Michael Mahnke, an artist who lives and works in his Manhattan apartment never imagined that bouncing on a mini trampoline at age 41 would improve his physical and mental health from the inside out.

"Because I live and paint in the same space, I am always breathing in toxic paint fumes, which, over the years, has taken a real toll on my immune system," he said.

To remedy this, Mahnke began incorporating 20 minutes of rebounding into his day, and within a few weeks he could see and feel his muscles tone, his sinuses clear and an increase in creativity.

"For the first time I actually look forward to exercising, because I often get new inspiration and ideas for my paintings,” he said. “Plus bouncing is so fun and easy, I can't help but smile like a child while doing it."

Most people do not equate exercising and healing with the words "fun"

and "smile" but, when done properly, rebounding is a pain-free aerobic exercise, beneficial for all ages and physical conditions.

According to Ted Johnson, a health and fitness consultant, bouncing for just 10 to 20 minutes first thing in the morning encourages weight loss, increases circulation, improves cardiovascular health, lowers stress and lightens your mood.

What specifically makes rebounding so distinctive from other forms of exercise, Johnson said, is the deep cleansing effects it has on the lymphatic system.

The lymphatic system is made up of the lymph vessels and nodes, tonsils, adenoids, appendix, spleen and thymus gland, which provide much of the body's immune defense.

According to Johnson, the lymphatic fluids are responsible for bringing nutrients to the cells and providing the passageway for cells to get rid of their waste.

However, he said, "the lymphatic system does not have a pump like our circulatory system has the heart, so it relies on movement of the body for moving the lymph fluid throughout the body."

Rebounding is the ideal exercise for doing just that and here's why.

According to certified nutritional counselor and author, Natalia Rose, rebounding is the most effective exercise to move toxins from the body because it works in coordination with the laws of gravity, and the up and down motion of jumping "literally squeezes the waste matter from our cells as we bounce effortlessly for just a short time."

This "squeezing" action from the gravitational pull strengthens each cell with every bounce, first drawing the toxins out and then pumping the junk that gets collected in the lymphatic system out of our bodies. While at the same time, said Johnson, "rebounding tones the muscles and strengthens the bones of the body, making it a healthy lifestyle for preventing osteoporosis."

Other lymphatic related illnesses that rebounding can help prevent include: allergies, most skins conditions, infections, chronic sinusitis, inflammation and edema.

"My clients who use the rebounder regularly do not get sick in the cold and flu season nearly as often as they did before," said Johnson

Rebounding is also unique in that it does not inflict pain on the joints, making it a "no impact" exercise. However, an article written by Dr. Morton Walker, author of "Jumping for Health," published in the Townsend Letter of Doctors, warned that low-cost, poorly constructed rebounders yield more harm than good.

"The abrupt jarring effect is the same as landing on the floor," he said, and can do significant damage to your joints.

Morton, Johnson and Rose all advise investing in a high quality rebounder over all generic brands found in most sporting goods shops.

"I have used several different rebounders over the years and bottom line — you get what you pay for," said Johnson.

Currently, Johnson has a 79-year-old female client, who had extensive back surgery with hardware several months ago, using the rebounder.

"Her routine of just gentle bouncing — her feet never leave the mat at this point — is different from my other clients who perform a variety of exercises on the rebounder," he said.

Beginners Rebounder Workout Plan, designed by Johnson. Please consult your physician before starting this exercise program.

Health Bounce – 3 to 4 minutes

Both feet planted on the mat, weight evenly distributed, bouncing straight up and down.

Light Jogging – 2 minutes

Holding on to the stabilizing bar, light jogging in place, bring the knees up in front of you. Stand tall and keep an even pace.

Fluttering – Counts of 25, 3 sets

While doing a health bounce, hold on to the stabilizing bar with one hand and extend the other arm straight out to the side for a count of 25. The count of 25 is based on your bounce. Switch arms to complete the set. Repeat for 3 sets total. When you are comfortable with your balance, extend both arms out at the same time to a count of 25.

Light Jogging – 2 minutes

Holding on to the stabilizing bar, light jogging in place, bring the knees up in front of you. Stand tall and keep an even pace.

Alternating Shoulder Press – Counts of 20, 3 sets

While jogging in place, bring one hand weight up to shoulder level. This hand will not go below this level throughout the exercise. Press the one hand above your head. The up and down rhythm of your hand should be in sync with your jogging. Count each shoulder press to 20. Switch to the other hand and repeat the shoulder press again to 20.

Light Jogging – 2 minutes

Holding on to the stabilizing bar, light jogging in place, bring the knees up in front of you. Stand tall and keep an even pace.

Health Bounce – 2 minutes

Cool down. Both feet planted on the mat, weight evenly distributed, bouncing straight up and down.