A new study from the Partnership for Prevention lists five preventative measures that could save the lives of 100,000 Americans each year.

Funded by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the WellPoint Foundation, the study found that a few measures — such as more adults getting flu shots and being screened for cancer — could save tens of thousands of lives each year in the United States.

Here are the five ways:

Quit smoking, for good. 42,000 additional lives would be saved each year if 90 percent of the smokers who are advised by a health professional to quit are offered medication or other assistance. Today, only 28 percent of smokers receive such services.

Take aspirin. 45,000 additional lives would be saved each year if 90 percent of adults took aspirin daily to prevent heart disease. Today, fewer than half of American adults take aspirin preventively.

Get screened for colorectal cancer. 14,000 additional lives would be saved each year if 90 percent of adults age 50 and older were up to date with any recommended screening for colorectal cancer. Today, fewer than 50 percent of adults are up to date with screening.

Get a flu shot. 12,000 additional lives would be saved each year if 90 percent of adults age 50 and older were immunized against influenza annually. Today, 37 percent of adults have had an annual flu vaccination.

Get screened for breast cancer. Nearly 4,000 additional lives would be saved each year if 90 percent of women age 40 and older had been screened for breast cancer in the past two years. Today, 67 percent of women have been screened in the past two years.

Get screened for Chlamydia. 30,000 cases of pelvic inflammatory disease would be prevented annually if 90 percent of sexually active young women had been screened in the past year for Chlamydial infection. Today, 40 percent of young women are being screened annually.