A timeline of some of the events leading up to and following the April 16 shooting spree at Virginia Tech, where student Seung-Hui Cho killed 32 people and himself:

— Fall 2005: English professor Lucinda Roy alerts university officials about Cho's disturbing creative writings, which have alarmed her and students.

— November and December 2005: Two women complain to campus police that they have been harassed by Cho, but they consider his behavior annoying, not threatening. Neither presses charges.

— Dec. 13, 2005: Cho's suitemate calls police to report that Cho seems suicidal. Cho is temporarily detained at Carilion St. Albans Behavioral Center near Radford, Va.

— Dec. 14, 2005: A special justice rules that Cho is a danger to himself, but not others, and orders him to receive outpatient mental health treatment.

— Spring 2006: Cho writes an essay for a fiction class about a young man who hates students at his school and plans to kill them and himself.

— April 14, 2007: Someone sees a suspicious male wearing a hooded sweatshirt in Norris Hall. Another person sees at least one of the classroom building's exterior doors chained shut.

— April 16, 2007: Cho kills two students at 7:15 a.m. in a dormitory. More than two hours later he kills 30 others and himself inside Norris Hall, where he had chained several exit doors shut.

— April 19, 2007: Gov. Timothy Kaine appoints an independent panel to look into the shootings and how authorities handled them. The eight-member panel is led by former Virginia State Police superintendent Gerald Massengill and includes former Homeland Security Secretary Tom Ridge.

— June 11, 2007: Families of some of the Virginia Tech victims demand representation on the panel, saying they feel ostracized from the investigation. They are later denied representation, but Kaine asks that panel member Carroll Ann Ellis, a victim advocate, serve as a liaison to the families.

— July 18, 2007: Family members of several victims attend another panel meeting and plead with panel members to assign accountability for the tragedy. They also ask for a federal commission to be appointed.

— Aug. 22, 2007: Virginia Tech releases the findings of its own internal review of the shootings, and recommends more monitoring of troubled students, locks on classroom doors and other security measures.

— Aug. 24, 2007: The governor's panel holds final a closed-door meeting to put finishing touches on its report.

— Aug. 29, 2007: The panel releases its report, concluding that Virginia Tech officials might have saved lives if they had notified faculty and students sooner about the first two shootings. It also criticizes school officials for not addressing Cho's mental problems.