With his marriage to Britney Spears officially over, Kevin Federline is focused on giving their two young sons a secure upbringing outside the media glare so they can "pretend they're like everyone else," his lawyer said.

The couple's divorce was made official Monday. In an interview with The Associated Press, Federline attorney Mark Vincent Kaplan said Tuesday his client will shun the spotlight when he cares for the children under a custody agreement.

"When they are with him, he is going to shield his children from unwanted media attention," Kaplan said. "You will not find a picture of Kevin parading with the children out in a public place.

"He's focused right now on being the best parent that he can be," the attorney added.

Kaplan, who specializes in celebrity family law cases, refused to disclose the custody arrangement or other details in the divorce.

Since February, Spears, 25, and Federline, 29, have shared joint custody of their two sons, 22-month-old Sean Preston and 10-month-old Jayden James. Federline also has two children with former girlfriend Shar Jackson.

However, Kaplan said Federline's life as a celebrity father comes with different demands than many other fathers face, including huge expenses. When they go out, Kaplan said, there must be a nanny and security guards.

"There are people you have to pay so your kids can pretend they're like everyone else," said Kaplan. "When you are a celebrity parent, there are financial dynamics that others not familiar with it can't understand. "

Spears and Federline wed in October 2004, eight months after her first marriage to childhood friend Jason Alexander was annulled. The pop star cited irreconcilable differences when she filed for divorce from Federline on Nov. 7, 2006.

Kaplan said Federline wouldn't comment on Spears' public behavior. Most recently, she's been accused of threatening paparazzi outside a Las Vegas spa.

"He doesn't want to do anything that would be perceived as taking her down a peg," Kaplan said. "His goal is to keep things between him and Britney private. There's a proper forum to discuss issues with a co-parent. That place is not in the public eye."

Asked if things might have been better for their sons if they had made a go of it together, Kaplan sighed.

"In a perfect world, maybe that would be true," he said. "I've seen so many marriages end on that question. But in a perfect world, there are no lawyers."