Sign in to comment!

Menu
Home

WWE's Dark Side

This is a partial transcript of "The Big Story With John Gibson," June 28, 2007, that has been edited for clarity.

JOHN GIBSON, "BIG STORY" HOST: There are breaking developments tonight in the investigation of the wrestler double murder and suicide. Federal drug agents stormed the office of Chris Benoit's personal doctor in Georgia, confiscated computers and other items from his office. They were likely looking for steroids and evidence that the doctor gave steroids to Benoit.

Also late today, FOXNews.com has learned that the death of Benoit's wife was actually reported on Wikipedia half a day before police actually found her body. Investigators are now working to figure out how that happened and who did it.

The double murders and suicide were certainly a shock to the wrestling world and beyond but it is not the first time one of these big stars did not make it to old age. "Big Story" correspondent Douglas Kennedy has more on the disturbing trend to early deaths and the violent lifestyle of these wrestlers.

DOUGLAS KENNEDY, "BIG STORY" CORRESPONDENT: Yes, John, a lot of these wrestlers die early and a lot of them live violent lives both inside and outside the ring. Many blame wrestling itself for creating a cultural of drug abuse an domestic violence.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

KENNEDY (VOICE-OVER): Professional wrestlers may be the best showmen on earth. But critics say their show often comes at a terrible price.

IRVIN MUCHNICK, "WRESTLING BABYLON" AUTHOR: The wrestlers are on the road constantly with no predictable vacation schedule. There is this unbelievable pressure to have a larger than life look, hence the steroid abuse.

KENNEDY: Early this week, Chris Benoit hung himself after murdering his wife Nancy and their seven-year-old son Daniel. But Benoit isn't the first wrestle to pay the ultimate price or to commit acts of violence. In fact, in the last 10 years, 60 wrestlers have died before the age of 45. Many from self-inflicted wounds.

MUCHNICK: They abuse all kinds of drugs, recreational drugs and prescription medication to help them sleep, to get them through pain, to get them up from depression. Down from the extreme adrenaline highs they get from performing and hearing the cheering of the crowd.

KENNEDY: In 2003, Mr. Perfect Curt Henning died of a cocaine overdose at age had 44. And in 2002, Davey Boy Smith died of an enlarged heart at age 39, possibly from steroid abuse. There is also a long history of domestic violence among wrestlers. In 2000, Rhode Island police arrested a former pro wrestle Harry "Rasputin" Nicholas for allegedly pulling a knife on the 14 yearly daughter of his girlfriend. And in 2003, Nancy Benoit had a restraining order against Chris because of physical abuse.

DEBRA WILLIAMS, STEVE AUSTIN'S EX-WIFE: I have I lived it, I have lived domestic abuse. I've lived -- I don't want to think about what Nancy went through.

KENNEDY: Former wrestling manager Debra Williams was married to world wrestling champion Stone Cold Steve Austin saying she suffered years of physical punishment even while Austin was at the peak of his career. She says their personal life was exactly like wrestling, completely fake.

AUSTIN: Everyone thought we had in wonderful life and we had this big house and we worked together on TV.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

KENNEDY: In reality she says her life was filled with fear and fighting and she blames steroids for making her husband angry and aggressive. And that seems to be the common link, it comes down to steroids every time, John.

GIBSON: Douglas, thank you very much.

Content and Programming Copyright 2007 FOX News Network, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Transcription Copyright 2007 Voxant, Inc. (www.voxant.com), which takes sole responsibility for the accuracy of the transcription. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. No license is granted to the user of this material except for the user's personal or internal use and, in such case, only one copy may be printed, nor shall user use any material for commercial purposes or in any fashion that may infringe upon FOX News Network, LLC'S and Voxant, Inc.'s copyrights or other proprietary rights or interests in the material. This is not a legal transcript for purposes of litigation.