The Bush administration announced a plan to screen non-profit and charity workers to check for ties to terror, the Washington Post reported.

The targets include thousands who work for organizations that receive U.S. Agency for International Development funds.

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Under the plan, organizations would be mandated to hand over to the government workers’ names, addresses, dates and places of birth, citizenship, Social Security and passport numbers, sex and profession or other employment data.

Click here to read story in Washington Post.

The data information "will be used to conduct national security screening" to make sure the workers do not have ties to entities or individuals "associated with terrorism" or "deemed to be a risk to national security," according to a recent Federal Register notice.

An anonymous executive for a major nongovernmental group that would be affected told the Washington Post: "We don't know who will do the vetting, what the standards are and whether we could answer any allegation."

The plan was to go into effect Aug. 27.