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Drew Peterson finally got his wish. Privacy. Well, at least a taste of it. For a few moments today, the most closely scrutinized cul-de-sac in America in the last two weeks took on the look of any other upper middle class neighborhood, with its wide sidewalks and well manicured lawns. No satellite trucks. No roving packs of camera crews. No traffic.

So, where did everyone go? Somewhere else. It’s not as if anyone is about to let go of this story. No way. No chance. Instead, one of the many twists of this story took priority this morning. And so, instead of staking out the Peterson house, the media crammed into a parking lot about 30 minutes away from here in Hillside, Ill. That’s where the body of Kathleen Savio rested undisturbed for three-and-a-half years … until now.

They may dig up plenty of bodies on the TV show CSI, but in the real world, it doesn’t happen often. In fact, County State Attorney James Glascow, says in his nearly 30 years of representing the state, this is the first exhumation he’s ever dealt with. And, he had to get court permission before Savio’s resting place could be dug up.

The build-up was much more dramatic than the exhumation itself. The news media was kept out of the cemetery. Chopper shots, however, showed a white casket pulled from the ground, so that it could be transported to the Will County Morgue for a second autopsy later today.

Prior to today, Kathleen Savio’s nephew, Charlie Doman, had told me that the hoped the exhumation would take place at night, so that the family could be afforded some measure of privacy. So after local news and cable channels showed coverage of the exhumation, Doman was none too pleased. “Tasteless and wrong,” he called it. He said the family got no advance warning from the county coroner about this, that Henry Savio, his uncle and Kathleen’s brother, got a call from the State’s Attorney this morning informing him that things were about to get underway. This upset the family, all of whom wanted to be there. I was told a Roman Catholic priest was on hand and said a brief prayer and that gave Charlie some measure of comfort.

It seemed to take less than a half hour to dig up Savio’s body. I imagine it won’t be long now before the media returns to the Peterson house in Bolingbrook, where I’ve been all morning, trying to respectfully keep my distance from this very personal chapter of a twisted saga.

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E-mail Jeff Goldblatt

Jeff Goldblatt is a Chicago based reporter for FOX News Channel. Click over to read more of his bio.