy Awards.

A total of 72 actors are among this year's Golden Globe nominees. The Hollywood Foreign Press Association has repeatedly tried to seek the blessing of the writers guild.

The actors' union said previously that the choice to attend or not was a personal one that its members would make for themselves.

In his statement Friday, Rosenberg referred to "considerable outreach" by the actors guild to nominees and their representatives in recent weeks.

The writers strike, which began Nov. 5, has broad implications for the way Hollywood does business, since whatever deal is struck by writers on payment for shows offered on the Internet could affect talks with actors and directors, whose contracts expire next June.

Rosenberg also weighed in on the late-night talks shows, which are back on the air. Some are working without writers after failing to strike deals with the writers guild.

Rosenberg stopped short of pressing actors to skip the picketed shows, like Jay Leno's "Tonight."

"We urge our members to appear on the two programs that have independent agreements with the WGA, `The Late Show with David Letterman' and `Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson,"' he said.

Actors who appear on other shows have to cross picket lines, he said.

That creates "the same situation that has led to the consensus among actors to skip the Golden Globes," Rosenberg said.