A judge ruled against former police officer Drew Peterson's request Monday to get his 11 guns, two cars and computers back after investigators seized them in connection to this disappearance of his wife.

Peterson, a suspect in the disappearance of his 23-year-old wife Stacy, wants his items returned but won't see them anytime soon.

The judge will reconsider Peterson's request at a January hearing.

"Forensics are very intricate, detailed," Joel Brodsky, Drew Peterson's attorney, told The Associated Press after a five-minute hearing. "It's only been seven weeks and we're happy the judge is going to keep a leash on them."

Stacy was reported missing on Oct. 29 after she failed to show up at a friend's house. Drew Peterson has denied any involvement in her disappearance, but police have named him a suspect.

Peterson will get his iPod and music CDs back on Jan. 1. Another hearing to review the return of more items is scheduled for Jan. 21.

Meanwhile, Peterson's lawyer wants a special prosecutor to review leaks from a grand jury.

Details from unnamed sources have leaked out of a Will County grand jury reviewing the investigation. Joel Brodsky, Peterson's attorney, says he wants a judge to appoint a special prosecutor to find out the source of the leaks.

Click here for the video report at MyFOXChicago.com.

Click here to visit Drew Peterson's Web site.

Click here to visit Stacy Peterson's Web site.

A recent report found that Peterson transferred nearly a quarter of a million dollars to his son in November, weeks after the disappearance of his wife, according to MyFOXChicago.com.

Prosecutors subpoenaed bank records that show Drew Peterson funneled the money to his son, Steve Peterson, an Oak Brook, Ill., police officer, after Stacy Peterson was reported missing on Oct. 28.

Steve Peterson has testified twice before a grand jury investigating the disappearance of Stacy Peterson, a mother of two, but he declined to comment on the financial transactions.

Sources said Drew Peterson, 58, transferred to Steve Peterson nearly $250,000 from several bank accounts, including joint accounts he held with his wife. He reportedly wrote as many as six checks, with one for more than $150,000, investigators said.

Drew Peterson declined to comment but his attorney, Joel Brodsky, said, "I’m sure if that’s true, and I don’t even know whether or not it is, I’m sure that there are legitimate reasons for it."

The Associated Press contributed to this report.